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Bolete

The Experts below are selected from a list of 843 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Jerzy Falandysz – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bolete mushroom boletus bainiugan from yunnan as a reflection of the geographical distribution of 210po 210pb and uranium 234u 235u 238u radionuclides their intake rates and effective exposure doses
    Chemosphere, 2020
    Co-Authors: Dagmara I Struminskaparulska, Ji Zhang, Jerzy Falandysz, Grzegorz Olszewski, Aleksandra Moniakowska

    Abstract:

    Abstract This pioneering study aimed to determine the activity concentrations of 210Po, 210Pb and uranium (234U, 235U, 238U) radionuclides in fruit bodies of wild Bolete Boletus bainiugan Dentinger and to estimate its edible safety, which may give scientific evidence for the consumption of this species. The analyses were performed using alpha spectrometer after digestion, exchange resins separation and deposition. Measurement data were analysed and interpolation maps reflecting 210Po, 210Pb and uranium (234U, 235U, 238U) geographical distribution in Yunnan province (China) were presented. In addition, from the perspective of food safety, the possible related effective radiation dose to mushrooms consumers were estimated. The results indicated that 210Po, 210Pb and uranium (234U, 235U, 238U) radionuclides contents in B. bainiugan were significantly different with respect to geographical distribution, and their possible intake in a part of the region was considerably higher. A very interesting observation was done according to the values of 235U/238U activity ratio indicating the occurrence of uranium faction from the global fallout of nuclear weapon tests.

  • 90 sr in king Bolete boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in europe and china
    Science of The Total Environment, 2016
    Co-Authors: Michal Saniewski, Yuanzhong Wang, Tamara Zalewska, Grazyna Krasinska, Natalia Szylke, Jerzy Falandysz

    Abstract:

    Abstract The 90 Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996–2013. Measurement of 90 Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed 90 Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg − 1 dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the 90 Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg − 1 dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg − 1 dry biomass in 1998–2010. A sample of Sarcodon imbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed 90 Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg − 1 dry biomass. Concentration of 90 Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus ( Xerocomus or Boletus ) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg − 1 dry biomass. In several other species from Poland 90 Sr was at − 1 dry biomass. Activity concentrations of 90 Sr in popular B. edulis and some other mushrooms collected from wild in Poland were very low ( − 1 dry biomass), and values noted showed on persistence of this type of radioactivity in mushrooms over time passing from nuclear weapons tests and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant catastrophe.

  • Trace elements in Variegated Bolete (Suillus variegatus) fungi
    Chemical Papers, 2012
    Co-Authors: Joanna Szubstarska, Grażyna Jarzyńska, Jerzy Falandysz

    Abstract:

    Metallic elements such as Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zn were determined using ICP-OES in a representative set of fifteen fruiting bodies of the edible fungus Suillus variegatus . Fruiting bodies were collected from unpolluted areas near the village of Lubichowo of the Bory Tucholskie forest complex in northern Poland in 2007–2008. The caps were richer in Ag, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K,Mg, Ni, Rb, and Zn, and the stipes in Ba, Ca, Mn, Na, Pb, and Sr. Cobalt concentration in the caps and stipes was similar. In the caps, the content of the elements decreased in the order (mg per kg of dry weight): K 29000 ± 3700, Fe 1600 ± 80, Mg 990 ± 110, Rb 320 ± 86, Zn 90 ± 19, Ca 75 ± 34, Al 68 ± 32, Na 40 ± 18, Cu 19 ± 7, Mn 13 ± 7, Cd 1.0 ± 0.5, Ni 0.64 ± 0.32, Ag 0.40 ± 0.20, Cr 0.33 ± 0.06, Pb 0.20 ± 0.17, Ba 0.19 ± 0.11, Sr 0.15 ± 0.09, and Co 0.070 ± 0.050. Apparently, S. variegatus collected from background areas are relatively low in Pb and Cd and so are suitable for human consumption.

Grazyna Jarzynska – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mineral composition and heavy metal accumulation capacity of bay Bolete xerocomus badius fruiting bodies collected near a former gold and copper mining area
    Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 2012
    Co-Authors: Anna K Kojta, Grazyna Jarzynska, Jerzy Falandysz

    Abstract:

    Abstract Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sr and Zn were determined in edible Bay Boletes and beneath top soils from a forested mine dump at the site of a medieval gold and copper mine near the town of Zlotoryja in southern Poland and in mushrooms from a reference site in Tucholskie Forest in the north of Poland. Bay Bolete mushrooms collected from Zlotoryja site accumulated in their flesh more Ag, and Pb and also Ba and Mn but less P and Rb (p   700 μg g− 1 dw), followed by Na, Rb and Zn (around 200 to 400 μg g− 1 dw) and next by Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ag (> 1 μg g− 1 dw at Z site and

