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Business Start-up

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3030 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Amanda Collins – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • developing entrepreneurship in west yorkshire west yorkshire universities partnership and Business start up leeds met
    Journal of Education and Training, 2003
    Co-Authors: Martyn Robertson, Amanda Collins

    Abstract:

    West Yorkshire universities together with Yorkshire Forward, the Regional Development Agency (RDA) for Yorkshire and Humberside, are collaborating on a graduate entrepreneurship programme. This paper outlines the national and regional context for the role of entrepreneurial education in producing new Business and a climate in which creativity and innovation may thrive.

Martyn Robertson – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • developing entrepreneurship in west yorkshire west yorkshire universities partnership and Business start up leeds met
    Journal of Education and Training, 2003
    Co-Authors: Martyn Robertson, Amanda Collins

    Abstract:

    West Yorkshire universities together with Yorkshire Forward, the Regional Development Agency (RDA) for Yorkshire and Humberside, are collaborating on a graduate entrepreneurship programme. This paper outlines the national and regional context for the role of entrepreneurial education in producing new Business and a climate in which creativity and innovation may thrive.

Mark N.k. Saunders – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Professionalization of the Business Start-up process
    Strategic Change, 2005
    Co-Authors: Richard Beresford, Mark N.k. Saunders

    Abstract:

    * The UK has no shortage of Business Start-ups: the Small Business Service estimated that at the start of 2003 there were 4.0 million active enterprises and of these, approximately 99% were classified as small (0–49 employees). The Bank of England (2004) estimate that during 2003 there were 465?000 Start-ups, an increase of 19% on 2002. Average survival rates for Businesses (1992–2001) indicate that more than half fail within three years of formation. Further, there is a general agreement that for micro Businesses the failure rate is higher, one-third failing within the first year. * Much of this failure has been blamed on a lack of Business and management skills amongst owner managers. These people often describe themselves by their technical discipline rather than as a Business person or manager, and tend to have an unwillingness to engage with training providers. It is suggested that this unwillingness is symptomatic of a culture of self-deception, which pervades the sector. This is despite 77% of owner managers believing their own Business management capabilities to be the most important factor for Business survival and growth. * Where Business and management training has been taken up, its impact has proven sub-optimal, with little evidence of benefit perceived by owner managers. To this extent providers could be viewed as complicit in the maintenance of a culture of fire fighting within micro firms. * This paper discusses an alternative training programme?—?Sustainability Support for Small Business (S3). This provides help to new Businesses over a four-month pre-Start-up period and the first three years of operations. The programme addresses participants’ short-term, immediate Business needs by focusing on key Business documents and facilitating reflection on the part of the owner manager, developing a more professional approach to Start-up. This programme was trialled throughout 2003 using a cohort of 147 micro Businesses. Subsequent evaluation revealed a one-year Business survival rate of 86%. The programme received a 95% approval rating from participants in their post-programme evaluation. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.