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Brief Psychotherapy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 180 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Rayna D Markin – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the unfolding of the real relationship and the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy
    Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Charles J Gelso, Dennis M Kivlighan, Johnna Busaknepp, Eric B Spiegel, Ann M Hummel, Yueher Emilie, Rayna D Markin

    Abstract:

    : This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients’ and therapists’ ratings of the real relationship were associated with outcome. Forty-two clients and their therapists (n = 19) at 2 university counseling centers completed measures assessing the strength of their real relationship after every session of Brief Psychotherapy. They also completed an outcome measure at the end of treatment. Clients’ ratings of the real relationship after the first session, first quarter of treatment, and after all sessions combined related to outcomes. Therapists’ ratings of the real relationship at these time points did not relate to outcome. However, increases over time in therapists’ ratings of real relationship strength, as well as increasing convergence with clients’ ratings of the real relationship, did relate to outcome. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Charles J Gelso – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the unfolding of the real relationship and the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy
    Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Charles J Gelso, Dennis M Kivlighan, Johnna Busaknepp, Eric B Spiegel, Ann M Hummel, Yueher Emilie, Rayna D Markin

    Abstract:

    : This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients’ and therapists’ ratings of the real relationship were associated with outcome. Forty-two clients and their therapists (n = 19) at 2 university counseling centers completed measures assessing the strength of their real relationship after every session of Brief Psychotherapy. They also completed an outcome measure at the end of treatment. Clients’ ratings of the real relationship after the first session, first quarter of treatment, and after all sessions combined related to outcomes. Therapists’ ratings of the real relationship at these time points did not relate to outcome. However, increases over time in therapists’ ratings of real relationship strength, as well as increasing convergence with clients’ ratings of the real relationship, did relate to outcome. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

  • relation of the real relationship and the working alliance to the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy
    Psychotherapy, 2011
    Co-Authors: Gianluca Lo Coco, Salvatore Gullo, C Prestano, Charles J Gelso

    Abstract:

    : In this study, the (a) association of the client- and therapist-rated strength of the real relationship to the outcome of Brief Psychotherapy, and (b) extent to which the real relationship predicted outcome above and beyond the predictive power of the working alliance were examined. A total of 50 clients at the counseling center of a university in Italy received Brief therapy and completed measures before treatment, after the third session, and at the end of treatment. From the clients’ perspective, both the Genuineness element of the real relationship and the Bond scale of the working alliance were found to relate significantly to treatment outcome. When we examined the real relationship and working alliance as predictors in a hierarchical regression format, the client-rated real relationship, especially the Genuineness element, did predict outcome and, moreover, added significantly and substantially to the working alliance in predicting outcome. Neither the strength of the real relationship from the therapist’s perspective nor the therapist-rated working alliance was found to relate to outcome. The findings are discussed in the context of methodological differences with other investigations of the real relationship.

M Viederman – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • psychodynamic intervention in Brief Psychotherapy
    European Psychiatry, 2016
    Co-Authors: M Viederman

    Abstract:

    This paper will describe a framework for an intensive psychotherapeutic intervention useful in consultation and its extension in Brief Psychotherapy. The approach is designed to address symptomatic expressions of distress that arise as the expression of unconscious conflict provoked by situations of crisis. It may also be a model for selected patients in longer therapies that address ongoing problems. This therapeutic approach has elements familiar to any experienced therapist, but is specific in its conceptualization. What distinguishes this therapy from others is the induction and utilization of a special positive quality in the therapeutic relationship as a therapeutic aim and “curative factor” in its own right beyond its role as the substrate for a trusting relationship that underlies all successful psychotherapeutic elements. This involves a specific strategy and technique designed to develop a “benevolent transference” to effect change, sometimes to achieve symptom relief, sometimes as a precursor to meaningful insight. In this respect the relationship, considered to be a central feature of the therapy, compliments understanding as a vehicle for change. A variety of interventions are described to facilitate this process and are illustrated in case presentations. This presentation is a synthesis of a number of papers on active engagement of the patient in psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Two DVDs that illustrate this approach in consultations with patients are available for presentation. One is a three-session Psychotherapy with an eight-month follow-up. The patient interviews are edited and may be the focus of separate sessions.