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Ivan Cheng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Preoperative epidural steroid injections are not associated with increased rates of infection and dural tear in Lumbar spine surgery
    European Spine Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jayme C. B. Koltsov, Matthew W. Smuck, Todd F. Alamin, Kirkham B. Wood, Ivan Cheng
    Abstract:

    Purpose The study objectives were to use a large national claims data resource to examine rates of preoperative epidural steroid injections (ESI) in Lumbar spine surgery and determine whether preoperative ESI or the timing of preoperative ESI is associated with rates of postoperative complications and reoperations. Methods A retrospective longitudinal analysis of patients undergoing Lumbar spine surgery for disc herniation and/or spinal stenstenosis was undertaken using the MarketScan® databases from 2007–2015. Propensity-score matched cohorts were constructed to compare rates of complications and reoperations in patients with and without preoperative ESI. Results Within the year prior to surgery, 120,898 (46.4%) patients had a lumber ESI. The median time between ESI and surgery was 10 weeks. 23.1% of patients having preoperative ESI had more than one level injected, and 66.5% had more than one preoperative ESI treatment. Patients with chronic pain were considerably more likely to have an ESI prior to their surgery [OR 1.62 (1.54, 1.69), p  

  • Preoperative epidural steroid injections are not associated with increased rates of infection and dural tear in Lumbar spine surgery
    European Spine Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jayme C. B. Koltsov, Ivan Cheng, Matthew W. Smuck, Todd F. Alamin, Kirkham B. Wood, Serena S. Hu
    Abstract:

    Purpose The study objectives were to use a large national claims data resource to examine rates of preoperative epidural steroid injections (ESI) in Lumbar spine surgery and determine whether preoperative ESI or the timing of preoperative ESI is associated with rates of postoperative complications and reoperations. Methods A retrospective longitudinal analysis of patients undergoing Lumbar spine surgery for disc herniation and/or spinal stenstenosis was undertaken using the MarketScan® databases from 2007–2015. Propensity-score matched cohorts were constructed to compare rates of complications and reoperations in patients with and without preoperative ESI. Results Within the year prior to surgery, 120,898 (46.4%) patients had a lumber ESI. The median time between ESI and surgery was 10 weeks. 23.1% of patients having preoperative ESI had more than one level injected, and 66.5% had more than one preoperative ESI treatment. Patients with chronic pain were considerably more likely to have an ESI prior to their surgery [OR 1.62 (1.54, 1.69), p  

J Hutchinson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • THE ROLE OF Lumbar SPINE SUBTYPE AND PELVIC INCIDENCE IN THE AETIOLOGY OF DEGENERATIVE SCOLIOSIS
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Peter Alexander Torrie, R. Purcell, S. Morris, Ian Harding, P. Dolan, M. Adams, I. Nelson, J Hutchinson
    Abstract:

    Aim:To determine if patients with coronal plane deformity in the Lumbar spine have a higher grade of Lumbar spine subtype compared to controls.Method:This was a retrospective case/control study based on a review of radiological investigations in 250 patients aged over 40 years who had standing plain film Lumbar radiographs with hips present. Measurements of Lumbar coronal planplane angle, Lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and pelvic incidence were obtained. “Cases” with degenerative scoliosis (n=125) were defined as patients with a Lumbar coronal planplane angle of >10°.Lumbar spine subtype was categorised (1–4) using the Roussouly classification. Lumbar spine subtype was dichotomised into low (type 1,2) or high (type 3,4). Prevalence of Lumbar spine subtype in cases versus controls was compared using the Chi squared test. Pelvic incidence was compared using an unpaired T-test. Predictors of Lumbar coronal planplane angle were identified using stepwise multiple regression. Significance was accepted at P

  • THE ROLE OF Lumbar SPINE SUBTYPE AND PELVIC INCIDENCE IN THE AETIOLOGY OF DEGENERATIVE SCOLIOSIS
    Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-british Volume, 2014
    Co-Authors: Peter Alexander Torrie, R. Purcell, S. Morris, Ian Harding, P. Dolan, M. Adams, I. Nelson, J Hutchinson
    Abstract:

    Aim: To determine if patients with coronal plane deformity in the Lumbar spine have a higher grade of Lumbar spine subtype compared to controls. Method: This was a retrospective case/control study based on a review of radiological investigations in 250 patients aged over 40 years who had standing plain film Lumbar radiographs with hips present. Measurements of Lumbar coronal planplane angle, Lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, pelvic tilt and pelvic incidence were obtained. “Cases” with degenerative scoliosis (n=125) were defined as patients with a Lumbar coronal planplane angle of >10°. Lumbar spine subtype was categorised (1–4) using the Roussouly classification. Lumbar spine subtype was dichotomised into low (type 1,2) or high (type 3,4). Prevalence of Lumbar spine subtype in cases versus controls was compared using the Chi squared test. Pelvic incidence was compared using an unpaired T-test. Predictors of Lumbar coronal planplane angle were identified using stepwise multiple regression. Significance was accepted at P Results: The prevalence of type 1–4 Lumbar spine subtypes in the case group were 12.8%, 20.8%, 30.4% and 36% respectively and in the control group were 10.4%, 38.3% and 28% and 23.3% respectively. Types 3 and 4 Lumbar spine subtypes were more prevalent in the cases group (66.4% vs 51.2% respectively, P=0.0207). Pelvic incidence was not significant different between groups (P=0.0594). No significant predictors of Lumbar coronal planplane angle were determined. Lumbar spine subtype (P=0.969), pelvic incidence (P=0.740), sacral slope (P=0.203) pelvic tilt (P=0.167) and Lumbar lordosis (P=0.088) were not significant. Discussion: Results show that neither the Lumbar spine subtype nor pelvic parameters appear to have a significant influence on determining the coronal planplane angle in the degenerative Lumbar spine. Conflict Of Interest Statement: No conflict of interest.

