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Blue-Collar Job

The Experts below are selected from a list of 63 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Shinya Kajitani – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Which is Worse for Your Long-term Health, a White-collar or a Blue-Collar Job? (Revised Version)
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Shinya Kajitani

    Abstract:

    Studies examining whether there are different probabilities of entering a period of developing chronic disease or declining in physical ability between different occupations are scarce. We examine whether the duration of good health differs between longest-held occupations, using a discrete time duration model. Utilizing micro data for elderly Japanese males and their respective longest-held occupations, we show that the physical abilities of male Blue-Collar workers decline more rapidly with age, especially after age 60, than those in other occupations. In contrast, the probabilities of being diabetic among male white-collar workers increase more rapidly with age than they do for male Blue-Collar workers. These findings suggest that there are differential effects between blue- and white-collar Jobs on decline in health over time among Japanese men.

  • Which is worse for your long-term health, a white-collar or a Blue-Collar Job?
    Journal of The Japanese and International Economies, 2015
    Co-Authors: Shinya Kajitani

    Abstract:

    Studies examining whether there are different probabilities of developing chronic disease or declining physical ability between different occupations are scarce. Using a discrete time-duration model, I examine whether the duration of good health differs between longest-held occupations. Utilizing micro data for elderly Japanese males and their longest-held occupations, I show that the physical abilities of male Blue-Collar workers decline more rapidly with age, especially after 55years of age, compared to those in other occupations. By contrast, the probabilities of being diabetic among male white-collar workers increase more rapidly with age than they do for male Blue-Collar workers. These findings suggest that there are differential effects between blue- and white-collar Jobs with regard to the decline in health over time among Japanese men.

  • Which is Worse for Your Long-term Health, a White-collar or a Blue-Collar Job? (Revised Version of “Is a Blue-Collar Job Bad for Your Long-term Health?2 [No. 23])
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Shinya Kajitani

    Abstract:

    Studies examining whether there are different probabilities of entering a period of reduced physical ability or chronic disease between different occupations are scarce. We examine whether the duration of good health differs between longest-held occupations, using a discrete time duration model. Utilizing micro data for elderly Japanese workers and their respective longest-held occupations, we show that the physical abilities of male Blue-Collar workers decline more rapidly with age, especially after age 60, than those in other occupations. However, the probabilities of contracting a chronic disease among male white-collar workers increase more rapidly with age than they do for male Blue-Collar workers. In contrast, there were no significant differences observed between longest-held occupations and duration of good health among Japanese women. These findings suggest that there are differential effects between blue- and white-collar Jobs on decline in health over time among Japanese men, but not among women.

Burkhard Schmidt – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • three Job stress models and their relationship with musculoskeletal pain in blue and white collar workers
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: Raphael M Herr, Burkhard Schmidt, Jos A. Bosch, Adrian Loerbroks, Annelies E M Van Vianen, Marc N Jarczok, Joachim E Fischer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives Musculoskeletal pain has been found to co-occur with psychosocial Job stress. However, different conceptualizations of Job stress exist, each emphasizing different aspects of the work environment, and it is unknown which of these aspects show the strongest associations with musculoskeletal pain. Further, these associations may differ for white-collar vs. Blue-Collar Job types, but this has not been tested. The present study examined the independent and combined contributions of Effort–RewardImbalance (ERI), Job-Demand–Control (JDC) and Organizational Justice (OJ) to musculoskeletal pain symptoms among white- and Blue-Collar workers. Methods Participants of a cross-sectional study (n = 1634) completed validated questionnaires measuring ERI, JDC, and OJ, and reported the frequency of pain during the previous year at four anatomical locations (lower back, neck or shoulder, arms and hands, and knees/feet). Pain reports were summarized into a single musculoskeletal symptom score (MSS). Analyses were stratified for white- and Blue-Collar workers. Results Among white-collar workers, ERI and OJ were independently associated with MSS. In addition to these additive effects, significant 2-way and 3-way interactions indicated a synergistic effect of Job stressors in relation to reported pain. In Blue-Collar workers, ERI and JDC independently associated with MSS, and a significant 3-way interaction was observed showing that the combination of Job stressors exceeded an additive effect. Conclusion ERI influences pain symptoms in both occupational groups. OJ was independent significant predictor only among white-collar workers, whereas JDC had additive predictive utility exclusively among Blue-Collar workers. Simultaneous exposure to multiple Job stress factors appeared to synergize pain symptom reporting.

Raphael M Herr – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • three Job stress models and their relationship with musculoskeletal pain in blue and white collar workers
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: Raphael M Herr, Burkhard Schmidt, Jos A. Bosch, Adrian Loerbroks, Annelies E M Van Vianen, Marc N Jarczok, Joachim E Fischer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives Musculoskeletal pain has been found to co-occur with psychosocial Job stress. However, different conceptualizations of Job stress exist, each emphasizing different aspects of the work environment, and it is unknown which of these aspects show the strongest associations with musculoskeletal pain. Further, these associations may differ for white-collar vs. Blue-Collar Job types, but this has not been tested. The present study examined the independent and combined contributions of Effort–RewardImbalance (ERI), Job-Demand–Control (JDC) and Organizational Justice (OJ) to musculoskeletal pain symptoms among white- and Blue-Collar workers. Methods Participants of a cross-sectional study (n = 1634) completed validated questionnaires measuring ERI, JDC, and OJ, and reported the frequency of pain during the previous year at four anatomical locations (lower back, neck or shoulder, arms and hands, and knees/feet). Pain reports were summarized into a single musculoskeletal symptom score (MSS). Analyses were stratified for white- and Blue-Collar workers. Results Among white-collar workers, ERI and OJ were independently associated with MSS. In addition to these additive effects, significant 2-way and 3-way interactions indicated a synergistic effect of Job stressors in relation to reported pain. In Blue-Collar workers, ERI and JDC independently associated with MSS, and a significant 3-way interaction was observed showing that the combination of Job stressors exceeded an additive effect. Conclusion ERI influences pain symptoms in both occupational groups. OJ was independent significant predictor only among white-collar workers, whereas JDC had additive predictive utility exclusively among Blue-Collar workers. Simultaneous exposure to multiple Job stress factors appeared to synergize pain symptom reporting.