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Body Image Development

The Experts below are selected from a list of 231 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Eva S Lefkowitz – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • gender and racial ethnic differences in Body Image Development among college students
    Body Image, 2012
    Co-Authors: Meghan M Gillen, Eva S Lefkowitz

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study we used longitudinal methods to examine Body Image Development during the early part of college. Students (N = 390; 54% female) who identified as African American (32%), Latino/a American (27%), and European American (41%) completed surveys during their first, second, and third semesters at college. There were overall gender and racial/ethnic differences in all three aspects of Body Image, and both stability and change in Body Image Development. Female students’ appearance evaluation became more positive, whereas male students’ appearance evaluation showed no significant change. Individuals’ Body areas satisfaction increased over time, but remained stable when controlling for BMI. Appearance orientation did not change, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development. Experiences in the college environment may play a role in these trends.

  • Gender and racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development among college students.
    Body Image, 2011
    Co-Authors: Meghan M Gillen, Eva S Lefkowitz

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study we used longitudinal methods to examine Body Image Development during the early part of college. Students (N = 390; 54% female) who identified as African American (32%), Latino/a American (27%), and European American (41%) completed surveys during their first, second, and third semesters at college. There were overall gender and racial/ethnic differences in all three aspects of Body Image, and both stability and change in Body Image Development. Female students’ appearance evaluation became more positive, whereas male students’ appearance evaluation showed no significant change. Individuals’ Body areas satisfaction increased over time, but remained stable when controlling for BMI. Appearance orientation did not change, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development. Experiences in the college environment may play a role in these trends.

Meghan M Gillen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • gender and racial ethnic differences in Body Image Development among college students
    Body Image, 2012
    Co-Authors: Meghan M Gillen, Eva S Lefkowitz

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study we used longitudinal methods to examine Body Image Development during the early part of college. Students (N = 390; 54% female) who identified as African American (32%), Latino/a American (27%), and European American (41%) completed surveys during their first, second, and third semesters at college. There were overall gender and racial/ethnic differences in all three aspects of Body Image, and both stability and change in Body Image Development. Female students’ appearance evaluation became more positive, whereas male students’ appearance evaluation showed no significant change. Individuals’ Body areas satisfaction increased over time, but remained stable when controlling for BMI. Appearance orientation did not change, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development. Experiences in the college environment may play a role in these trends.

  • Gender and racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development among college students.
    Body Image, 2011
    Co-Authors: Meghan M Gillen, Eva S Lefkowitz

    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study we used longitudinal methods to examine Body Image Development during the early part of college. Students (N = 390; 54% female) who identified as African American (32%), Latino/a American (27%), and European American (41%) completed surveys during their first, second, and third semesters at college. There were overall gender and racial/ethnic differences in all three aspects of Body Image, and both stability and change in Body Image Development. Female students’ appearance evaluation became more positive, whereas male students’ appearance evaluation showed no significant change. Individuals’ Body areas satisfaction increased over time, but remained stable when controlling for BMI. Appearance orientation did not change, and there were no racial/ethnic differences in Body Image Development. Experiences in the college environment may play a role in these trends.

Susan J Paxton – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Body Image Development – Adolescent Girls
    Encyclopedia of Body Image and Human Appearance, 2020
    Co-Authors: Eleanor H Wertheim, Susan J Paxton

    Abstract:

    This article reviews factors associated with Body Image Development in adolescent girls. An overview of a biopsychosocial model of risk and protective factors is provided. Biological influences described include Body size and shape, perceptual factors, and pubertal changes. Psychological factors include global personality and general well-being, as well as specific cognitive styles such as appearance schemas, Body comparison tendencies, and internalization of Body ideals. Sociocultural factors discussed include cultural and social norms; media, parent, peer, and professional influences; and cyber-communication. Longitudinal research suggests that adolescent Body Image is relatively stable after early adolescence, and can have effects on well-being.

  • Do we cause harm? Understanding the impact of research with young children about their Body Image.
    Body Image, 2020
    Co-Authors: Stephanie R. Damiano, Siân A. Mclean, Lilly Nguyen, Zali Yager, Susan J Paxton

    Abstract:

    Abstract Although research into the early Development of Body Image and eating behaviors is essential, concerns have been raised about whether their assessment might precipitate Body or eating concerns in children. We aimed to identify how parents perceived their young children (under 9 years) had been impacted from involvement in the longitudinal Children’s Body Image Development Study (CBIDS) that assessed Body Image and eating behaviors. Participants were 218 parents (99 % mothers) who completed an online questionnaire assessing whether and why their child discontinued participation in CBIDS, and the perceived impact of participation on children’s Body Image, weight attitudes, language about bodies, internalisation of appearance ideals, peer appearance conversations, dietary restraint, muscle building activities, and physical activity. Impact and reasons for cessation of participation were assessed retrospectively. Almost all parents were positive or neutral about their child’s involvement, 0.5%–3.2% of parents perceived a negative impact in an area, and 0.9 % of parents moderately agreed that they regretted participating in CBIDS. Themes for positive and negative aspects of CBIDS involvement were explored using thematic analysis. Although research is essential to guide Development of prevention strategies, this study highlights the need to implement safeguards to ensure a positive experience for all children.

  • Maternal influences on Body Image and eating concerns among 7- and 8-year-old boys and girls: Cross-sectional and prospective relations.
    International Journal of Eating Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Rachel F. Rodgers, Eleanor H Wertheim, Stephanie R. Damiano, Susan J Paxton

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE Little is known regarding maternal influences on the Body Image and eating concerns of young children. The current study aimed to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between maternal comments about their child’s weight and shape and eating, and mothers’ own Body dissatisfaction and disordered eating on one hand, and their children’s Body esteem and disordered eating behaviors on the other. METHOD Children, n = 244 of the fifth wave, aged 7 years (58% female), and n = 194 of the sixth wave, aged 8 years (57% female), of the longitudinal Children’s Body Image Development Study, in Melbourne, Australia were included. Mothers completed measures of Body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and comments and concerns regarding their children’s weight and eating behaviors. They also reported on their children’s disordered eating behaviors. Children’s Body esteem was assessed through a child interview. RESULTS Findings revealed cross-sectional and prospective bivariate relationships between maternal comments and disordered eating behaviors among both boys and girls. Similar patterns of relationships emerged between maternal Body dissatisfaction and lower child Body esteem. CONCLUSION Findings highlight the importance of conducting prevention within the family environment from a young age, and targeting both direct communication as well as parental Body Image and eating behaviors.