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Burner Inlet

The Experts below are selected from a list of 159 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Christoph Appel – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Low NOx Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60Hz) and GT26 (50Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved SEV Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 upgrade 2011 and GT26 upgrade 2011 sequential reheat combustion system.Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the GT24 SEV combustor is around 1000 degC and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology.The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized towards rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regards to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. In addition, the Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in the Alstom high pressure sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation.This paper presents the obtained high pressure sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOX and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The high pressure tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOX formation and a more than 70K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware.For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOX emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature) and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18%-vol. C2+ and up to 5%-vol. hydrogen as standard).Copyright © 2015 by Alstom Technologie AG

  • Low NOx SEV Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Volume 4B: Combustion Fuels and Emissions, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60Hz) and GT26 (50Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved SEV Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 upgrade 2011 and GT26 upgrade 2011 sequential reheat combustion system.
    Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the GT24 SEV combustor is around 1000 degC and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology.
    The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized towards rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regards to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. In addition, the Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in the Alstom high pressure sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation.
    This paper presents the obtained high pressure sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOX and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The high pressure tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOX formation and a more than 70K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware.
    For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOX emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature) and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18%-vol. C2+ and up to 5%-vol. hydrogen as standard).

  • Low NO x Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Gabrielle Tea, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60 Hz) and GT26 (50 Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved sequential environmental (SEV) Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 and GT26 upgrades 2011 sequential reheat combustion system. Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24/GT26 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the SEV combustor is around 1000 °C and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology. The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized toward rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regard to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. The Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations, thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in Alstom’s high pressure (HP) sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation. This paper presents the obtained HP sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOx and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The HP tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOx formation and a more than 70 K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware. For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance, all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOx emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100 K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature), and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18 vol. % C2+ and up to 5 vol. % hydrogen as standard).

Thierry Schuller – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • damping combustion instabilities with perforates at the premixer Inlet of a swirled Burner
    Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, 2009
    Co-Authors: Nicolas Tran, Sebastien Ducruix, Thierry Schuller

    Abstract:

    Abstract Despite extensive efforts, controlling combustion instabilities in modern gas turbines remains a challenge at the design stage. The strong coupling between unsteady combustion and acoustics that leads to the growth of such instabilities is not yet fully mastered even though acoustics in complex geometries and combustion dynamics of turbulent swirled flames are now reasonably well understood. Comparatively, the effects of the acoustic boundary conditions on the system stability are much less studied. They are nonetheless of prime importance when a global acoustic energy balance is to be written in a combustor, as they determine the acoustic fluxes at the Inlets and outlets of the combustor. The present study describes a reliable solution to efficiently control the acoustic properties of a boundary condition upstream of the combustion zone, like the premixer manifold or the Inlet of a combustor. Effects of the acoustic reflection coefficient on self-sustained combustion oscillations are investigated and a passive control solution is proposed, using perforated plates with bias flow. Performances of this system are characterized on an existing turbulent swirl-stabilized combustion facility which exhibits strong unstable regimes. Tuning the upstream reflection coefficient leads to strong damping of the main resonant modes of the combustion instabilities, while modifications of the initial geometry and flow operating conditions are minimal. The combustion facility and the design of the control system are first described. Efficient control of the reflection coefficient is then assessed in an impedance tube, with large amplitudes of pressure fluctuations, typical of those encountered in practical systems. The influence of this control method on unstable regimes in the turbulent combustor facility is then presented. Finally the acoustic energy budget is examined and discussed at limit cycles for different values of the Burner Inlet reflection coefficient: ∣ R ∣ = 0.2 to 0.8.

Daniel Guyot – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Low NOx Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60Hz) and GT26 (50Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved SEV Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 upgrade 2011 and GT26 upgrade 2011 sequential reheat combustion system.Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the GT24 SEV combustor is around 1000 degC and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology.The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized towards rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regards to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. In addition, the Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in the Alstom high pressure sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation.This paper presents the obtained high pressure sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOX and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The high pressure tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOX formation and a more than 70K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware.For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOX emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature) and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18%-vol. C2+ and up to 5%-vol. hydrogen as standard).Copyright © 2015 by Alstom Technologie AG

  • Low NOx SEV Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Volume 4B: Combustion Fuels and Emissions, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60Hz) and GT26 (50Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved SEV Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 upgrade 2011 and GT26 upgrade 2011 sequential reheat combustion system.
    Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the GT24 SEV combustor is around 1000 degC and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology.
    The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized towards rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regards to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. In addition, the Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in the Alstom high pressure sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation.
    This paper presents the obtained high pressure sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOX and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The high pressure tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOX formation and a more than 70K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware.
    For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOX emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature) and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18%-vol. C2+ and up to 5%-vol. hydrogen as standard).

  • Low NO x Lean Premix Reheat Combustion in Alstom GT24 Gas Turbines
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2015
    Co-Authors: Daniel Guyot, Gabrielle Tea, Christoph Appel

    Abstract:

    Reducing gas turbine emissions and increasing their operational flexibility are key targets in today’s gas turbine market. In order to further reduce emissions and increase the operational flexibility of its GT24 (60 Hz) and GT26 (50 Hz), Alstom has introduced an improved sequential environmental (SEV) Burner and fuel lance into its GT24 and GT26 upgrades 2011 sequential reheat combustion system. Sequential combustion is a key differentiator of Alstom GT24/GT26 engines in the F-class gas turbine market. The Inlet temperature for the SEV combustor is around 1000 °C and reaction of the fuel/oxidant mixture is initiated through auto-ignition. The recent development of the Alstom sequential combustion system is a perfect example of evolutionary design optimizations and technology transfer between Alstom GT24 and GT26 engines. Better overall performance is achieved through improved SEV Burner aerodynamics and fuel injection, while keeping the main features of the sequential Burner technology. The improved SEV Burner/lance concept has been optimized toward rapid fuel/oxidant mixing for low emissions, improved fuel flexibility with regard to highly reactive fuels (higher C2+ and hydrogen content), and to sustain a wide operation window. The Burner front panel features an improved cooling concept based on near-wall cooling as well as integrated acoustics damping devices designed to reduce combustion pulsations, thus extending the SEV combustor’s operation window even further. After having been validated extensively in Alstom’s high pressure (HP) sector rig test facility, the improved GT24 SEV Burner has been retrofitted into a commercial GT24 field engine for full engine validation during long-term operation. This paper presents the obtained HP sector rig and engine validation results for the GT24 (2011) SEV Burner/lance hardware with a focus on reduced NOx and CO emissions and improved operational behavior of the SEV combustor. The HP tests demonstrated robust SEV Burner/lance operation with up to 50% lower NOx formation and a more than 70 K higher SEV Burner Inlet temperature compared to the GT24 (2006) hardware. For the GT24 engine with retrofitted upgrade 2011 SEV Burner/lance, all validation targets were achieved including an extremely robust operation behavior, up to 40% lower GT NOx emissions, significantly lower CO emissions at partload and baseload, a very broad operation window (up to 100 K width in SEV combustor Inlet temperature), and all measured SEV Burner/lance temperatures in the expected range. Sector rig and engine validation results have confirmed the expected SEV Burner fuel flexibility (up to 18 vol. % C2+ and up to 5 vol. % hydrogen as standard).