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Thomas N. Seyfried – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • N -butyldeoxynojirimycin reduces growth and ganglioside content of Experimental Mouse brain tumours
    British Journal of Cancer, 2001
    Co-Authors: Michaela K. Ranes, Mohga El-abbadi, M G Manfredi, Purna Mukherjee, Frances M. Platt, Thomas N. Seyfried
    Abstract:

    N -butyldeoxynojirimycin reduces growth and ganglioside content of Experimental Mouse brain tumours

  • Gangliosides influence angiogenesis in an Experimental Mouse brain tumor.
    Cancer Research, 1999
    Co-Authors: Mark Manfredi, Kevin P. Claffey, Thomas N. Seyfried
    Abstract:

    Gangliosides are sialated glycosphingolipids present on the plasma membranes of all vertebrate cells. Tumors shed gangliosides into the extracellular microenvironment, which may influence tumor-host cell interactions. We have investigated the role of gangliosides on the growth and angiogenesis of the EPEN Experimental Mouse brain tumor. EPEN cells express only ganglioside GM3, and the solid tumors formed in vivo are sparsely vascularized with extensive necrosis. We stably transfected the EPEN cells with the cDNA for N -acetylgalactosaminyl transferase, a key enzyme for the synthesis of complex gangliosides. In addition to GM3, the transfected cell line (EPEN-GNT) expressed complex gangliosides GM2, GM1, and GD1a. The EPEN-GNT tumor was more densely vascularized with less necrosis and grew more rapidly than the nontransfected EPEN or mock-transfected (EPEN-V) control tumors. Also, VEGF gene expression was higher in the EPEN-GNT tumor than in the control tumors. The synthesis of complex gangliosides in the EPEN-GNT tumor cells also stimulated vascularization in an in vivo Matrigel assay for angiogenesis. These results indicate that the ratio of GM3 to complex gangliosides can influence the growth and angiogenic properties of the EPEN Experimental brain tumor and are consistent with previous findings in other systems. We conclude that gangliosides may be important modulators of brain tumotumor angiogenesis.

  • Ganglioside biosynthetic gene expression in Experimental Mouse brain tumors.
    Cancer Research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey A. Ecsedy, Mark Manfredi, Herbert C. Yohe, Thomas N. Seyfried
    Abstract:

    Abstract The genes for cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (NeuAc-H) and β-1,4-N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase (GalNAc-T)were examined using reverse transcription-PCR in two Experimental Mouse brain tumors, EPEN and CT-2A. NeuAc-H is required for the synthesis of gangliosides containing N-glycolylneuraminic acid, whereas GalNAc-T is required for the synthesis of ganglioside GM2. The genes were analyzed in solid tumors grown in vivo and in tumor cells grown in vitro. NeuGc-containing gangliosides are abundant in cells of the Mouse immune system, including macrophages, but are undetectable in normal Mouse brain. GM2 is expressed in both neural and nonneural Mouse cells and tissues. The EPEN tumor cells synthesize only ganglioside GM3, whereas the CT-2A tumor cells synthesize GM3, GM2, GM1, and GD1a. NeuAc-H gene expression was detected in both solid tumors grown in vivo but was undetectable in either tumor cell line. The presence or absence of NeuAc-H gene expression in the tumor tissues and cells correlates with the presence or absence, respectively, of NeuGc-containing gangliosides. Differences in GalNAc-T gene expression between the solid tumors and the cultured tumor cells correlate with the expression of ganglioside GM2. The findings suggest that the differences in ganglioside biosynthetic gene expression between brain tumors grown in vivo and in vitro are associated with the presence or absence, respectively, of tumor-infiltrating host cells.

Angeles Fernandez-arche – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia
    Inflammopharmacology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sergio Montserrat-de La Paz, Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez, Ana Maria Quilez, Rocio Puerta, Angeles Fernandez-arche
    Abstract:

    Background The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress. Aims This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Methods Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups ( n  = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Results and conclusions GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal alloallodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE_2, TXB_2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an Experimental FMS model.

  • Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia
    Inflammopharmacology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez, Ana Maria Quilez, Rocio Puerta, Angeles Fernandez-arche
    Abstract:

    The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress. This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups (n = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal alloallodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE2, TXB2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an Experimental FMS model.

Sergio Montserrat-de La Paz – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia
    Inflammopharmacology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sergio Montserrat-de La Paz, Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez, Ana Maria Quilez, Rocio Puerta, Angeles Fernandez-arche
    Abstract:

    Background The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress. Aims This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Methods Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups ( n  = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Results and conclusions GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE_2, TXB_2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an Experimental FMS model.

Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia
    Inflammopharmacology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sergio Montserrat-de La Paz, Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez, Ana Maria Quilez, Rocio Puerta, Angeles Fernandez-arche
    Abstract:

    Background The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress. Aims This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Methods Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups ( n  = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Results and conclusions GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE_2, TXB_2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an Experimental FMS model.

  • Ginger rhizome enhances the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of paracetamol in an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia
    Inflammopharmacology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Maria Dolores Garcia-gimenez, Ana Maria Quilez, Rocio Puerta, Angeles Fernandez-arche
    Abstract:

    The dried rhizome of ginger has been widely used for more than 2500 years in folk medicine for the treatment of various diseases that involve inflammation or are caused by oxidative stress. This study was designed to compare the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of dried powdered ginger rhizome (GR) and paracetamol (APAP) on an Experimental Mouse model of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). Forty-eight female C57BL/6 J mice were used for the experiments. The animals were allocated in six groups (n = 8). Each group received one of the following treatments for 8 weeks: healthy control, ICS group, ICS + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day), ICS + GR (0.5%); ICS + GR (1%), and ICS + GR (0.5%) + APAP (40 mg/Kg/day). After treatment, symptoms of FMS were induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS). GR consumption improved mechanical and thermal allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and improved behavioural changes related to cognitive disturbances, anxiety, and depression. In addition, GR also significantly decreased the inflammatory response of proinflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE2, TXB2, and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated macrophages. The effects of APAP were significantly enhanced by co-administration with GR. These findings provide evidence that the daily consumption of GR enhances the anti-nociceptive effect of APAP in mice, improves other cognitive disturbances associated with chronic pain, and reduces the inflammatory state generated in an Experimental FMS model.

Stephan Ensminger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of vessels affected by transplant arteriosclerosis in an Experimental Mouse aortic allograft model.
    The Thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, 2011
    Co-Authors: J. Gebhardt, L. Budinsky, Udo Reulbach, Michael Weyand, Andreas Hess, Stephan Ensminger
    Abstract:

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is still the leading cause of late mortality after heart trantransplantation despite advances in immunosuppression regimes. Experimental Mouse models have substantially contributed to a better understanding of the multifactorial pathogenesis, but the major limitation of these studies is the difficulty in monitoring progression of transplant arteriosclerosis over time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether MR measurements are sensitive enough to detect characteristic vascular lesions in a small animal transplantation model. For this purpose we investigated 22 iso- and allogeneic aortic graft transplanted mice in vivo with a 4.7 T MR scanner using a 2D-RARE technique, 3D time-of-flight angiography and 3D phase contrast angiography as well as a special snake-based reconstruction algorithm. The MR lumen values of patency from native images and from 3D vessel reconstructions of the respective methods were correlated with conventional histological analysis. A comparison of the different techniques showed that angiographic MR modalities correlated well with histological measurements. 2D-RARE sequences were inferior to the sequences obtained by other ones. Superior correlations and the most accurate results were found for vessel reconstruction based on 3D angiographic time-of-flight data. These data demonstrate that Mouse in vivo MR imaging is sensitive enough to detect and quantify vascular changes caused by transplant arteriosclerosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  • Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of vessels affected by transplant arteriosclerosis in an Experimental Mouse aortic allograft model.
    Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon, 2011
    Co-Authors: J. Gebhardt, L. Budinsky, Udo Reulbach, Michael Weyand, Andreas Hess, Stephan Ensminger
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Transplant arteriosclerosis is still the leading cause of late mortality after heart trantransplantation despite advances in immunosuppression regimes. Experimental Mouse models have substantially contributed to a better understanding of the multifactorial pathogenesis, but the major limitation of these studies is the difficulty in monitoring progression of transplant arteriosclerosis over time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether MR measurements are sensitive enough to detect characteristic vascular lesions in a small animal transplantation model. METHODS: For this purpose we investigated 22 iso- and allogeneic aortic graft transplanted mice in vivo with a 4.7 T MR scanner using a 2D-RARE technique, 3D time-of-flight angiography and 3D phase contrast angiography as well as a special snake-based reconstruction algorithm. The MR lumen values of patency from native images and from 3D vessel reconstructions of the respective methods were correlated with conventional histological analysis. RESULTS: A comparison of the different techniques showed that angiographic MR modalities correlated well with histological measurements. 2D-RARE sequences were inferior to the sequences obtained by other ones. Superior correlations and the most accurate results were found for vessel reconstruction based on 3D angiographic time-of-flight data. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that Mouse in vivo MR imaging is sensitive enough to detect and quantify vascular changes caused by transplant arteriosclerosis.