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Body Temperature Measurement

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Wenyu Liang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • re visiting the tympanic membrane vicinity as core Body Temperature Measurement site
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Wui Keat Yeoh, Wenyu Liang

    Abstract:

    Core Body Temperature (CBT) is an important and commonly used indicator of human health and endurance performance. A rise in baseline CBT can be attributed to an onset of flu, infection or even thermoregulatory failure when it becomes excessive. Sites which have been used for Measurement of CBT include the pulmonary artery, the esophagus, the rectum and the tympanic membrane. Among them, the tympanic membrane is an attractive Measurement site for CBT due to its unobtrusive nature and ease of Measurement facilitated, especially when continuous CBT Measurements are needed for monitoring such as during military, occupational and sporting settings. However, to-date, there are still polarizing views on the suitability of tympanic membrane as a CBT site. This paper will revisit a number of key unresolved issues in the literature and also presents, for the first time, a benchmark of the middle ear Temperature against Temperature Measurements from other sites. Results from experiments carried out on human and primate subjects will be presented to draw a fresh set of insights against the backdrop of hypotheses and controversies.

Paul Fulbrook – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • core Body Temperature Measurement a comparison of axilla tympanic membrane and pulmonary artery blood Temperature
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 1997
    Co-Authors: Paul Fulbrook

    Abstract:

    This research study was undertaken to examine the relationship between pulmonary artery blood Temperature (regarded as the ‘gold standard’ Measurement for core Body Temperature), axilla Temperature using the Tempa.DOT Ax chemical thermometer and tympanic membrane Temperature using the Diatek 9000 Insta Temp thermometer. Sixty adult intensive care patients had their Temperatures monitored. A single set of five simultaneous Temperatures, i.e. left and right axilla, left and right tympanic membrane (TM), and pulmonary artery (PA) blood were recorded. The mean difference between left and right TM Temperatures was 0.58°C, and although both were moderately well correlated with PA Temperature ( r = 0.63 and 0.78, respectively) the mean differences between the two sites were clinically significant (0.85°C and 0.94°C, respectively). The range of differences between the sites was significant. Plotting limits of agreement showed that both left and right TM Temperatures may be up to 1.2°C above or 1.3°C below PA blood Temperature: a clinically unacceptable range. In particular, large Temperature differences were recorded when patients were lying with one side of their head to a pillow. Fan therapy directed to the head was not found to affect these differences significantly. The mean difference between left and right axilla Temperatures was 0.36°C, and although both were modestly correlated with PA Temperature ( r = 0.48 and 0.53, respectively) the mean differences between the two sites were clinically significant (0.47°C and 0.50°C, respectively). The range of differences between the sites was particularly significant. Plotting limits of agreement showed that both left and right axilla Temperatures may be up to 1.2°C above or 1.6°C below PA blood Temperature: a clinically unacceptable range. Because the range of Temperature differences found between PA blood and the other sites was so great, it is concluded that neither the chemical axilla thermometer nor the tympanic membrane thermometer used in this study are clinically reliable tools for adult intensive care patients.

Wui Keat Yeoh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • re visiting the tympanic membrane vicinity as core Body Temperature Measurement site
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Wui Keat Yeoh, Wenyu Liang

    Abstract:

    Core Body Temperature (CBT) is an important and commonly used indicator of human health and endurance performance. A rise in baseline CBT can be attributed to an onset of flu, infection or even thermoregulatory failure when it becomes excessive. Sites which have been used for Measurement of CBT include the pulmonary artery, the esophagus, the rectum and the tympanic membrane. Among them, the tympanic membrane is an attractive Measurement site for CBT due to its unobtrusive nature and ease of Measurement facilitated, especially when continuous CBT Measurements are needed for monitoring such as during military, occupational and sporting settings. However, to-date, there are still polarizing views on the suitability of tympanic membrane as a CBT site. This paper will revisit a number of key unresolved issues in the literature and also presents, for the first time, a benchmark of the middle ear Temperature against Temperature Measurements from other sites. Results from experiments carried out on human and primate subjects will be presented to draw a fresh set of insights against the backdrop of hypotheses and controversies.