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Business Information Systems

The Experts below are selected from a list of 26205 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Maura Stephens – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • LibGuides: Business Information Systems (BIS): Home
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Maura Stephens

    Abstract:

    A guide of library Information for students on the Business Information Systems (BIS) degree. While most of the Information contained in this guide is aimed at GMIT students, It may be of use to anybody with an interest in the subject area

  • LibGuides: Business Information Systems (BIS): Theses
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Maura Stephens

    Abstract:

    A guide of library Information for students on the Business Information Systems (BIS) degree. While most of the Information contained in this guide is aimed at GMIT students, It may be of use to anybody with an interest in the subject area

  • LibGuides: Business Information Systems (BIS): Websites
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Maura Stephens

    Abstract:

    A guide of library Information for students on the Business Information Systems (BIS) degree. While most of the Information contained in this guide is aimed at GMIT students, It may be of use to anybody with an interest in the subject area

Odd Steen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Model Curriculum for a Bachelor of Science Program in Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2007)
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Sven Carlsson, Jonas Hedman, Odd Steen

    Abstract:

    Model Curriculum for a Bachelor of Science Programme in Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2007)

  • Model Curriculum for a Bachelor of Science Program in Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2010)
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Sven Carlsson, Jonas Hedman, Odd Steen

    Abstract:

    Commentators on Information Systems (IS) education have urged the IS community to develop new and alternative IS curricula. The IS 2002 model curriculum has recently been revised. The new IS 2010 curriculum guidelines for undergraduate degree programs in Information Systems [Topi et al. 2010] has a curriculum structure to accommodate the education of several different professional roles within IS. This paper identifies one such role, the Business Information Systems Designer. It presents and argues for a new, integrated Bachelor of Science curriculum for Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2010) to educate for this role. The proposed curriculum focuses on the design and use of IS in Business and has a strong design focus. The education focuses on developing and training a set of capabilities that enables the Business Information Systems Designer to participate in the design of Business and IS in concert. Some examples of capabilities are communication and presentation skills, Business and industry understanding, and high-level modeling. Consequently, the curriculum adopted a capabilities-driven pedagogical model in order to train specific skills. The paper presents the BISD 2010 with its specific expected learning outcomes, structure, and pedagogy, and also how the students should be able to fulfill the learning outcomes. The proposed curriculum differs from much of the current IS model curriculum discussions in a number of respects: (1) it is built on a notion of design, design science, and design as a profession, (2) it is based on a capability driven pedagogical model, (3) the curriculum is modeled for a European higher education context and the Bologna accord, and (4) it is not a model curriculum, but a specific, comprehensive, and ambitious curriculum for a degree program. (Less)

  • Integrated Curriculum for a Bachelor of Science in Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2010)
    Communications of The Ais, 2010
    Co-Authors: Sven Carlsson, Jonas Hedman, Odd Steen

    Abstract:

    Commentators on Information Systems (IS) education have urged the IS community to develop new and alternative IS curricula. The IS 2002 model curriculum has recently been revised. The new IS 2010 curriculum guidelines for undergraduate degree programs in Information Systems [Topi et al. 2010] has a curriculum structure to accommodate the education of several different professional roles within IS. This paper identifies one such role, the Business Information Systems Designer. It presents and argues for a new, integrated Bachelor of Science curriculum for Business Information Systems Design (BISD 2010) to educate for this role. The proposed curriculum focuses on the design and use of IS in Business and has a strong design focus. The education focuses on developing and training a set of capabilities that enables the Business Information Systems Designer to participate in the design of Business and IS in concert. Some examples of capabilities are communication and presentation skills, Business and industry understanding, and high-level modeling. Consequently, the curriculum adopted a capabilities-driven pedagogical model in order to train specific skills. The paper presents the BISD 2010 with its specific expected learning outcomes, structure, and pedagogy, and also how the students should be able to fulfill the learning outcomes. The proposed curriculum differs from much of the current IS model curriculum discussions in a number of respects: (1) it is built on a notion of design, design science, and design as a profession, (2) it is based on a capability driven pedagogical model, (3) the curriculum is modeled for a European higher education context and the Bologna accord, and (4) it is not a model curriculum, but a specific, comprehensive, and ambitious curriculum for a degree program.

Jessica Rubart – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • ICSC – Semantic Adaptation of Business Information Systems Using Human-Centered Business Rule Engines
    2016 IEEE Tenth International Conference on Semantic Computing (ICSC), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jessica Rubart

    Abstract:

    There is a strong need for customizing Business Information Systems, such as ERP or CRM solutions. This paper focuses on emerging decisions and on Business rules to support the decision making. The proposed Business rules can be edited by end users as well as system components. Both — the users and the system — shall be able to learn Business rules as well as integrate, and use them intelligently in the Business Information system. In order to address this concern, human-centered Business rule engines are proposed, which integrate data mining support and provide intelligent user interfaces to collaborating users. An underlying ontology is used to specify the vocabulary for the Business rules dependent on the Business Information system. We apply a mapping approach to map the concepts and relationships of the underlying ontology to user-oriented semantic types. Three usage scenarios give some examples of how the presented approach can be used.

  • Semantic Adaptation of Business Information Systems Using Human-Centered Business Rule Engines
    Proceedings – 2016 IEEE 10th International Conference on Semantic Computing, ICSC 2016, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jessica Rubart

    Abstract:

    There is a strong need for customizing Business Information Systems, such as ERP or CRM solutions. This paper focuses on emerging decisions and on Business rules to support the decision making. The proposed Business rules can be edited by end users as well as system components. Both – the users and the system – shall be able to learn Business rules as well as integrate, and use them intelligently in the Business Information system. In order to address this concern, human-centered Business rule engines are proposed, which integrate data mining support and provide intelligent user interfaces to collaborating users. An underlying ontology is used to specify the vocabulary for the Business rules dependent on the Business Information system. We apply a mapping approach to map the concepts and relationships of the underlying ontology to user-oriented semantic types. Three usage scenarios give some examples of how the presented approach can be used.