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Bluetooth Radio

The Experts below are selected from a list of 825 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Chih-yung Chang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • PAMP: A Power-Aware Multicast Protocol for Bluetooth Radio Systems Gwo-Jong Yu
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Chih-yung Chang, Kuei-ping Shih, Hsu-jui Chang

    Abstract:

    Abstract-Bluetooth is a low power, low cost, and short-range wireless technology. A piconet consists of a master and ups to seven slaves. Devices that desire for receiving data from the same source will construct a multicast group, sharing multicast communication services. A piconet may consist of member and non-member devices of a multicast group, causing non-member devices consuming power for overhearing the multicast message. Rr those members that belong to different Piconeb, a multi-hop communication path is required, hence increases the delay time of multicast service and causes more non-member devices to participate the multicast tree. This paper develops a Power-Aware Multicast Protocol VAMP) for constructing an eflicient multicast tree. By collecting members into same piconet, the constructed multicast tree has characteristics of least non-member devices, smallest tree level, and proper role assignments to members. Experiment results show that PAMP provides eflicient multicast service with low power consumption and small deiav.

  • MATR: A Mobility-Aware Topology Restructuring Scheme for Bluetooth Body Area Networks
    Journal of Internet Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Qiaoyun Zhang, Chih-yung Chang, Guilin Chen, Cheng-chang Chen

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth low energy technology has gradually penetrated into people’s daily life. Nowadays, a number of wearable devices which are embedded with tiny sensors and Bluetooth Radio can create a Bluetooth body area networks (BANs). Because of human mobility, the signal strength of Bluetooth links might be decreased with the link distance, increasing the transmission delay and hence dropping the network throughputs. Considering the mobility issue, this paper presents a mobility-aware topology restructuring scheme, called MATR, for Bluetooth body area networks. The proposed MATR mechanism changes the piconet topology for redirecting the traffic flow to the links with better quality. In addition, the proposed mechanism is also extended to restructure the topology of a scatternet, further reducing the transmission delay of link connecting different Piconets. Performance study reveals that the proposed MATR approaches further reduce the transmission delay and the energy consumption for Bluetooth BANs, decrease the network overheads raised by packet retransmissions, and improve the network throughput of Bluetooth Radio area networks.

  • Topology constructing and restructuring mechanisms for Bluetooth Radio networks
    2016 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics-Taiwan (ICCE-TW), 2016
    Co-Authors: Qiaoyun Zhang, Guilin Chen, Liang Zhao, Chih-yung Chang

    Abstract:

    The Bluetooth wireless communication technology which is widely used for short-range communications. It operates on 2.4GHz ISM band. In addition, Bluetooth and IEEE 802.11(Wi-Fi) devices are possible and likely to occur on the specific channel in the same location. Bluetooth devices adopt frequency hopping scheme to prevent the likelihood of mutual interferences. Although the frequency hopping can reduce some interferences, as the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices are coexisted in the neighborhood, the performances of both networks will be degraded likely. Because they operate on the same band and can’t communicate with each other. An interference aware approach for improving the throughput of a given piconet is presented in this paper. An interference aware piconet restructuring mechanism, called IAPR, is proposed. The proposed models are based on role switch operation. The analytical results show that the proposed IAPR approach further improves the network performance between the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices and improves the throughput of Bluetooth Radio networks.

H. Darabi – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A dual mode 802.11b/Bluetooth Radio in 0.35/spl mu/m CMOS
    IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2020
    Co-Authors: H. Darabi, J. Chiu, S. Khorram, Zhimin Zhou, Shan Jiang, K. Evans, E. Chien, B. Ibrahim

    Abstract:

    A fully integrated dual-mode CMOS transceiver tuned to 2.4 GHz consumes 65 mA in receive mode and 78 mA in transmit mode from a 3-V supply. The Radio includes all the receive and transmit building blocks, such as frequency synthesizer, voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), and power amplifier, and is intended for use in 802.11b and Bluetooth applications. The Bluetooth receiver uses a low-IF architecture for higher level of integration and lower power consumption, while the 802.11b receiver is direct conversion. The receiver achieves a typical sensitivity of -88 dBm at 11 Mb/s for 802.11b, and -83 dBm for Bluetooth mode. The receiver minimum IIP3 is -8 dBm. Both transmitters use a direct-conversion architecture, and deliver a nominal output power of 0 dBm, with a power range of 20 dB in 2-dB steps.

  • A dual-mode 802.11b/Bluetooth Radio in 0.35-/spl mu/m CMOS
    IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, 2005
    Co-Authors: H. Darabi, J. Chiu, S. Khorram, Zhimin Zhou, B. Ibrahim, E. Geronaga, L.h. Tran, A. Rofougaran

    Abstract:

    A fully integrated dual-mode CMOS transceiver tuned to 2.4 GHz consumes 65 mA in receive mode and 78 mA in transmit mode from a 3-V supply. The Radio includes all the receive and transmit building blocks, such as frequency synthesizer, voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), and power amplifier, and is intended for use in 802.11b and Bluetooth applications. The Bluetooth receiver uses a low-IF architecture for higher level of integration and lower power consumption, while the 802.11b receiver is direct conversion. The receiver achieves a typical sensitivity of -88 dBm at 11 Mb/s for 802.11b, and -83 dBm for Bluetooth mode. The receiver minimum IIP3 is -8 dBm. Both transmitters use a direct-conversion architecture, and deliver a nominal output power of 0 dBm, with a power range of 20 dB in 2-dB steps.

