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Butylated Hydroxyanisole

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J. Whysner – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • safety assessment of Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene as antioxidant food additives
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Gary M. Williams, M. J. Iatropoulos, J. Whysner

    Abstract:

    Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are widely used antioxidant food additives. They have been extensively studied for potential toxicities. This review details experimental studies of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity which bear on cancer hazard assessment of exposure to humans. We conclude that BHA and BHT pose no cancer hazard and, to the contrary, may be anticarcinogenic at current levels of food additive use.

  • Safety assessment of Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene as antioxidant food additives
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 1999
    Co-Authors: G M Williams, M. J. Iatropoulos, J. Whysner

    Abstract:

    Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are widely used antioxidant food additives. They have been extensively studied for potential toxicities. This review details experimental studies of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity which bear on cancer hazard assessment of exposure to humans. We conclude that BHA and BHT pose no cancer hazard and, to the contrary, may be anticarcinogenic at current levels of food additive use. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Jing G Chung – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of Butylated Hydroxyanisole bha and Butylated hydroxytoluene bht on the acetylation of 2 aminofluorene and dna 2 aminofluorene adducts in the rat
    Toxicological Sciences, 1999
    Co-Authors: Jing G Chung

    Abstract:

    The effects of the synthetic phenolic antioxidants (Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene) on the in vivo acetylation of 2-aminofluorene and formation of DNA-2-aminofluorene adducts were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. For in vitro examination, cytosols and intact cells, with or without Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene co-treatment, showed different percentages of 2-aminofluorene acetylation and DNA-2-aminofluorene adducts. For in vivo examination, pretreatment of male rats with Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene (10 mg/kg) 48 h prior to the administration of 2-aminofluorene (50 mg/kg) resulted in 34% and 18%, 29% and 20% decreases, respectively, in the urinary and fecal recovery of N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene, and 34% and 19% decreases, respectively, in the metabolic clearance of 2-aminofluorene to N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene. Following exposure of rats to the 2-aminofluorene, with or without pretreatment with Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene, DNA-2-aminofluorene adducts were observed in the target tissues of liver and bladder, and also in circulating leukocytes. The DNA-2-aminofluorene adducts in liver, bladder, and leukocytes were decreased by pretreatment with Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene. This is the first demonstration that synthetic phenolic antioxidants decrease the N-acetylation of carcinogens and formation of DNA-carcinogen adducts in vivo.

Gary M. Williams – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • safety assessment of Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene as antioxidant food additives
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Gary M. Williams, M. J. Iatropoulos, J. Whysner

    Abstract:

    Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are widely used antioxidant food additives. They have been extensively studied for potential toxicities. This review details experimental studies of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity which bear on cancer hazard assessment of exposure to humans. We conclude that BHA and BHT pose no cancer hazard and, to the contrary, may be anticarcinogenic at current levels of food additive use.

  • Toxicity studies of Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene. I. Genetic and cellular effects.
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 1990
    Co-Authors: Gary M. Williams, C.a. Mcqueen, Charles Tong

    Abstract:

    The cellular effects of the antioxidants Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene were studied in a battery of in vitro tests. No evidence of genotoxicity was obtained for either compound in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test, the Salmonella/microsome mutagenesis test, the adult rat liver epithelial cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase test, or for Butylated Hydroxyanisole in the Chinese hamster ovary cell/sister chromatid exchange test. Both compounds inhibited intercellular molecular exchange between cultured liver cells, an effect that has been observed for many agents with neoplasm-promoting activity.

  • Toxicity studies of Butylated Hydroxyanisole and Butylated hydroxytoluene. II. Chronic feeding studies
    Food and Chemical Toxicology, 1990
    Co-Authors: Gary M. Williams, C.x. Wang, M.j. Iatropoulos

    Abstract:

    Abstract The antioxidants Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were fed in the diet to male F344 rats in two chronic feeding studies. In one study, feeding BHT for 76 wk at concentrations ranging from 100 to 6000 ppm produced no increase in neoplasms at any site. In a second study, feeding 12,000 ppm BHT for 110 wk had no neoplastic effect at any site, whereas feeding BHA at 12,000 ppm resulted in a small increase in squamous cell papillomas of the non-glandular squamous portion of the stomach.