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Broth Dilution

The Experts below are selected from a list of 228 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Nele Wellinghausen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Comparison of direct disk diffusion and standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of blood culture isolates.
    Journal of medical microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Andreas Edelmann, Tim Pietzcker, Nele Wellinghausen

    Abstract:

    Bloodstream infections are life-threatening conditions which require timely initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The accuracy of direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures was investigated, including for the first time beta-lactam/beta-lactam-inhibitor combination antibiotics. Results of direct testing, following the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, were compared to standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of the subcultured isolate on the Merlin MICRONAUT system. Altogether, 758 isolates and 4930 organism/antibiotic combinations from 590 patients were evaluated. With regard to Gram-positive cocci (n=532), agreement between both methods was found in 93.9% of cases, with 1.6% very major, 1.1% major and 2.6% minor errors. For Gram-negative rods (n=226), agreement was found in 91.9% of cases, with 1.2% very major, 0.7% major and 6.3% minor errors. When applying the breakpoints of the Deutsches Institut für Normung for interpretation of MICRONAUT tests, agreement of direct disk diffusion with standard testing decreased to 82.4% in Gram-negative rods, with 3.6% very major, 0.5% major and 13.4% minor errors. A high rate of disagreement was observed with oxacillin and gentamicin in Gram-positive cocci, and with cefuroxime, amoxycillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam in Gram-negative rods. In conclusion, the limitations of direct disk diffusion testing of positive blood cultures must be kept in mind by the clinical microbiologist and should, where necessary, be communicated to the clinician to ensure adequate treatment of severely ill patients.

  • comparison of direct disk diffusion and standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of blood culture isolates
    Journal of Medical Microbiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Andreas Edelmann, Tim Pietzcker, Nele Wellinghausen

    Abstract:

    Bloodstream infections are life-threatening conditions which require timely initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The accuracy of direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures was investigated, including for the first time β-lactam/β-lactam-inhibitor combination antibiotics. Results of direct testing, following the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, were compared to standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of the subcultured isolate on the Merlin MICRONAUT system. Altogether, 758 isolates and 4930 organism/antibiotic combinations from 590 patients were evaluated. With regard to Gram-positive cocci (n=532), agreement between both methods was found in 93.9 % of cases, with 1.6 % very major, 1.1 % major and 2.6 % minor errors. For Gram-negative rods (n=226), agreement was found in 91.9 % of cases, with 1.2 % very major, 0.7 % major and 6.3 % minor errors. When applying the breakpoints of the Deutsches Institut fur Normung for interpretation of MICRONAUT tests, agreement of direct disk diffusion with standard testing decreased to 82.4 % in Gram-negative rods, with 3.6 % very major, 0.5 % major and 13.4 % minor errors. A high rate of disagreement was observed with oxacillin and gentamicin in Gram-positive cocci, and with cefuroxime, amoxycillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam in Gram-negative rods. In conclusion, the limitations of direct disk diffusion testing of positive blood cultures must be kept in mind by the clinical microbiologist and should, where necessary, be communicated to the clinician to ensure adequate treatment of severely ill patients.

Andreas Edelmann – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Comparison of direct disk diffusion and standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of blood culture isolates.
    Journal of medical microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Andreas Edelmann, Tim Pietzcker, Nele Wellinghausen

    Abstract:

    Bloodstream infections are life-threatening conditions which require timely initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The accuracy of direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures was investigated, including for the first time beta-lactam/beta-lactam-inhibitor combination antibiotics. Results of direct testing, following the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, were compared to standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of the subcultured isolate on the Merlin MICRONAUT system. Altogether, 758 isolates and 4930 organism/antibiotic combinations from 590 patients were evaluated. With regard to Gram-positive cocci (n=532), agreement between both methods was found in 93.9% of cases, with 1.6% very major, 1.1% major and 2.6% minor errors. For Gram-negative rods (n=226), agreement was found in 91.9% of cases, with 1.2% very major, 0.7% major and 6.3% minor errors. When applying the breakpoints of the Deutsches Institut für Normung for interpretation of MICRONAUT tests, agreement of direct disk diffusion with standard testing decreased to 82.4% in Gram-negative rods, with 3.6% very major, 0.5% major and 13.4% minor errors. A high rate of disagreement was observed with oxacillin and gentamicin in Gram-positive cocci, and with cefuroxime, amoxycillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam in Gram-negative rods. In conclusion, the limitations of direct disk diffusion testing of positive blood cultures must be kept in mind by the clinical microbiologist and should, where necessary, be communicated to the clinician to ensure adequate treatment of severely ill patients.

  • comparison of direct disk diffusion and standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of blood culture isolates
    Journal of Medical Microbiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Andreas Edelmann, Tim Pietzcker, Nele Wellinghausen

    Abstract:

    Bloodstream infections are life-threatening conditions which require timely initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The accuracy of direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures was investigated, including for the first time β-lactam/β-lactam-inhibitor combination antibiotics. Results of direct testing, following the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, were compared to standard microtitre Broth Dilution susceptibility testing of the subcultured isolate on the Merlin MICRONAUT system. Altogether, 758 isolates and 4930 organism/antibiotic combinations from 590 patients were evaluated. With regard to Gram-positive cocci (n=532), agreement between both methods was found in 93.9 % of cases, with 1.6 % very major, 1.1 % major and 2.6 % minor errors. For Gram-negative rods (n=226), agreement was found in 91.9 % of cases, with 1.2 % very major, 0.7 % major and 6.3 % minor errors. When applying the breakpoints of the Deutsches Institut fur Normung for interpretation of MICRONAUT tests, agreement of direct disk diffusion with standard testing decreased to 82.4 % in Gram-negative rods, with 3.6 % very major, 0.5 % major and 13.4 % minor errors. A high rate of disagreement was observed with oxacillin and gentamicin in Gram-positive cocci, and with cefuroxime, amoxycillin/clavulanate and piperacillin/tazobactam in Gram-negative rods. In conclusion, the limitations of direct disk diffusion testing of positive blood cultures must be kept in mind by the clinical microbiologist and should, where necessary, be communicated to the clinician to ensure adequate treatment of severely ill patients.

William W Hope – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • eucast technical note on the eucast definitive document edef 7 2 method for the determination of Broth Dilution minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents for yeasts edef 7 2 eucast afst
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 2012
    Co-Authors: M C Arendrup, Manuel Cuencaestrella, Cornelia Lassflorl, William W Hope

    Abstract:

    Abstract The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing-Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST-AFST) has revised the EDef 7.1 document on the method for the determination of Broth Dilution minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents for fermentative yeasts. Changes are: dimethylsulphoxide is now the recommended solvent for caspofungin, micafungin and fluconazole; the shelf-life of plates containing the echinocandins prepared from stock solutions in dimethylsulphoxide is extended to 6 months at −80°C; testing of amphotericin and Cryptococcus has been incorporated; and minimum inhibitory concentration ranges for quality control strains and anidulafungin are included.