  • trace elements profile of slate Bolete leccinum duriusculum mushroom and associated upper soil horizon
    Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 2012
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jarzynska, Jerzy Falandysz

    Abstract:

    Abstract The aim of this study was to characterize the profile and bioconcentration potential of 17 metallic elements and phosphorous in fruiting bodies of edible Slate Bolete ( Leccinum duriusculum ) mushroom in relation to their content in top soils beneath the mushrooms. Slate Bolete is a more effective extractor of many elements from soils compared to 20% solution of nitric acid. However, some elements, especially those abundant in soils (such as Al, Fe) are less efficiently extracted by the mushrooms or their uptake is regulated according to mushroom’s physiological needs. The elements K, P and Mg were particularly abundant with mean values of 37, 5.8 and 1.1 g kg − 1 dry weight (dw) in caps of Slate Bolete, respectively, and they were followed by Rb, Na and Zn with mean values of 350, 340, 150 mg kg − 1 dw, respectively. The concentrations of Mn, Cu, Al, Fe and Ca were between ~ 16 and 88 mg kg − 1 dw, while the other elements were ~ l.0 mg kg − 1 dw or less. The caps and stipes showed similar concentrations of Al, Mn and Ni (p > 0.05), while they showed different concentrations for Ag, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, Rb, Sr and Zn (p  U test). From the nutritional point of view, Slate Bolete is a rich dietary source of essential elements such as Rb, K, Cu, Zn, P and Mg. The toxic elements, Cd and Pb, contained in Slate Bolete are below established limits and do not pose a threat to consumer’s health.

  • concentrations and bioconcentration factors of minerals in yellow cracking Bolete xerocomus subtomentosus mushroom collected in notec forest poland
    Journal of Food Science, 2012
    Co-Authors: Grazyna Jarzynska, Anna Dryzalowska, Aleksandra Chojnacka, I C Nnorom, Jerzy Falandysz

    Abstract:

    UNLABELLED: Yellow-cracking Bolete (Xerocomus subtomentosus) mushrooms and soil were collected from Notec Forest–a large forested enclave in western part of Poland. Mercury was determined by cold vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy and the other elements by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. K, P, and Mg were particularly abundant, with mean values of 46000, 8400, and 1100 mg/kg dry weight (dw) in caps followed by Na, Rb, Zn, and Ca with mean concentrations of 580, 350, 200, and 170 mg/kg dw, respectively. In descending order, the mean concentrations of Fe, Al, Cu, and Mn were 52, 49, 46, and 14 mg/kg dw, while the mean for the remaining elements was around 1.0 mg/kg dw or less. The elements such as Ca, Cu, Hg, K, Mg, Na, P, Rb, Zn, Ag, Cd, and Ni were accumulated (with bioconcentration factor (BCF) > 1), while Al, Ba, Fe, Mn, Sr, Co, Cr, and Pb were excluded (BCF < 1) in the fruiting bodies. The Pb and Cd content did not exceed the maximum levels set by the EU for cultivated mushrooms. Mercury in a conventional meal (300 g) portion of Yellow-cracking Bolete was far below the provisionally tolerable weekly intake of 0.004 mg/kg body weight (bw) as reevaluated recently by WHO. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: The method presented in this study allows one to determine the content of 20 elements (Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zn) in caps and stipes of Yellow-cracking Bolete (Xerocomus subtomentosus) mushrooms and soil samples collected from Poland. This study has revealed that the total Cd, Hg, and Pb dose provided to human body due to consumption of Yellow-cracking Bolete does not pose threat to a consumer’s health.

L. Freire – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Gyroporus ammophilus, a new poisonous Bolete from the Iberian Peninsula
    Persoonia: Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi, 1996
    Co-Authors: M. L. Castro, L. Freire

    Abstract:

    Gyroporus ammophilus, a poisonous Bolete occurring in Pinus woods on sandy soils along the western Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula, originally published as a variety of G. castaneus, is formally raised to the rank of species. The distinguishing characters of Gyroporus ammophilus are given against G. castaneus (Bull.: Fr.) Quél. The new species causes severe gastroenteritis when consumed.

  • Gyroporus ammophilus, a new poisonous Bolete from the Iberian Peninsula
    Persoonia, 1995
    Co-Authors: M. L. Castro, L. Freire

    Abstract:

    Gyroporus ammophilus, a poisonous Bolete occurring in Pinus woods on sandy soils along the western Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula, originally published as a variety of G. castaneus, is formally raised to the rank of species. The distinguishing characters of Gyroporus ammophilus are given against G. castaneus (Bull.: Fr.) Quel. The new species causes severe gastroenteritis when consumed.