  • A dual mode 802.11b/Bluetooth Radio in 0.35/spl mu/m CMOS
    2003 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference 2003. Digest of Technical Papers. ISSCC., 2003
    Co-Authors: H. Darabi, J. Chiu, S. Khorram, Zhimin Zhou, Shan Jiang, K. Evans, E. Chien, B. Ibrahim, E. Geronaga, L. Tran

    Abstract:

    A dual-mode CMOS 2.4GHz transceiver consumes 65mA in RX and 78mA in TX from a 3V supply. The receiver achieves a typical sensitivity of -88dBm at 11Mb/s for 802.11b, and -83dBm for Bluetooth mode. The receiver minimum IIP3 is -8dBm, and the transmitter delivers a nominal output power of 0dBm, with a power control range of 20dB in 2dB steps.

Chao-tsun Chang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • tmcp two layer multicast communication protocol for Bluetooth Radio networks
    Computer Networks, 2008
    Co-Authors: Chao-tsun Chang, Chih-yung Chang, Sheng-wen Chang

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth is a low power, low cost, and short-range wireless technology developed for Personal Area Networks (PANs). A Bluetooth multicast group is a set of Bluetooth devices that desire for periodically receiving the multicast messages from the same source. For reducing the propagation delay and saving the bandwidth and energy consumptions, a multicast tree which connects all multicast members serves for the delivery of multicast messages. However, a given connected scatternet topology may not be appropriate for constructing an efficient multicast tree and hence causes power consumption and end-to-end delay. This paper develops a two-layer multicast communication protocol (TMCP) using role switching techniques for constructing an efficient multicast tree. The proposed TMCP collects as many as possible the members into the same piconet, reduces the length of multicast paths and assigns each member with a proper role. The constructed multicast tree has several features including as few as possible the non-member devices, the smallest tree level and the minimal propagation delay. Experiment results show that the TMCP offers efficient multicast service with low power consumption and small delay.

  • tarp a traffic aware restructuring protocol for Bluetooth Radio networks
    Computer Networks, 2007
    Co-Authors: Chih-yung Chang, Chao-tsun Chang

    Abstract:

    Bluetooth is a low-cost and short-range wireless communication technology. The Bluetooth device randomly searches and connects with other devices using the inquiry/inquiry scan and the page/page scan operations, resulting an uncontrolled scatternet topology. The unpredictable scatternet topology usually raises the problem of redundant traffic and causes inefficient communications. A traffic-aware restructuring protocol (TARP) is presented for partially restructuring a piconet or a pair of two neighboring piconets by applying role switch mechanism. The proposed TARP mainly consists of intra-piconet and inter-piconet restructuring protocols. According to the recent routes and their traffic load information, the intra-piconet restructuring protocol adjusts piconet structure by selecting the proper device to play a master role of a piconet and applies takeover operation to rapidly restructure the piconet topology. The inter-piconet restructuring protocol exchanges devices of two neighboring piconets to reduce the route length and thus improve the power and bandwidth consumptions and the end-to-end transmission delay. Performance results reveal that the proposed restructuring protocols reduce path length of recent routes and save power consumption, thus significantly improve the performance for a given connected scatternet.

  • bluecube constructing a hypercube parallel computing and communication environment over Bluetooth Radio systems
    Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, 2006
    Co-Authors: Chao-tsun Chang, Chih-yung Chang, Jang-ping Sheu

    Abstract:

    In parallel computing structures, Hypercubes [P. J. Wan, L. W. Liu, Y. Yang, Optimal routing based on the super-topology in Hypercube WDM networks, 1999, pp. 142-149] and [Y. R. Leu, S. Y. Kuo, A fault-tolerant tree communication scheme for hypercube systems, IEEE Trans Comput. 45(6) (1996) 643-650] have many advantages: they support parallel computing, provide disjoint paths, and tolerate faults. If devices with computing capabilities can be linked as a Hypercube by taking advantage of Bluetooth Radio‘s features, then an efficient communication and high-performance computing environment can be established by applying currently used algorithms. A Bluetooth device randomly searches for and connects with other devices, using time-consuming inquiry/inquiry scan and page/page scan operation and hence, results in an uncontrolled scatternet topology and inefficient communications. The present work proposes a three-stage distributed construction protocol for rapidly organizing a Hypercube computing environment that was constructed from Bluetooth devices. The proposed protocol governs the construction of links, the assigning of roles and the formation of the scatternet in order to efficiently construct a Hypercube structure. The constructed scatternet easily enables Bluetooth devices to establish a routing path, tolerate faults and create disjoint paths, and thus, achieves parallel and distributed computing in a Bluetooth wireless environment. Experimental results reveal that the proposed protocol can set up a scatternet that is appropriate for parallel computing and communications.