Jayme C. B. Koltsov – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Preoperative epidural steroid injections are not associated with increased rates of infection and dural tear in Lumbar spine surgery
    European Spine Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jayme C. B. Koltsov, Matthew W. Smuck, Todd F. Alamin, Kirkham B. Wood, Ivan Cheng
    Abstract:

    Purpose The study objectives were to use a large national claims data resource to examine rates of preoperative epidural steroid injections (ESI) in Lumbar spine surgery and determine whether preoperative ESI or the timing of preoperative ESI is associated with rates of postoperative complications and reoperations. Methods A retrospective longitudinal analysis of patients undergoing Lumbar spine surgery for disc herniation and/or spinal stenosis was undertaken using the MarketScan® databases from 2007–2015. Propensity-score matched cohorts were constructed to compare rates of complications and reoperations in patients with and without preoperative ESI. Results Within the year prior to surgery, 120,898 (46.4%) patients had a lumber ESI. The median time between ESI and surgery was 10 weeks. 23.1% of patients having preoperative ESI had more than one level injected, and 66.5% had more than one preoperative ESI treatment. Patients with chronic pain were considerably more likely to have an ESI prior to their surgery [OR 1.62 (1.54, 1.69), p  

  • Preoperative epidural steroid injections are not associated with increased rates of infection and dural tear in Lumbar spine surgery
    European Spine Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jayme C. B. Koltsov, Ivan Cheng, Matthew W. Smuck, Todd F. Alamin, Kirkham B. Wood, Serena S. Hu
    Abstract:

    Purpose The study objectives were to use a large national claims data resource to examine rates of preoperative epidural steroid injections (ESI) in Lumbar spine surgery and determine whether preoperative ESI or the timing of preoperative ESI is associated with rates of postoperative complications and reoperations. Methods A retrospective longitudinal analysis of patients undergoing Lumbar spine surgery for disc herniation and/or spinal stenosis was undertaken using the MarketScan® databases from 2007–2015. Propensity-score matched cohorts were constructed to compare rates of complications and reoperations in patients with and without preoperative ESI. Results Within the year prior to surgery, 120,898 (46.4%) patients had a lumber ESI. The median time between ESI and surgery was 10 weeks. 23.1% of patients having preoperative ESI had more than one level injected, and 66.5% had more than one preoperative ESI treatment. Patients with chronic pain were considerably more likely to have an ESI prior to their surgery [OR 1.62 (1.54, 1.69), p  

Serena S. Hu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Preoperative epidural steroid injections are not associated with increased rates of infection and dural tear in Lumbar spine surgery
    European Spine Journal, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jayme C. B. Koltsov, Ivan Cheng, Matthew W. Smuck, Todd F. Alamin, Kirkham B. Wood, Serena S. Hu
    Abstract:

    Purpose The study objectives were to use a large national claims data resource to examine rates of preoperative epidural steroid injections (ESI) in Lumbar spine surgery and determine whether preoperative ESI or the timing of preoperative ESI is associated with rates of postoperative complications and reoperations. Methods A retrospective longitudinal analysis of patients undergoing Lumbar spine surgery for disc herniation and/or spinal stenosis was undertaken using the MarketScan® databases from 2007–2015. Propensity-score matched cohorts were constructed to compare rates of complications and reoperations in patients with and without preoperative ESI. Results Within the year prior to surgery, 120,898 (46.4%) patients had a lumber ESI. The median time between ESI and surgery was 10 weeks. 23.1% of patients having preoperative ESI had more than one level injected, and 66.5% had more than one preoperative ESI treatment. Patients with chronic pain were considerably more likely to have an ESI prior to their surgery [OR 1.62 (1.54, 1.69), p  

Karl Droese – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • correlation of microtrauma in the Lumbar spine with intraosseous pressures
    Spine, 1994
    Co-Authors: Narayan Yoganandan, Sanford J Larson, Michael R Gallagher, Frank A Pintar, John Reinartz, Karl Droese
    Abstract:

    This study was conducted to determine the relatianship between intraosseous pressure and vertebral microtrauma in the Lumbar spine. Functional spinal units were excised from human cadavers. Radio-opaque dye was injected into the nucleus. Miniature transducers were inserted into the vertebrae to record intraosseus pressures. Compressive loading was applied quasistaticallV (2 mm/sec) until injury occurred. Movement of the contrast medium was monitored under fluoroscopy. The subchondral endplate was the most vulnerable component for initiation of injury to the lumar spine segment. In the initial stages of loading, the vertebral endplates gradually bulged outward, with the contrast medium staying within the nucleus