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Bone Pathology

The Experts below are selected from a list of 273 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

J Geurts – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • What drives osteoarthritis?—synovial versus subchondral Bone Pathology
    Rheumatology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas Hugle, J Geurts

    Abstract:

    Abstract Subchondral Bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and Bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of Bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral Bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral Bone Pathology and their connection in OA.

  • what drives osteoarthritis synovial versus subchondral Bone Pathology
    Rheumatology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas Hugle, J Geurts

    Abstract:

    Abstract Subchondral Bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and Bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of Bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral Bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral Bone Pathology and their connection in OA.

Thomas Hugle – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • What drives osteoarthritis?—synovial versus subchondral Bone Pathology
    Rheumatology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas Hugle, J Geurts

    Abstract:

    Abstract Subchondral Bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and Bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of Bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral Bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral Bone Pathology and their connection in OA.

  • what drives osteoarthritis synovial versus subchondral Bone Pathology
    Rheumatology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Thomas Hugle, J Geurts

    Abstract:

    Abstract Subchondral Bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and Bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of Bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral Bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral Bone Pathology and their connection in OA.

Haruo Saito – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Gustatory Otalgia and Wet Ear Syndrome: A Possible Cross‐Innervation After Ear Surgery
    Laryngoscope, 1999
    Co-Authors: Haruo Saito

    Abstract:

    Hypothesis: The chorda tympani and Arnold’s nerves have close approximation to each other and their cross-innervation is possible after ear surgery.

    Study Design: A retrospective study was performed with a temporal Bone Pathology case and two clinical cases as representatives of such a possibility. Patients had severe otalgia and wet ear during gustatory stimulation.

    Methods: A temporal Bone Pathology case was studied under a light microscope. Earache and/or wet ear were provoked during gustatory stimulation. Wet ear was tested with iodine-starch reaction after the subject tasted lemon juice.

    Results: The temporal Bone specimen has clusters of regenerated fibers in the tympanic cavity in the area of the chorda tympani and Arnold’s nerves, suggesting a possibility of mixing. There are regenerated fibers in the iter chordae anterius, showing successful bridging of the chorda tympani nerves across a long gap. Detachment of the skin over the operated mastoid bowl obscured signs in one clinical case. Another clinical case of gustatory wet ear showed objective evidence of cross-innervation with iodine-starch reaction.

    Conclusion: The detachment procedure and iodine-starch reaction were the proofs that the signs were related to regenerated fibers. This is the first report of gustatory otalgia and wet ear after ear surgery.

  • gustatory otalgia and wet ear syndrome a possible cross innervation after ear surgery
    Laryngoscope, 1999
    Co-Authors: Haruo Saito

    Abstract:

    Hypothesis: The chorda tympani and Arnold’s nerves have close approximation to each other and their cross-innervation is possible after ear surgery.

    Study Design: A retrospective study was performed with a temporal Bone Pathology case and two clinical cases as representatives of such a possibility. Patients had severe otalgia and wet ear during gustatory stimulation.

    Methods: A temporal Bone Pathology case was studied under a light microscope. Earache and/or wet ear were provoked during gustatory stimulation. Wet ear was tested with iodine-starch reaction after the subject tasted lemon juice.

    Results: The temporal Bone specimen has clusters of regenerated fibers in the tympanic cavity in the area of the chorda tympani and Arnold’s nerves, suggesting a possibility of mixing. There are regenerated fibers in the iter chordae anterius, showing successful bridging of the chorda tympani nerves across a long gap. Detachment of the skin over the operated mastoid bowl obscured signs in one clinical case. Another clinical case of gustatory wet ear showed objective evidence of cross-innervation with iodine-starch reaction.

    Conclusion: The detachment procedure and iodine-starch reaction were the proofs that the signs were related to regenerated fibers. This is the first report of gustatory otalgia and wet ear after ear surgery.