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Calcium Phosphate Cement

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John A. Jansen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Stabilizing dental implants with a fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cement: an in vitro and in vivo study.
    Acta Biomaterialia, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sónia De Lacerda Schickert, John A. Jansen, Ewald M. Bronkhorst, Jeroen J.j.p. Van Den Beucken, Sander C. G. Leeuwenburgh

    Abstract:

    Abstract Stabilization of dental implants by means of biomaterials such as bioceramic granules and Cements is currently compromised by the poor mechanical properties of these bioceramics. Recently, our group developed a Calcium Phosphate Cement reinforced with poly(vinyl alcohol) fibers with improved flexural strength and toughness. Herein we evaluated the capacity of these fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cements to stabilize dental implants in vitro and in vivo using a range of mechanical and biological test methods. In vitro, filling of circumferential crestal peri-implant bone defects with synthetic bone analogues with fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cement demonstrated superior implant stability as compared to fiber-free Calcium Phosphate Cement over a 12-week period. Similarly, filling of circumferential crestal peri-implant bone defects with fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cement effectively stabilized dental implants installed in a rabbit femoral condyle defect as assessed via both implant stability quotient (ISQ) and torque-out measurements. Moreover, histological and histomorphometric evaluation demonstrated the osteocompatibility of fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cement, as evidenced by absence of soft tissue ingrowth, direct contact between the bone and Cement, and gradual degradation of the biomaterial and replaCement by newly-formed bone. These data demonstrate that fiber-reinforced Calcium Phosphate Cement stabilize dental implants during osseointegration.

  • introduction of gelatin microspheres into an injectable Calcium Phosphate Cement
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2008
    Co-Authors: Wouter J E M Habraken, Antonios G. Mikos, L T De Jonge, J G C Wolke, Li Yubao, John A. Jansen

    Abstract:

    For tissue engineered bone constructs, Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC) has a high potential as scaffold material because of its biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, in vivo resorption and tissue ingrowth is slow. To address these issues, microspheres can be incorporated into the Cement, which will create macroporosity after in situ degradation. The goal of this study was to investigate the handling properties and degradation characteristics of CPC containing gelatin microspheres. Setting time and injectability were determined and an in vitro degradation study was performed. Samples were assayed on mass, compression strength, E-modulus, and morphology. A supplementary degradation test with gelatin microspheres was performed to investigate the influence of physical conditions inside the Cement on microsphere stability. The gelatin microsphere CPCs were easy to inject and showed initial setting times of less than 3 min. After 12-weeks in vitro degradation no increase in macroporosity was observed, which was supported by the small mass loss and stabilizing mechanical strength. Even a clear densification of the composite was observed. Explanations for the lack of macroporosity were recrystallization of the Cement onto or inside the gelatin spheres and a delayed degradation of gelatin microspheres inside the scaffold. The supplementary degradation test showed that the pH is a factor in the delayed gelatin microsphere degradation. Also differences in degradation rate between types of gelatin were observed. Overall, the introduction of gelatin microspheres into CPC renders composites with good handling properties, though the degradation characteristics should be further investigated to generate a macroporous scaffold.

  • rhbmp 2 release from injectable poly dl lactic co glycolic acid Calcium Phosphate Cement composites
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2003
    Co-Authors: Quinten P Ruhe, Elizabeth L Hedberg, Nestor Torio Padron, Paul H. M. Spauwen, John A. Jansen, Antonios G. Mikos

    Abstract:

    Background: In bone tissue engineering, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are frequently used as a delivery vehicle for bioactive molecules. Calcium Phosphate Cement is an injectable, osteoconductive,and degradable bone Cement that sets in situ. The objective of this study was to create an injectable composite based on Calcium Phosphate Cement embedded with PLGA microparticles for sustained delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Methods: 1 2 5 I-labeled rhBMP-2 was incorporated in PLGA microparticles. PLGA microparticle/CalciumPhosphate Cement composites were prepared in a ratio of 30:70 by weight. Material properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, microcomputed tomography, and mechanical testing. Release kinetics of rhBMP-2 from PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks and PLGA microparticles alone were determined in vitro in two buffer solutions (pH 7.4 and pH 4.0) for up to twenty-eight days. Results: The entrapment yield of rhBMP-2 in PLGA microparticles was a mean (and standard deviation) of 79% ′ 8%. Analysis showed spherical PLGA microparticles (average size, 17.2 ′1.3 μm) distributed homogeneously throughout the nanoporous disks. The average compressive strength was significantly lower (p < 0.001) for PLGA and CalciumPhosphate Cement composite scaffolds than for CalciumPhosphate Cement scaffolds alone (6.4 ′ 0.6 MPa compared with 38.6 ′ 2.6 MPa, respectively). Average rhBMP-2 loading was 5.0 ′ 0.4 μg per 75-mm 3 disk. Release of rhBMP-2 was limited for all formulations. At pH 7.4, 3.1% ′ 0.1% of the rhBMP-2 was released from the PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks and 18.0% ′ 1.9% was released from the PLGA microparticles alone after twenty-eight days. At pH 4.0, PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks revealed more release of rhBMP-2 than did PLGA microparticles alone (14.5% ′ 6.3% compared with 5.4% ′ 0.7%) by day 28. Conclusions: These results indicate that preparation of a PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement composite for the delivery of rhBMP-2 is feasible and that the release of rhBMP-2 is dependent on the composite composition and nanostructure as well as the pH of the release medium. Clinical Relevance: An osteoconductive and osteoinductive rhBMP-2-loaded PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement composite may potentially result in an injectable bone-graft substitute for the regeneration of bone in ectopic or orthotopic sites.

Antonios G. Mikos – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • introduction of gelatin microspheres into an injectable Calcium Phosphate Cement
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 2008
    Co-Authors: Wouter J E M Habraken, Antonios G. Mikos, L T De Jonge, J G C Wolke, Li Yubao, John A. Jansen

    Abstract:

    For tissue engineered bone constructs, Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC) has a high potential as scaffold material because of its biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, in vivo resorption and tissue ingrowth is slow. To address these issues, microspheres can be incorporated into the Cement, which will create macroporosity after in situ degradation. The goal of this study was to investigate the handling properties and degradation characteristics of CPC containing gelatin microspheres. Setting time and injectability were determined and an in vitro degradation study was performed. Samples were assayed on mass, compression strength, E-modulus, and morphology. A supplementary degradation test with gelatin microspheres was performed to investigate the influence of physical conditions inside the Cement on microsphere stability. The gelatin microsphere CPCs were easy to inject and showed initial setting times of less than 3 min. After 12-weeks in vitro degradation no increase in macroporosity was observed, which was supported by the small mass loss and stabilizing mechanical strength. Even a clear densification of the composite was observed. Explanations for the lack of macroporosity were recrystallization of the Cement onto or inside the gelatin spheres and a delayed degradation of gelatin microspheres inside the scaffold. The supplementary degradation test showed that the pH is a factor in the delayed gelatin microsphere degradation. Also differences in degradation rate between types of gelatin were observed. Overall, the introduction of gelatin microspheres into CPC renders composites with good handling properties, though the degradation characteristics should be further investigated to generate a macroporous scaffold.

  • rhbmp 2 release from injectable poly dl lactic co glycolic acid Calcium Phosphate Cement composites
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American Volume, 2003
    Co-Authors: Quinten P Ruhe, Elizabeth L Hedberg, Nestor Torio Padron, Paul H. M. Spauwen, John A. Jansen, Antonios G. Mikos

    Abstract:

    Background: In bone tissue engineering, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are frequently used as a delivery vehicle for bioactive molecules. Calcium Phosphate Cement is an injectable, osteoconductive,and degradable bone Cement that sets in situ. The objective of this study was to create an injectable composite based on Calcium Phosphate Cement embedded with PLGA microparticles for sustained delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Methods: 1 2 5 I-labeled rhBMP-2 was incorporated in PLGA microparticles. PLGA microparticle/CalciumPhosphate Cement composites were prepared in a ratio of 30:70 by weight. Material properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, microcomputed tomography, and mechanical testing. Release kinetics of rhBMP-2 from PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks and PLGA microparticles alone were determined in vitro in two buffer solutions (pH 7.4 and pH 4.0) for up to twenty-eight days. Results: The entrapment yield of rhBMP-2 in PLGA microparticles was a mean (and standard deviation) of 79% ′ 8%. Analysis showed spherical PLGA microparticles (average size, 17.2 ′1.3 μm) distributed homogeneously throughout the nanoporous disks. The average compressive strength was significantly lower (p < 0.001) for PLGA and CalciumPhosphate Cement composite scaffolds than for CalciumPhosphate Cement scaffolds alone (6.4 ′ 0.6 MPa compared with 38.6 ′ 2.6 MPa, respectively). Average rhBMP-2 loading was 5.0 ′ 0.4 μg per 75-mm 3 disk. Release of rhBMP-2 was limited for all formulations. At pH 7.4, 3.1% ′ 0.1% of the rhBMP-2 was released from the PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks and 18.0% ′ 1.9% was released from the PLGA microparticles alone after twenty-eight days. At pH 4.0, PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement disks revealed more release of rhBMP-2 than did PLGA microparticles alone (14.5% ′ 6.3% compared with 5.4% ′ 0.7%) by day 28. Conclusions: These results indicate that preparation of a PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement composite for the delivery of rhBMP-2 is feasible and that the release of rhBMP-2 is dependent on the composite composition and nanostructure as well as the pH of the release medium. Clinical Relevance: An osteoconductive and osteoinductive rhBMP-2-loaded PLGA/CalciumPhosphate Cement composite may potentially result in an injectable bone-graft substitute for the regeneration of bone in ectopic or orthotopic sites.

  • rhBMP-2 release from injectable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CalciumPhosphate Cement composites.
    The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, 2003
    Co-Authors: P Quinten Ruhe, Elizabeth L Hedberg, Nestor Torio Padron, Paul H. M. Spauwen, John A. Jansen, Antonios G. Mikos

    Abstract:

    In bone tissue engineering, poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are frequently used as a delivery vehicle for bioactive molecules. Calcium Phosphate Cement is an injectable, osteoconductive, and degradable bone Cement that sets in situ. The objective of this study was to create an injectable composite based on Calcium Phosphate Cement embedded with PLGA microparticles for sustained delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2).

Maria-pau Ginebra – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • porous hydroxyapatite and gelatin hydroxyapatite microspheres obtained by Calcium Phosphate Cement emulsion
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B, 2011
    Co-Authors: Roman A. Perez, Maria-pau Ginebra, George Altankov, Sergio Del Valle

    Abstract:

    Hydroxyapatite and hybrid gelatine/hydroxyapatite microspheres were obtained through a water in oil emulsion of a Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC). The setting reaction of the CPC, in this case the hydrolysis of α-triCalcium Phosphate, was responsible for the consolidation of the microspheres. After the setting reaction, the microspheres consisted of an entangled network of hydroxyapatite crystals, with a high porosity and pore sizes ranging between 0.5 and 5 μm. The size of the microspheres was tailored by controlling the viscosity of the hydrophobic phase, the rotation speed, and the initial powder size of the CPC. The incorporation of gelatin increased the sphericity of the microspheres, as well as their size and size dispersion. To assess the feasibility of using the microspheres as cell microcarriers, Saos-2 cells were cultured on the microspheres. Fluorescent staining, SEM studies, and LDH quantification showed that the microspheres were able to sustain cell growth. Cell adhesion and proliferation was significantly improved in the hybrid gelatin/hydroxyapatite microspheres as compared to the hydroxyapatite ones. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2011.

  • Porous hydroxyapatite and gelatin/hydroxyapatite microspheres obtained by Calcium Phosphate Cement emulsion
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research – Part B Applied Biomaterials, 2011
    Co-Authors: Roman A. Perez, Sergio Del Valle, George Altankov, Maria-pau Ginebra

    Abstract:

    Hydroxyapatite and hybrid gelatine/hydroxyapatite microspheres were obtained through a water in oil emulsion of a Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC). The setting reaction of the CPC, in this case the hydrolysis of α-triCalcium Phosphate, was responsible for the consolidation of the microspheres. After the setting reaction, the microspheres consisted of an entangled network of hydroxyapatite crystals, with a high porosity and pore sizes ranging between 0.5 and 5 μm. The size of the microspheres was tailored by controlling the viscosity of the hydrophobic phase, the rotation speed, and the initial powder size of the CPC. The incorporation of gelatin increased the sphericity of the microspheres, as well as their size and size dispersion. To assess the feasibility of using the microspheres as cell microcarriers, Saos-2 cells were cultured on the microspheres. Fluorescent staining, SEM studies, and LDH quantification showed that the microspheres were able to sustain cell growth. Cell adhesion and proliferation was significantly improved in the hybrid gelatin/hydroxyapatite microspheres as compared to the hydroxyapatite ones.