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Bypass Control Valve

The Experts below are selected from a list of 24 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Hartmut Spliethoff – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Investigation of Different Operation Strategies to Provide Balance Energy With an Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plant Using Dynamic Simulation
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2016
    Co-Authors: S. Kahlert, Hartmut Spliethoff

    Abstract:

    Intermittency of renewable electricity generation poses a challenge to thermal power plants. While power plants in the public sector see a decrease in operating hours, the utilization of industrial power plants is mostly unaffected because process steam has to be provided. This study investigates to what extent the load of a combined heat and power (CHP) plant can be reduced while maintaining a reliable process steam supply. A dynamic process model of an industrial combined CHP plant is developed and validated with operational data. The model contains a gas turbine (GT), a single pressure heat recovery system generator (HRSG) with supplementary firing and an extraction condensing steam turbine. Technical limitations of the gas turbine, the supplementary firing, and the steam turbine constrain the load range of the plant. In consideration of these constraints, different operation strategies are performed at variable loads using dynamic simulation. A simulation study shows feasible load changes in 5 min for provision of secondary Control reserve (SCR). The load change capability of the combined cycle plant under consideration is mainly restricted by the water–steam cycle. It is shown that both the low pressure Control Valve (LPCV) of the extraction steam turbine and the high pressure Bypass Control Valve are suitable to ensure the process steam supply during the load change. The Controllability of the steam turbine load and the process stability are sufficient as long as the supplementary is not reaching the limits of the operating range.

  • Investigation of Different Operation Strategies to Provide Balance Energy With an Industrial CHP Plant Using Dynamic Simulation
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2016
    Co-Authors: S. Kahlert, Hartmut Spliethoff

    Abstract:

    Intermittency of renewable electricity generation poses a challenge to thermal power plants. While power plants in the public sector see a decrease in operating hours, the utilization of industrial power plants is mostly unaffected because process steam has to be provided. This study investigates to what extent the load of a CHP plant can be reduced while maintaining a reliable process steam supply. A dynamic process model of an industrial combined CHP plant is developed and validated with operational data. The model contains a gas turbine, a single pressure HRSG with supplementary firing and an extraction condensing steam turbine. Technical limitations of the gas turbine, the supplementary firing and the steam turbine constrain the load range of the plant. In consideration of these constraints, different operation strategies are performed at variable loads using dynamic simulation. A simulation study shows feasible load changes in 5 min for provision of secondary Control reserve. The load change capability of the combined cycle plant under consideration is mainly restricted by the water-steam cycle. It is shown that both the low pressure Control Valve of the extraction steam turbine and the high pressure Bypass Control Valve are suitable to ensure the process steam supply during the load change. The Controllability of the steam turbine load and the process stability are sufficient as long as the supplementary is not reaching the limits of the operating range.

S. Kahlert – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Investigation of Different Operation Strategies to Provide Balance Energy With an Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plant Using Dynamic Simulation
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2016
    Co-Authors: S. Kahlert, Hartmut Spliethoff

    Abstract:

    Intermittency of renewable electricity generation poses a challenge to thermal power plants. While power plants in the public sector see a decrease in operating hours, the utilization of industrial power plants is mostly unaffected because process steam has to be provided. This study investigates to what extent the load of a combined heat and power (CHP) plant can be reduced while maintaining a reliable process steam supply. A dynamic process model of an industrial combined CHP plant is developed and validated with operational data. The model contains a gas turbine (GT), a single pressure heat recovery system generator (HRSG) with supplementary firing and an extraction condensing steam turbine. Technical limitations of the gas turbine, the supplementary firing, and the steam turbine constrain the load range of the plant. In consideration of these constraints, different operation strategies are performed at variable loads using dynamic simulation. A simulation study shows feasible load changes in 5 min for provision of secondary Control reserve (SCR). The load change capability of the combined cycle plant under consideration is mainly restricted by the water–steam cycle. It is shown that both the low pressure Control Valve (LPCV) of the extraction steam turbine and the high pressure Bypass Control Valve are suitable to ensure the process steam supply during the load change. The Controllability of the steam turbine load and the process stability are sufficient as long as the supplementary is not reaching the limits of the operating range.

  • Investigation of Different Operation Strategies to Provide Balance Energy With an Industrial CHP Plant Using Dynamic Simulation
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2016
    Co-Authors: S. Kahlert, Hartmut Spliethoff

    Abstract:

    Intermittency of renewable electricity generation poses a challenge to thermal power plants. While power plants in the public sector see a decrease in operating hours, the utilization of industrial power plants is mostly unaffected because process steam has to be provided. This study investigates to what extent the load of a CHP plant can be reduced while maintaining a reliable process steam supply. A dynamic process model of an industrial combined CHP plant is developed and validated with operational data. The model contains a gas turbine, a single pressure HRSG with supplementary firing and an extraction condensing steam turbine. Technical limitations of the gas turbine, the supplementary firing and the steam turbine constrain the load range of the plant. In consideration of these constraints, different operation strategies are performed at variable loads using dynamic simulation. A simulation study shows feasible load changes in 5 min for provision of secondary Control reserve. The load change capability of the combined cycle plant under consideration is mainly restricted by the water-steam cycle. It is shown that both the low pressure Control Valve of the extraction steam turbine and the high pressure Bypass Control Valve are suitable to ensure the process steam supply during the load change. The Controllability of the steam turbine load and the process stability are sufficient as long as the supplementary is not reaching the limits of the operating range.

W.e. Bill Forsthoffer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Component design Control Valves and instrumentation
    Forsthoffer's Rotating Equipment Handbooks, 2020
    Co-Authors: W.e. Bill Forsthoffer

    Abstract:

    This chapter examines the function, sizing, and selection of auxiliary system components, namely Controls and instrumentation. The function of the Controls and instrumentation is to continuously supply fluid to each specified point at the required pressure, temperature, and flow rate. System Controls modify the operational characteristics of these components to achieve the desired results. All system Controls and instrumentation must function perfectly under both steady state and transient conditions. Under normal operation, a steady state Control mode is approached because flows, pressures, and temperatures change very slowly if at all. A Bypass Control Valve and actuator are used with a positive displacement pump to alter the pump’s flow characteristic to that of variable flow. If the Valve system experiences instabilities or excessive friction, as in the case of Valve stem binding, the system will experience an instantaneous loss of flow and will be shut down on this signal. The primary application for pressure reducing Valves in auxiliary systems is for reducing system pressure to other desired pressure levels.