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Broadcasting Industry

The Experts below are selected from a list of 306 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Michele Polo – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • beyond the spectrum constraint concentration and entry in the Broadcasting Industry
    Rivista di Politica Economica, 2001
    Co-Authors: Massimo Motta, Michele Polo

    Abstract:

    The Broadcasting Industry is still very concentrated all over the world, after 15 years in which new technologies and public policies allowed to overcome the constraint of limited availability of frequencies on the radio spectrum. We argue that the monopolistic competition set up, traditionally used to analyze the Broadcasting Industry, does not fit the empirical evidence. Instead we analyze the free entry equilibrium in a multistage game in which the decision on program quality (attractiveness) is crucial and the associated fixed costs are endogenously determined. We show that concentration might arise in the long run even in large markets despite entry is free.(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

  • concentration and public policies in the Broadcasting Industry the future of television
    Economic Policy, 1997
    Co-Authors: Massimo Motta, Michele Polo

    Abstract:

    New technologies are deeply transforming the Broadcasting Industry. What we have seen so far is only the beginning of a long story. Inevitably, Industry regulations must adapt, which means that a wide-ranging rethink of current practices is required. In order to assess the likely evolution of the Industry, this article decomposes it into a number of components, from conception of programmes to their Broadcasting, including distribution, storage and licensing. Contrary to popular expectations, the analysis suggests that the current high degree of concentration will, if anything, increase. The policy implication is that regulation, so far driven by now obsolete technological constraints, should increasingly emphasize promoting competition. Copyright Centre for Economic Policy Research, Centre for Economic Studies, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme 1997.

Benoit Pierre Freyens – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • royalties entry and spectrum allocation to the Broadcasting Industry a corrigendum
    Journal of Public Economic Theory, 2018
    Co-Authors: Amnon Levy, Michael R Caputo, Benoit Pierre Freyens

    Abstract:

    The purpose of the corrigendum is to correct the list of authors to a previously published article in Journal of Public Economic Theory.

  • royalties entry and spectrum allocation to the Broadcasting Industry
    Journal of Public Economic Theory, 2017
    Co-Authors: Michael R Caputo, Benoit Pierre Freyens

    Abstract:

    We characterize the socially optimal trajectory of spectrum royalty and firm entry in a deregulated over-the-air Broadcasting Industry. A social planner maximizes consumers’ lifetime utility by setting royalties for the use of publicly owned spectrum. As the number of broadcasters adjusts to profits over time, the quality of service improves through greater variety but also deteriorates through intensified interferences. Contrary to observed consolidation and return to concentration in past deregulatory reforms, we find that optimal royalty control that accounts for these quality effects steers the socially optimal trajectory of royalties and firms to a more competitive steady state.

Massimo Motta – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • beyond the spectrum constraint concentration and entry in the Broadcasting Industry
    Rivista di Politica Economica, 2001
    Co-Authors: Massimo Motta, Michele Polo

    Abstract:

    The Broadcasting Industry is still very concentrated all over the world, after 15 years in which new technologies and public policies allowed to overcome the constraint of limited availability of frequencies on the radio spectrum. We argue that the monopolistic competition set up, traditionally used to analyze the Broadcasting Industry, does not fit the empirical evidence. Instead we analyze the free entry equilibrium in a multistage game in which the decision on program quality (attractiveness) is crucial and the associated fixed costs are endogenously determined. We show that concentration might arise in the long run even in large markets despite entry is free.(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

  • concentration and public policies in the Broadcasting Industry the future of television
    Economic Policy, 1997
    Co-Authors: Massimo Motta, Michele Polo

    Abstract:

    New technologies are deeply transforming the Broadcasting Industry. What we have seen so far is only the beginning of a long story. Inevitably, Industry regulations must adapt, which means that a wide-ranging rethink of current practices is required. In order to assess the likely evolution of the Industry, this article decomposes it into a number of components, from conception of programmes to their Broadcasting, including distribution, storage and licensing. Contrary to popular expectations, the analysis suggests that the current high degree of concentration will, if anything, increase. The policy implication is that regulation, so far driven by now obsolete technological constraints, should increasingly emphasize promoting competition. Copyright Centre for Economic Policy Research, Centre for Economic Studies, Maison des Sciences de l’Homme 1997.