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Bond Strength Test

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Marco Ferrari – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • academy of dental materials guidance on in vitro Testing of dental composite Bonding effectiveness to dentin enamel using micro tensile Bond Strength μtbs approach
    Dental Materials, 2017
    Co-Authors: Steve R Armstrong, Luca Breschi, Frank Pfefferkorn, Marco Ferrari, Mutlu Ozcan, Bart Van Meerbeek

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive Strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive Bonding to tooth structure require in vitro Test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a Test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. Methods The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory Test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. Results The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile Bond Strength Test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. Conclusion The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS Test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, Strength-based Test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions.

  • Academy of Dental Materials guidance on in vitro Testing of dental composite Bonding effectiveness to dentin/enamel using micro-tensile Bond Strength (μTBS) approach
    Dental Materials, 2017
    Co-Authors: Steve Armstrong, Luca Breschi, Musa Ozcan, Frank Pfefferkorn, Marco Ferrari, Bart Van Meerbeek

    Abstract:

    Objective An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive Strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive Bonding to tooth structure require in vitro Test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a Test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. Methods The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory Test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. Results The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile Bond Strength Test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. Conclusion The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS Test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, Strength-based Test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions.

  • effect of simulated pulpal pressure on self adhesive cements Bonding to dentin
    Dental Materials, 2008
    Co-Authors: Claudia Mazzitelli, Francesca Monticelli, Raquel Osorio, Alessio Casucci, Manuel Toledano, Marco Ferrari

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives To evaluate the Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive luting cements to dentin in the presence of simulated hydrostatic intrapulpal pressure (PP). Methods Thirty composite overlays (Aelite All Purpose Body) were luted to deep-coronal dentin surfaces using four self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, G-Cem, Multilink Sprint, Bis-Cem) and one total-etch system (Calibra). Half of the specimens resin cements were applied under a PP of 15 cm H2O. After storage in a moist condition for 1 month (37 °C, 100% relative humidity), specimens were sectioned into microtensile beams (1 mm2) and stressed to failure with the microtensile Bond Strength Test (μTBS). Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis ranking (p  Results Bond Strength of Calibra fell significantly when PP was applied during Bonding (p  Significance Simulated PP influences the adhesive performance of resinous cements. The predominance of acid–base reactions or radical polymerization may explain the different behavior of self-adhesive cements when changing substrate wetness. The application of constant intrapulpal perfusion should be considered when simulating luting procedures in vitro.

Alvaro Della Bona – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of thermal compatibility between core and veneer dental ceramics using shear Bond Strength Test and contact angle measurement
    Dental Materials, 2010
    Co-Authors: Paula Benetti, Alvaro Della Bona, Robert J Kelly

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives To Test the hypotheses that shear Bond Strength ( σ s ) and contact angle ( θ ) are influenced by the thermal expansion/contraction behavior of bilayered all-ceramic systems. Methods Glass-infiltrated ceramics (A – In-Ceram ALUMINA) and zirconia-reinforced alumina (Z – In- Ceram ZIRCONIA) were veneered with feldspathic ceramics (7 – VM7; 9 – VM9; 13 – VM13), yielding 6 experimental groups. Surface roughness (Ra) of A and Z core ceramic disks (12 mm diameter × 1.2 mm high) was measured to assure that values were similar. A cylinder of veneer (2 mm diameter × 2 mm high) was fired onto the center of all core disks, cooled under identical conditions and Tested for σ s to failure ( n  = 20). For the θ evaluation ( n  = 10) similar specimens (veneer 1 mm high) were overfired to develop an equilibrium θ that was then measured from digital images (AutoCAD 2006). Published thermal expansion data were used. Results The mean values of σ s (MPa) and θ (°) for the core-veneer ceramic groups were, respectively: A7 (19.4 ± 4.7; 49 ± 4.7); Z7 (23.4 ± 6.2; 56 ± 4.9); A9 (0.9 ± 1.6; 55 ± 5.8); Z9 (9.8 ± 5.7; 59.8 ± 2.9); A13 (0; 70 ± 6.0); Z13 (0; 67.2 ± 6.3). As the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion (coreveneer) increases, the θ value increases ( r  = 0.95) and the σ s value decreases ( r  = −0.92), p  ≤ 0.01. Conclusion The contact angle measurement and the shear Bond Strength Test of core-veneer ceramics are influenced by the thermal expansion behavior of these all-ceramic systems.

  • effect of ceramic surface treatment on tensile Bond Strength to a resin cement
    International Journal of Prosthodontics, 2002
    Co-Authors: Alvaro Della Bona, K J Anusavice, James A A Hood

    Abstract:

    Purpose The objective of this study was to Test the following hypotheses: (1) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated ceramic surfaces produce the highest tensile Bond Strength to resin cements, independent of the ceramic microstructure and composition; and (2) the tensile Bond Strength Test is appropriate for analysis of interfacial adhesion for ceramic-Bonded-to-resin systems. Materials and methods Ceramic specimens were polished with 1-micron alumina abrasive and divided into four groups of 10 specimens for each of seven ceramic types. One of the following surface treatments was applied: (1) 10% ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute; (2) 9.6% HF for 2 minutes; (3) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes; and (4) a silane coupling agent. The surface-treated areas were coated with an adhesive resin and Bonded to a resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a Testing machine. Tensile Bond Strength data were statistically analyzed, and fracture surfaces were examined to determine the mode of failure. Results Silane-treated surfaces showed statistically higher mean tensile Bond Strength values than surfaces treated with any etchant (HF, ABF, APF). HF produced statistically higher mean tensile Bond Strengths than ABF and APF. All failures occurred in the adhesion zone. Conclusion The tensile Bond Strength Test is adequate for analysis of the adhesive zone of resin-ceramic systems. The chemical adhesion produced by silane promoted higher mean Bond Strength values than the micromechanical retention produced by any etchant for the resin-ceramic systems used in this study.

  • Shear vs. Tensile Bond Strength of Resin Composite Bonded to Ceramic
    Journal of Dental Research, 1995
    Co-Authors: Alvaro Della Bona, R. Van Noort

    Abstract:

    Since the mode of failure of resin composites Bonded to ceramics has frequently been reported to be cohesive fracture of either ceramic or resin composite rather than separation at the adhesive interface, this study was designed to question the validity of shear Bond Strength Tests. The reasons for such a failure mode are identified and an alternative tensile Bond Strength Test evaluated. Three configurations (A, conventional; B, reversed; and C, all composite) of the cylinder-on-disc design were produced for shear Bond Strength Testing. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis (FEA) was carried out to determine qualitatively the stress distribution for the three configurations. A tensile Bond Strength Test was designed and used to evaluate two ceramic repair systems, one using hydrofluoric acid (HF) and the other acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF). Results from the shear Bond Strength Tests and FEA showed that this particular Test has as its inherent feature the measurement of the Strength of the …

Bart Van Meerbeek – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Academy of Dental Materials guidance on in vitro Testing of dental composite Bonding effectiveness to dentin/enamel using micro-tensile Bond Strength (μTBS) approach
    Dental Materials, 2017
    Co-Authors: Steve Armstrong, Luca Breschi, Musa Ozcan, Frank Pfefferkorn, Marco Ferrari, Bart Van Meerbeek

    Abstract:

    Objective An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive Strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive Bonding to tooth structure require in vitro Test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a Test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. Methods The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory Test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. Results The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile Bond Strength Test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. Conclusion The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS Test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, Strength-based Test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions.