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Breast Cancer Prevention

The Experts below are selected from a list of 8226 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Cynthia Kratzke – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Ethnic differences in Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking among rural women: will provider mobile messages work?
    Journal of Cancer Education, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Susan L Wilson

    Abstract:

    Although growing research supports Cancer survivor information-seeking, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking among women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in Breast Cancer risk factor knowledge, information sources, and desired mobile messages among Hispanic and non-Hispanic rural women. Women were recruited to complete a survey at an imaging center during a mammography screening visit. A total of 156 women (mean age = 61, SD = 12.07) completed the survey. Breast Cancer risk factor knowledge was significantly higher for non-Hispanic women compared to Hispanic women (p = .035). Television, magazines, and Internet were the most frequent information sources. Providers were the most frequent interpersonal information source. Nearly 87 % used cell phones and 47 % used texting. Hispanic women were more likely to desire Breast Cancer Prevention cell voice messages (p < .001) and text messages (p = .001) compared to non-Hispanic women. No significant differences were found for text appointment reminders by ethnicity. Health educators and clinicians must promote mobile messages for Hispanics and non-Hispanics for mammography adherence, Breast Cancer Prevention education, and best practices to manage screening appointments.

  • Differences Among College Women for Breast Cancer Prevention Acquired Information-Seeking, Desired Apps and Texts, and Daughter-Initiated Information to Mothers
    Journal of Community Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Anup Amatya, Hugo Vilchis

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine among college women acquired Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and information given to mothers. Using a cross-sectional study, a survey was administered to college women at a southwestern university. College women (n = 546) used the Internet (44 %) for active Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking and used the Internet (74 %), magazines (69 %), and television (59 %) for passive information receipt. Over half of the participants desired Breast Cancer Prevention apps (54 %) and texts (51 %). Logistic regression analyses revealed predictors for interest to receive apps were ethnicity (Hispanic), lower self-efficacy, actively seeking online information, and older age and predictors for interest to receive texts were lower self-efficacy and higher university level. Eighteen percent of college women (n = 99) reported giving information to mothers and reported in an open-ended item the types of information given to mothers. Predictors for giving information to mothers were actively and passively seeking online information, Breast self-exam practice, and higher university level. Screenings were the most frequent types of information given to mothers. Breast Cancer Prevention information using apps, texts, or Internet and daughter-initiated information for mothers should be considered in health promotion targeting college students or young women in communities. Future research is needed to examine the quality of apps, texts, and online information and cultural differences for Breast Cancer Prevention sources.

  • Breast Cancer Prevention Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors Among College Women and Mother–Daughter Communication
    Journal of Community Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Hugo Vilchis, Anup Amatya

    Abstract:

    Although Breast Cancer Prevention targets mostly women ages 40 and older, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention for young women and mother’s advice. The purpose of this study was to examine Breast Cancer Prevention knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among college women and mother-daughter communica- tion. Hispanic and non-Hispanic students at a southwestern university completed a Breast Cancer Prevention survey with items for mother’s advice, Breast self-awareness and risk reduction knowledge, self-efficacy, susceptibility, family history, provider Breast self-exam (BSE) recom- mendation, peer norms, BSE practice, and demographics. An openended item was also used to elicit types of mother’s advice. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors for receiving mother’s advice for Breast Cancer Prevention and BSE practice. Self-reported data using a survey were obtained from 546 college women with a mean age of 23.3 (SD = 7.75). Nearly 36 % received mothers’ advice and 55 % conducted BSE. Predictors for receiving mother’s advice were age, self-efficacy, and family history of Breast Cancer. Predictors for BSE practice were mother’s advice, age, self-efficacy, and provider BSE recommendation. Family history of Breast Cancer and knowledge were not significant predictors for BSE prac- tice. Findings support the need for clinicians, community health educators, and mothers to provide Breast Cancer Prevention education targeting college women.

Hugo Vilchis – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Differences Among College Women for Breast Cancer Prevention Acquired Information-Seeking, Desired Apps and Texts, and Daughter-Initiated Information to Mothers
    Journal of Community Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Anup Amatya, Hugo Vilchis

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine among college women acquired Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and information given to mothers. Using a cross-sectional study, a survey was administered to college women at a southwestern university. College women (n = 546) used the Internet (44 %) for active Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking and used the Internet (74 %), magazines (69 %), and television (59 %) for passive information receipt. Over half of the participants desired Breast Cancer Prevention apps (54 %) and texts (51 %). Logistic regression analyses revealed predictors for interest to receive apps were ethnicity (Hispanic), lower self-efficacy, actively seeking online information, and older age and predictors for interest to receive texts were lower self-efficacy and higher university level. Eighteen percent of college women (n = 99) reported giving information to mothers and reported in an open-ended item the types of information given to mothers. Predictors for giving information to mothers were actively and passively seeking online information, Breast self-exam practice, and higher university level. Screenings were the most frequent types of information given to mothers. Breast Cancer Prevention information using apps, texts, or Internet and daughter-initiated information for mothers should be considered in health promotion targeting college students or young women in communities. Future research is needed to examine the quality of apps, texts, and online information and cultural differences for Breast Cancer Prevention sources.

  • Breast Cancer Prevention Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors Among College Women and Mother–Daughter Communication
    Journal of Community Health, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Hugo Vilchis, Anup Amatya

    Abstract:

    Although Breast Cancer Prevention targets mostly women ages 40 and older, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention for young women and mother’s advice. The purpose of this study was to examine Breast Cancer Prevention knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among college women and mother-daughter communica- tion. Hispanic and non-Hispanic students at a southwestern university completed a Breast Cancer Prevention survey with items for mother’s advice, Breast self-awareness and risk reduction knowledge, self-efficacy, susceptibility, family history, provider Breast self-exam (BSE) recom- mendation, peer norms, BSE practice, and demographics. An openended item was also used to elicit types of mother’s advice. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors for receiving mother’s advice for Breast Cancer Prevention and BSE practice. Self-reported data using a survey were obtained from 546 college women with a mean age of 23.3 (SD = 7.75). Nearly 36 % received mothers’ advice and 55 % conducted BSE. Predictors for receiving mother’s advice were age, self-efficacy, and family history of Breast Cancer. Predictors for BSE practice were mother’s advice, age, self-efficacy, and provider BSE recommendation. Family history of Breast Cancer and knowledge were not significant predictors for BSE prac- tice. Findings support the need for clinicians, community health educators, and mothers to provide Breast Cancer Prevention education targeting college women.

  • Reaching rural women: Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors and interest in Internet, cell phone, and text use.
    Journal of Community Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Susan L Wilson, Hugo Vilchis

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women, the prevalence of Internet, cell, and text use, and interest to receive Breast Cancer Prevention information cell and text messages. While growing literature for Breast Cancer information sources supports the use of the Internet, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women and mobile technology. Using a cross-sectional study design, data were collected using a survey. McGuire’s Input–Ouput Model was used as the framework. Self-reported data were obtained from a convenience sample of 157 women with a mean age of 60 (SD = 12.12) at a rural New Mexico imaging center. Common interpersonal information sources were doctors, nurses, and friends and common channel information sources were television, magazines, and Internet. Overall, 87 % used cell phones, 20 % had an interest to receive cell phone Breast Cancer Prevention messages, 47 % used text messaging, 36 % had an interest to receive text Breast Cancer Prevention messages, and 37 % had an interest to receive mammogram reminder text messages. Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between age, income, and race/ethnicity and use of cell phones or text messaging. There were no differences between age and receiving text messages or text mammogram reminders. Assessment of health information seeking behaviors is important for community health educators to target populations for program development. Future research may identify additional socio-cultural differences.

Susan L Wilson – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Ethnic differences in Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking among rural women: will provider mobile messages work?
    Journal of Cancer Education, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Susan L Wilson

    Abstract:

    Although growing research supports Cancer survivor information-seeking, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention information-seeking among women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in Breast Cancer risk factor knowledge, information sources, and desired mobile messages among Hispanic and non-Hispanic rural women. Women were recruited to complete a survey at an imaging center during a mammography screening visit. A total of 156 women (mean age = 61, SD = 12.07) completed the survey. Breast Cancer risk factor knowledge was significantly higher for non-Hispanic women compared to Hispanic women (p = .035). Television, magazines, and Internet were the most frequent information sources. Providers were the most frequent interpersonal information source. Nearly 87 % used cell phones and 47 % used texting. Hispanic women were more likely to desire Breast Cancer Prevention cell voice messages (p < .001) and text messages (p = .001) compared to non-Hispanic women. No significant differences were found for text appointment reminders by ethnicity. Health educators and clinicians must promote mobile messages for Hispanics and non-Hispanics for mammography adherence, Breast Cancer Prevention education, and best practices to manage screening appointments.

  • Reaching rural women: Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors and interest in Internet, cell phone, and text use.
    Journal of Community Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Cynthia Kratzke, Susan L Wilson, Hugo Vilchis

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to examine the Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women, the prevalence of Internet, cell, and text use, and interest to receive Breast Cancer Prevention information cell and text messages. While growing literature for Breast Cancer information sources supports the use of the Internet, little is known about Breast Cancer Prevention information seeking behaviors among rural women and mobile technology. Using a cross-sectional study design, data were collected using a survey. McGuire’s Input–Ouput Model was used as the framework. Self-reported data were obtained from a convenience sample of 157 women with a mean age of 60 (SD = 12.12) at a rural New Mexico imaging center. Common interpersonal information sources were doctors, nurses, and friends and common channel information sources were television, magazines, and Internet. Overall, 87 % used cell phones, 20 % had an interest to receive cell phone Breast Cancer Prevention messages, 47 % used text messaging, 36 % had an interest to receive text Breast Cancer Prevention messages, and 37 % had an interest to receive mammogram reminder text messages. Bivariate analysis revealed significant differences between age, income, and race/ethnicity and use of cell phones or text messaging. There were no differences between age and receiving text messages or text mammogram reminders. Assessment of health information seeking behaviors is important for community health educators to target populations for program development. Future research may identify additional socio-cultural differences.