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The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sirpa Vilska – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • five years of single embryo transfer with anonymous and non anonymous oocyte donation
    Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 2007
    Co-Authors: Viveca Soderstromanttila, Sirpa Vilska

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single embryo transfer (SET) has been the main embryo transfer strategy in the oocyte donation programme at the authors’ clinic since 2000. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SET on the clinical outcome in an unselected group of oocyte recipients. A retrospective analysis of the outcome in 142 recipient cycles (116 from anonymous donors; 26 from known donors) was performed. The oocytes from each anonymous donor were shared between two recipients if at least 10 oocytes were obtained. The proportion of SET of all fresh transfers was 77.3%. The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was 43.2% and the delivery rate 31.1% per embryo transfer. The outcome was similar in recipients undergoing anonymous and non-anonymous donation. The delivery rates were similar after SET (30.4%) or double embryo transfer (DET) (33.3%), whereas the twin rate was 0% after SET and 40% after DET. The implantation rate was significantly better ( P

Anna Veiga – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • elective single embryo transfer in oocyte donation programmes should it be the rule
    Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 2012
    Co-Authors: Elisabet Clua, Buenaventura Coroleu, Montse Boada, I Rodriguez, Pedro N Barri, Anna Veiga

    Abstract:

    Abstract The aim of this study is to compare the cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates (fresh embryo transfers followed by frozen–thawed embryo transfers from the same stimulated cycle) between single-embryo transfer (SET) and double-embryo transfer (DET) in an oocyte donation programme. A retrospective analysis of the outcome in 1139 recipient fresh cycles (1073 from DET and 66 from SET) with at least three available embryos for transfer was performed. The clinical pregnancy rates were similar after SET (45.5%, 30/66) and DET (57.1%, 613/1073), whereas the multiple pregnancy rate was 0% and 39.5% for SET and DET, respectively. After evaluating the results using the Kaplan–Meier survival analysis in a period of 1 year, no statistically significant differences were observed in the cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates (SET 82.8% and 76.4% versus DET 77.2% and 63.7%). The results indicate that for women who have at least three available embryos in oocyte donation programmes, one single embryo should be transferred as no significant decrease in the success rate is observed and multiple pregnancy can be avoided. Clinical pregnancy rate is higher when transferring two embryos compared with one. However, this also results in a higher incidence of twin pregnancy, which is associated with increased obstetric and perinatal risks. The aim of this study was to compare the cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates (fresh embryo transfers followed by frozen–thawed embryo transfers from the same stimulated cycle) between single-embryo transfer (SET) and double-embryo transfer (DET) cycles in our oocyte donation programme. A retrospective analysis of the outcome in 1139 recipient fresh cycles (1076 from DET and 66 from SET) with at least three available embryos for transfer was performed. The clinical pregnancy rates were similar after SET (45.5%, 30/66) and DET (57.1%, 613/1073), whereas the multiple pregnancy rate was 0% and 39.5% for SET and DET, respectively. The cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were similar between the two strategies (SET 82.8% versus DET 77.2%) and the same was found for the cumulative live birth rates (SET 76.4% versus DET 63.7%). Our results indicate that for women who have at least three available embryos in OD programmes, one single embryo should be transferred as no significant decrease in the success rate is observed while multiple pregnancy is avoided.

Viveca Soderstromanttila – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • five years of single embryo transfer with anonymous and non anonymous oocyte donation
    Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 2007
    Co-Authors: Viveca Soderstromanttila, Sirpa Vilska

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single embryo transfer (SET) has been the main embryo transfer strategy in the oocyte donation programme at the authors’ clinic since 2000. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SET on the clinical outcome in an unselected group of oocyte recipients. A retrospective analysis of the outcome in 142 recipient cycles (116 from anonymous donors; 26 from known donors) was performed. The oocytes from each anonymous donor were shared between two recipients if at least 10 oocytes were obtained. The proportion of SET of all fresh transfers was 77.3%. The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was 43.2% and the delivery rate 31.1% per embryo transfer. The outcome was similar in recipients undergoing anonymous and non-anonymous donation. The delivery rates were similar after SET (30.4%) or double embryo transfer (DET) (33.3%), whereas the twin rate was 0% after SET and 40% after DET. The implantation rate was significantly better ( P