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Bowens Disease

The Experts below are selected from a list of 15 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

M. W. Bekkenk – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A squamous cell carcinoma in a young woman with Lynch syndrome
    Familial Cancer, 2019
    Co-Authors: F. Adan, M. B. Crijns, E. Dekker, B. A. J. Bastiaansen, O. Lapid, P. Snaebjornsson, E. H. Rosenberg, M. E. Leerdam, M. W. Bekkenk

    Abstract:

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by a predisposition to colorectal cancer and extracolonic cancers (particularly endometrium, ovary, stomach, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, urothelial tract, brain, and skin). Muir–Torre syndrome (MTS) is considered a phenotypical variant of LS, where patients develop sebaceous neoplasms and keratoacanthomas. Currently, only few studies and case reports suggest an association between LS and other skin cancers, such as BowensDisease, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this case-report we describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with LS and a proven MSH2 germline mutation, presenting with a SCC on the right cheek. Immunohistochemistry lacked MSH2 and MSH6 protein staining. The tumor showed a discordance between immunohistochemistry and micro-satellite instability status, for which a clear explanation cannot be provided yet. To conclude whether this pattern is indicative for SCC occurring in LS patients, further analyses of other LS patients presenting with SCC should be carried out. Our patient’s young age and skin type (Fitzpatrick phototype VI) suggest a possible link between LS and cutaneous SCC.

Kouloulias Vassilis – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the potential role of radiation therapy in Bowens Disease a review of the current literature
    Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials, 2012
    Co-Authors: Zygogianni Anna, Kouvaris John, Tolia Maria, Kyrgias George, Beli Ivelina, Kantzou Ioanna, Soulimioti Georgia, Kouloulias Vassilis

    Abstract:

    Background: Bowens Disease is a form of squamous cell carcinoma in situ that can be transformed into invasive squamous cell carcinoma and should be treated according to its anatomical position. The aim of this article is to offer an overview of treatment options with an emphasis on radiation therapy in the treatment of Bowens Disease. Methods and Materials: We performed overview of the literature based on database searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and we included articles till December 2010. Only papers published in English were included. Results: There was no standard fractionation regimen: some physicians prescribed high doses, such as the ones of invasive skin cancer, whereas others prescribed lower doses because of the noninvasive nature of the Disease, the sensitive anatomic location (e.g., extremity) and the large treatment area. Various studies demonstrate high rates of tumor control with minimal morbidity following definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of Bowens Disease. Through a multidisciplinary assessment, the treatment of Bowens Disease can be individualized to optimize patient care. Conclusions: Radiation therapy is an effective treatment option for Bowens Disease of the skin. Local recurrences seem to be equally low in patients treated with high- and low-dose regimens. Radiotherapy preserves normal tissues ensuring a superior esthetic and functional outcome.

F. Adan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A squamous cell carcinoma in a young woman with Lynch syndrome
    Familial Cancer, 2019
    Co-Authors: F. Adan, M. B. Crijns, E. Dekker, B. A. J. Bastiaansen, O. Lapid, P. Snaebjornsson, E. H. Rosenberg, M. E. Leerdam, M. W. Bekkenk

    Abstract:

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by a predisposition to colorectal cancer and extracolonic cancers (particularly endometrium, ovary, stomach, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, urothelial tract, brain, and skin). Muir–Torre syndrome (MTS) is considered a phenotypical variant of LS, where patients develop sebaceous neoplasms and keratoacanthomas. Currently, only few studies and case reports suggest an association between LS and other skin cancers, such as BowensDisease, melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this case-report we describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with LS and a proven MSH2 germline mutation, presenting with a SCC on the right cheek. Immunohistochemistry lacked MSH2 and MSH6 protein staining. The tumor showed a discordance between immunohistochemistry and micro-satellite instability status, for which a clear explanation cannot be provided yet. To conclude whether this pattern is indicative for SCC occurring in LS patients, further analyses of other LS patients presenting with SCC should be carried out. Our patient’s young age and skin type (Fitzpatrick phototype VI) suggest a possible link between LS and cutaneous SCC.