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Bulbus cordis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 114 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Margaret L. Kirby – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Hemodynamic Changes and Compensatory Mechanisms during Early Cardiogenesis after Neural Crest Ablation in Chick Embryos
    Pediatric Research, 1991
    Co-Authors: Linda Leatherbury, David M Connuck, Harold E Gauldin, Margaret L. Kirby

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT: Microcinephotography was used to study early heart development in chick embryos with ablations of the neural crest known to result in persistent truncus arteriosus with associated aortic arch anomalies. The premigratory neural crest destined for the 3rd and 4th pharyngeal arches and the aorticopulmonary septum were ablated. When the embryos reached the looped cardiac tube stage (stage 18), 15 experimental and 15 control embryos were filmed at 100 frames/s under controlled environmental conditions. End-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions were determined for the conotruncus and presumptive right ventricle that together compose the Bulbus cordis. The results showed that the shortening fractions and ejection fractions were significantly depressed in the experimental embryos. The experimental embryos exhibited dilation and decreased emptying of the ventricle. There was no difference in heart rate or stroke volume between the control and experimental embryos. Thus, the calculated cardiac output was the same in the control and experimental groups. It appeared that the experimental embryos compensated for decreased contractility by ventricular dilation. These functional compensations in very early cardiac development may play an etiologic role in the subsequent development of structural heart defects.

  • Microcinephotography of the developing heart in neural crest-ablated chick embryos.
    Circulation, 1990
    Co-Authors: Linda Leatherbury, Harold E Gauldin, Karen L. Waldo, Margaret L. Kirby

    Abstract:

    Microcinephotography was used to study heart development in a neural crest model of heart defects, that is, persistent truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch, double outlet right ventricle, or single ventricle and tricuspid valve anomalies. These defects were created in chick embryos by ablation of premigratory neural crest destined for the aorticopulmonary and truncal septa, as well as the third and fourth aortic arch arteries. When embryogenesis reached the looped cardiac tube stage of development (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 18), 19 experimental and 15 control embryos were filmed at 100 frames per second under controlled environmental conditions. Analysis of the microcinephotography films showed the following significant distinguishing characteristics of the developing heart in the experimental embryos: altered conotruncal shape in 100%, depressed contractility and dilation of the primitive ventricle in 84%, decreased emptying of the Bulbus cordis in 79%, incompetent truncal cushions in 68%, incomple…

Yasuhito Shirai – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The expression of diacylglycerol kinase theta during the organogenesis of mouse embryos
    BMC Developmental Biology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Shuji Ueda, Becky Tu-sekine, Minoru Yamanoue, Daniel M Raben, Yasuhito Shirai

    Abstract:

    Background Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is a key enzyme that regulates diacylglycerol (DG) turnover and is involved in a variety of physiological functions. The isoform DGKθ has a unique domain structure and is the sole member of type V DGK. To reveal the spatial and temporal expression of DGKθ we performed immunohistochemical staining on paraffin sections of mouse embryos. Results At an early stage of development (E10.5 and 11.5), the expression of DGKθ was prominently detected in the brain, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion, and limb bud, and was also moderately detected in the Bulbus cordis and the primordium of the liver and gut. At later stages (E12.5 and 14.5), DGKθ expression persisted or increased in the neocortex, epithalamus, hypothalamus, medulla oblongata, and pons. DGKθ was also evident in the epidermis, and nearly all epithelia of the oropharyngeal membrane, digestive tract, and bronchea. At prenatal developmental stages (E16.5 and E18.5), the expression pattern of DGKθ was maintained in the central nervous system, intestine, and kidney, but was attenuated in the differentiated epidermis. Conclusion These results suggest that DGKθ may play important physiological roles not only in the brain, but also in diverse organs and tissues during the embryonic stages.

  • The expression of diacylglycerol kinase theta during the organogenesis of mouse embryos.
    BMC Developmental Biology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Shuji Ueda, Becky Tu-sekine, Minoru Yamanoue, Daniel M Raben, Yasuhito Shirai

    Abstract:

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is a key enzyme that regulates diacylglycerol (DG) turnover and is involved in a variety of physiological functions. The isoform DGKθ has a unique domain structure and is the sole member of type V DGK. To reveal the spatial and temporal expression of DGKθ we performed immunohistochemical staining on paraffin sections of mouse embryos. At an early stage of development (E10.5 and 11.5), the expression of DGKθ was prominently detected in the brain, spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion, and limb bud, and was also moderately detected in the Bulbus cordis and the primordium of the liver and gut. At later stages (E12.5 and 14.5), DGKθ expression persisted or increased in the neocortex, epithalamus, hypothalamus, medulla oblongata, and pons. DGKθ was also evident in the epidermis, and nearly all epithelia of the oropharyngeal membrane, digestive tract, and bronchea. At prenatal developmental stages (E16.5 and E18.5), the expression pattern of DGKθ was maintained in the central nervous system, intestine, and kidney, but was attenuated in the differentiated epidermis. These results suggest that DGKθ may play important physiological roles not only in the brain, but also in diverse organs and tissues during the embryonic stages.

Takeshi Kasajima – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • apoptosis and dna fragmentation in the Bulbus cordis of the developing rat heart
    Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, 1996
    Co-Authors: Kazuyo Takeda, Zuxi Yu, Toshio Nishikawa, Masato Tanaka, Saichi Hosoda, Victor J Ferrans, Takeshi Kasajima

    Abstract:

    Abstract Histologic, ultrastructural and nick end labeling studies were made of the process of apoptosis in the Bulbus cordis of rat embryos. Apoptosis was observed between the 14th and 16th days of gestational age, at which time the Bulbus cordis undergoes extensive remodeling. Three types of mesenchymal cells were identified in this region: cells undergoing apoptosis, cells engaging in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, and cells not involved in either of these two processes. Fragmentation of DNA, demonstrated by nick end labeling, was found only in the apoptotic cells. The combined use of morphologic and labeling techniques is extremely useful in the evaluation of the contribution of apoptosis to cardiac morphogenesis.