Body Computed Tomography - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Body Computed Tomography

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Maja Hinge – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • whole Body Computed Tomography versus conventional skeletal survey in patients with multiple myeloma a study of the international myeloma working group
    Blood Cancer Journal, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jens Hillengass, Niels Abildgaard, Lia A. Moulopoulos, Stefan Delorme, Jennifer Mosebach, Thomas Hielscher, Matthew T. Drake, S V Rajkumar, B Oestergaard, Maja Hinge

    Abstract:

    For decades, conventional skeletal survey (CSS) has been the standard imaging technique for multiple myeloma (MM). However, recently whole-Body Computed Tomography (WBCT) has been implemented into the diagnostic criteria of MM. This analysis compares sensitivity and prognostic significance of WBCT and CSS in patients with smoldering MM (SMM) and MM. Fifty-four of 212 patients (25.5%) had a negative CSS and a positive WBCT for osteolytic lesions (P<0.0001). Of 66 patients with SMM based on CSS, 12 (22.2%) had osteolytic lesions on WBCT. In comparison, WBCT failed to detect some bone destructions in the appendicular skeleton possibly due to limitations of the field of view. Presence of lytic bone lesions in WBCT was of borderline prognostic significance (P=0.051) for SMM patients, with a median time to progression of 38 versus 82 months for those without bone destructions. In conclusion, WBCT identifies significantly more sites of bone destruction than CSS. More than 20% of patients with SMM according to CSS have in fact active MM detectable with WBCT. On the basis of this and other studies, WBCT (either Computed Tomography (CT) alone or as part of a positron emission Tomography-CT protocol) should be considered the current standard for the detection of osteolytic lesions in MM.

A. J. Van Der Molen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The influence of arm positions on abdominal image quality of whole-Body Computed Tomography in trauma: systematic review
    Emergency Radiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: E. S. Speelman, B. Brocx, J. E. Wilbers, O. Ivashchenko, Y. Tank, A. J. Van Der Molen

    Abstract:

    Whole-Body Computed Tomography (WBCT) is the standard diagnostic method for evaluating polytrauma patients. When patients are unable to elevate their arms, the arms are placed along the Body, which affects the image quality negatively. Aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the influence of below the shoulder arm positions on image quality of WBCT. Literature in PubMed and Scopus databases was systematically searched. Results of the papers were stratified into 4 categories: arms elevated, 1 arm up 1 arm down, arms ventrally supported, arms along the Body. A qualitative analysis was performed on subjective image quality and a quantitative analysis on objective quality (image noise). Eight studies were included with 1421 participants. Various studies reported significantly higher quality scores with arms elevated, compared to arms along the Body. Significant differences in objective image quality were found between the arms elevated and the arms ventrally on support group. The arms ventrally supported group had a significantly higher image quality than the arms along the Body group. A statistically significant difference was found in objective image quality between the 1 arm up 1 arm down and arms along the Body group. No preferential below the shoulders position could be identified. Positioning the arms alongside the Body results in a poor image quality. Placing the arms on a pillow ventrally to the chest improves image quality. Interestingly, asymmetrical arm positioning has potential to improve the image quality for patients that are unable to elevate the arms.

  • The influence of arm positions on abdominal image quality of whole-Body Computed Tomography in trauma: systematic review
    Emergency Radiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: E. S. Speelman, B. Brocx, J. E. Wilbers, O. Ivashchenko, Y. Tank, M. J. Bie, A. J. Van Der Molen

    Abstract:

    Purpose Whole-Body Computed Tomography (WBCT) is the standard diagnostic method for evaluating polytrauma patients. When patients are unable to elevate their arms, the arms are placed along the Body, which affects the image quality negatively. Aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the influence of below the shoulder arm positions on image quality of WBCT. Methods Literature in PubMed and Scopus databases was systematically searched. Results of the papers were stratified into 4 categories: arms elevated, 1 arm up 1 arm down, arms ventrally supported, arms along the Body. A qualitative analysis was performed on subjective image quality and a quantitative analysis on objective quality (image noise). Results Eight studies were included with 1421 participants. Various studies reported significantly higher quality scores with arms elevated, compared to arms along the Body. Significant differences in objective image quality were found between the arms elevated and the arms ventrally on support group. The arms ventrally supported group had a significantly higher image quality than the arms along the Body group. A statistically significant difference was found in objective image quality between the 1 arm up 1 arm down and arms along the Body group. No preferential below the shoulders position could be identified. Conclusion Positioning the arms alongside the Body results in a poor image quality. Placing the arms on a pillow ventrally to the chest improves image quality. Interestingly, asymmetrical arm positioning has potential to improve the image quality for patients that are unable to elevate the arms.

Jens Hillengass – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Whole-Body Computed Tomography versus conventional skeletal survey in patients with multiple myeloma: A study of the International Myeloma Working Group
    Blood Cancer Journal, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jens Hillengass, Lia A. Moulopoulos, Stefan Delorme, Koutoulidis, Jennifer Mosebach, Thomas Hielscher, Matthew T. Drake, S V Rajkumar, B Oestergaard, Niels Abildgaard

    Abstract:

    For decades, conventional skeletal survey (CSS) has been the standard imaging technique for multiple myeloma (MM). However, recently whole-Body Computed Tomography (WBCT) has been implemented into the diagnostic criteria of MM. This analysis compares sensitivity and prognostic significance of WBCT and CSS in patients with smoldering MM (SMM) and MM. Fifty-four of 212 patients (25.5%) had a negative CSS and a positive WBCT for osteolytic lesions (P

  • whole Body Computed Tomography versus conventional skeletal survey in patients with multiple myeloma a study of the international myeloma working group
    Blood Cancer Journal, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jens Hillengass, Niels Abildgaard, Lia A. Moulopoulos, Stefan Delorme, Jennifer Mosebach, Thomas Hielscher, Matthew T. Drake, S V Rajkumar, B Oestergaard, Maja Hinge

    Abstract:

    For decades, conventional skeletal survey (CSS) has been the standard imaging technique for multiple myeloma (MM). However, recently whole-Body Computed Tomography (WBCT) has been implemented into the diagnostic criteria of MM. This analysis compares sensitivity and prognostic significance of WBCT and CSS in patients with smoldering MM (SMM) and MM. Fifty-four of 212 patients (25.5%) had a negative CSS and a positive WBCT for osteolytic lesions (P<0.0001). Of 66 patients with SMM based on CSS, 12 (22.2%) had osteolytic lesions on WBCT. In comparison, WBCT failed to detect some bone destructions in the appendicular skeleton possibly due to limitations of the field of view. Presence of lytic bone lesions in WBCT was of borderline prognostic significance (P=0.051) for SMM patients, with a median time to progression of 38 versus 82 months for those without bone destructions. In conclusion, WBCT identifies significantly more sites of bone destruction than CSS. More than 20% of patients with SMM according to CSS have in fact active MM detectable with WBCT. On the basis of this and other studies, WBCT (either Computed Tomography (CT) alone or as part of a positron emission Tomography-CT protocol) should be considered the current standard for the detection of osteolytic lesions in MM.