Burkholderia glumae - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Burkholderia glumae

The Experts below are selected from a list of 669 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ingyu Hwang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Quorum Sensing-Independent Cellulase-Sensitive Pellicle Formation Is Critical for Colonization of Burkholderia glumae in Rice Plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air–liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28°C than at the optimum growth temperature (37°C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • quorum sensing independent cellulase sensitive pellicle formation is critical for colonization of Burkholderia glumae in rice plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28 degrees C than at the optimum growth temperature (37 degrees C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • Disappearance of Quorum Sensing in Burkholderia glumae During Experimental Evolution
    Microbial Ecology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Gopalsamy Gnanasekaran, Jae Yun Lim, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    The plant pathogen Burkholderia glumae uses quorum sensing (QS) that allows bacteria to share information and alter gene expression on the basis of cell density. The wild-type strain of B. glumae produces quorum-sensing signals (autoinducers) to detect their community and upregulate QS-dependent genes across the population for performing social and group behaviors. The model organism B. glumae was selected to investigate adaptation, estimate evolutionary parameters, and test diverse evolutionary hypotheses by using experimental evolution. The wild-type B. glumae virulent strain showed genotypic changes during regular subculture due to oxygen limitation. The laboratory-evolved clones failed to produce the signaling molecule of C8-HSL/C6-HSL for activation of the quorum-sensing system. Further, the laboratory-evolved clones failed to produce catalase and oxalate for protecting themselves from the toxic environment at stationary phase and phytotoxins (toxoflavin) for infecting rice grain, respectively. The laboratory-evolved clones were completely sequenced and compared with the wild-type. Sequencing analysis of the evolved clones revealed that mutations in QS-responsible genes ( iclR ), sensor genes ( shk , mcp ), and signaling genes ( luxR ) were responsible for quorum-sensing activity failure. The experimental results and sequencing analysis revealed quorum-sensing process failure in the laboratory-evolved clones. In conclusion, the wild-type B. glumae strain was often exposed to oxidative stress during regular subculture and evolved as an avirulent strain (quorum-sensing mutant) by losing the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

Yong Sung Kang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • quorum sensing independent cellulase sensitive pellicle formation is critical for colonization of Burkholderia glumae in rice plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28 degrees C than at the optimum growth temperature (37 degrees C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • Quorum Sensing-Independent Cellulase-Sensitive Pellicle Formation Is Critical for Colonization of Burkholderia glumae in Rice Plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air–liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28°C than at the optimum growth temperature (37°C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • unraveling the role of quorum sensing dependent metabolic homeostasis of the activated methyl cycle in a cooperative population of Burkholderia glumae
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yong Sung Kang, Jae Hyung An, Hyesung Jeong, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    The activated methyl cycle (AMC) is responsible for the generation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is a substrate of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) synthases. However, it is unknown whether AHL-mediated quorum sensing (QS) plays a role in the metabolic flux of the AMC to ensure cell density-dependent biosynthesis of AHL in cooperative populations. Here we show that QS controls metabolic homeostasis of the AMC critical for AHL biosynthesis and cellular methylation in Burkholderia glumae, the causal agent of rice panicle blight. Activation of genes encoding SAM-dependent methyltransferases, S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) hydrolase, and methionine synthases involved in the AMC by QS is essential for maintaining the optimal concentrations of methionine, SAM, and SAH required for bacterial cooperativity as cell density increases. Thus, the absence of QS perturbed metabolic homeostasis of the AMC and caused pleiotropic phenotypes in B. glumae. A null mutation in the SAH hydrolase gene negatively affected AHL and ATP biosynthesis and the activity of SAM-dependent methyltransferases including ToxA, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a key virulence factor toxoflavin in B. glumae. These results indicate that QS controls metabolic flux of the AMC to secure the biosynthesis of AHL and cellular methylation in a cooperative population.

Ok Hee Choi – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • quorum sensing independent cellulase sensitive pellicle formation is critical for colonization of Burkholderia glumae in rice plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28 degrees C than at the optimum growth temperature (37 degrees C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • Quorum Sensing-Independent Cellulase-Sensitive Pellicle Formation Is Critical for Colonization of Burkholderia glumae in Rice Plants
    Frontiers in Microbiology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Giyoung Kwak, Ok Hee Choi, Yong Sung Kang, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Bacteria form biofilms as a means to adapt to environmental changes for survival. Pellicle is a floating biofilm formed at the air–liquid interface in static culture conditions; however, its functional roles have received relatively little attention compared to solid surface-associated biofilms in gram-negative bacteria. Here we show that the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae BGR1 forms cellulase-sensitive pellicles in a bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP)- and flagellum-dependent, but quorum sensing (QS)-independent, manner. Pellicle formation was more favorable at 28°C than at the optimum growth temperature (37°C), and was facilitated by constitutive expression of pelI, a diguanylate cyclase gene from B. glumae, or pleD, the GGDEF response regulator from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Constitutive expression of pelI or pleD raised the levels of c-di-GMP, facilitated pellicle formation, and suppressed swarming motility in B. glumae. QS-defective mutants of B. glumae formed pellicles, while flagellum-defective mutants did not. Pellicles of B. glumae were sensitive to cellulase but not to proteinase K or DNase I. A gene cluster containing seven genes involved in bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, bcsD, bcsR, bcsQ, bcsA, bcsB, bcsZ, and bcsC, homologous to known genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis in other bacteria, was identified in B. glumae. Mutations in each gene abolished pellicle formation. These results revealed a positive correlation between cellulase-sensitive pellicles and putative cellulose biosynthetic genes. Pellicle-defective mutants did not colonize as successfully as the wild-type strain BGR1 in rice plants, which resulted in a significant reduction in virulence. Our findings show that cellulase-sensitive pellicles produced in a QS-independent manner play important roles in the interactions between rice plants and B. glumae.

  • occurrence of Burkholderia glumae on rice and field crops in korea
    Plant Pathology Journal, 2010
    Co-Authors: Yong Sung Kang, Ok Hee Choi, Ingyu Hwang

    Abstract:

    Burkholderia glumae causes bacterial rice grain rot and bacterial wilt on many field crops. We developed a simple diagnostic streak method for the isolation of B. glumae from diseased plant material. The geographical distribution of 178 Korean isolates shows that B. glumae is widely spread in South Korea.