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Metabolism – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Toru Fujiwara – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Yuelin Song – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • characterization of in vitro and in vivo metabolites of carnosic acid a natural antioxidant by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry
    Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yuelin Song, Jinfeng Chen, Yitao Wang, Yong Jiang, Pengfei Tu
    Abstract:

    Abstract Carnosic acid (CA) is a widely employed antioxidant and the main active component in rosemary and sage, but its Metabolism remains largely unknown. The present study investigated the Metabolism of CA in vitro and in vivo for the first time, using high performance liquid chrochromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-trap-MS). A couple of scan modes were adopted in mass spectrometer domain, including Q1 full scan, neutral loss scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (NL-IDA-EPI) and precursor ion scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (PI-IDA-EPI). In particular, a prediction was carried out on the basis of in vitro Metabolism results, and gave birth to a multiple ion monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (MIM-IDA-EPI) mode aiming to detect the trace metabolites in CA-treated biological samples. A total of ten metabolites (M4–13), along with three degradative products (M1–3), were identified for CA from in vitro Metabolism models, including liver microsomes of human and rats (HLMs and RLMs), human intestinal microsomes (HIMs) and two species of Cunninghamella elegans . Twelve (U1–12) and six (F1–6) metabolites were detected from CA-treated urine and feces, respectively. In addition, five metabolites (SM2–6) in vivo were purified and definitely identified using NMR spectroscopy. The results of both in vitro and in vivo Metabolism studies indicated poor metabolic stability for CA, and the glucuronidation and oxidation Metabolisms extensively occurred for CA in vitro , while oxidation, glucuronidation and methylation were the main metabolic pathways observed in vivo .

Pengfei Tu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • characterization of in vitro and in vivo metabolites of carnosic acid a natural antioxidant by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry
    Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yuelin Song, Jinfeng Chen, Yitao Wang, Yong Jiang, Pengfei Tu
    Abstract:

    Abstract Carnosic acid (CA) is a widely employed antioxidant and the main active component in rosemary and sage, but its Metabolism remains largely unknown. The present study investigated the Metabolism of CA in vitro and in vivo for the first time, using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-trap-MS). A couple of scan modes were adopted in mass spectrometer domain, including Q1 full scan, neutral loss scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (NL-IDA-EPI) and precursor ion scan-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (PI-IDA-EPI). In particular, a prediction was carried out on the basis of in vitro Metabolism results, and gave birth to a multiple ion monitoring-information dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion (MIM-IDA-EPI) mode aiming to detect the trace metabolites in CA-treated biological samples. A total of ten metabolites (M4–13), along with three degradative products (M1–3), were identified for CA from in vitro Metabolism models, including liver microsomes of human and rats (HLMs and RLMs), human intestinal microsomes (HIMs) and two species of Cunninghamella elegans . Twelve (U1–12) and six (F1–6) metabolites were detected from CA-treated urine and feces, respectively. In addition, five metabolites (SM2–6) in vivo were purified and definitely identified using NMR spectroscopy. The results of both in vitro and in vivo Metabolism studies indicated poor metabolic stability for CA, and the glucuronidation and oxidation Metabolisms extensively occurred for CA in vitro , while oxidation, glucuronidation and methylation were the main metabolic pathways observed in vivo .

Ian Fairweather – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The comparative Metabolism of triclabendazole sulphoxide by triclabendazole-susceptible and triclabendazole-resistant Fasciola hepatica
    Parasitology Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark W. Robinson, Jill Lawson, Alan Trudgett, Elizabeth M. Hoey, Ian Fairweather
    Abstract:

    Benzimidazole anthelmintics are widely used against nematode, cestode and trematode parasites. The drugs undergo several enzyme-mediated reactions within the host animal that produce a number of metabolites. Although it has been shown that certain helminths, including Fasciola hepatica , can metabolise albendazole, nothing is known regarding the ability of the liver fluke to metabolise triclabendazole, which is the major flukicidal compound currently on the market. In the current study, adult triclabendazole-susceptible flukes were treated with triclabendazole sulphoxide in vitro, and the Metabolism of the drug was monitored by high performance liquid chrochromatography. The data show that F. hepatica can metabolise triclabendazole sulphoxide into its relatively inert sulphone metabolite. Parallel experiments using triclabendazole-resistant flukes showed that the conversion of triclabendazole sulphoxide to triclabendazole sulphone was on average 20.29% greater in the resistant flukes compared with the susceptible flukes. The results are discussed with regard to the mechanism of triclabendazole resistance in F. hepatica .

Miyako Kusano – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of molybdenum deficiency and defects in molybdate transporter mot1 on transcript accumulation and nitrogen sulphur Metabolism in arabidopsis thaliana
    Journal of Experimental Botany, 2011
    Co-Authors: Miyako Kusano, Akira Oikawa, Atsushi Fukushima, Hajime Tomatsu, Kazuki Saito, Masami Yokota Hirai, Toru Fujiwara
    Abstract:

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a micronutrient essential for plant growth, as several key enzymes of plant metabolic pathways contain Mo cofactor in their catalytic centres. Mo-containing oxidoreductases include nitrate reductase, sulphite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidase. These are involved in nitrate assimilation, sulphite detoxification, purine Metabolism or the synthesis of abscisic acid, auxin and glucosinolates in plants. To understand the effects of Mo deficiency and a mutation in a molybdate transporter, MOT1, on nitrogen and sulphur Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana, transcript and metabolite profiling of the mutant lacking MOT1 was conducted in the presence or absence of Mo. Transcriptome analysis revealed that Mo deficiency had impacts on genes involved in Metabolisms, transport, stress responses, and signal transductions. The transcript level of a nitrate reductase NR1 was highly induced under Mo deficiency in mot1-1. The metabolite profiles were analysed further by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and ultra high performance liquid chromatography. The levels of amino acids, sugars, organic acids, and purine metabolites were altered significantly in the Mo-deficient plants. These results are the first investigation of the global effect of Mo nutrition and MOT1 on plant gene expressions and Metabolism.

  • Effects of molybdenum deficiency and defects in molybdate transporter MOT1 on transcript accumulation and nitrogen/sulphur Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana
    Journal of Experimental Botany, 2010
    Co-Authors: Miyako Kusano, Akira Oikawa, Atsushi Fukushima, Hajime Tomatsu, Kazuki Saito, Masami Yokota Hirai, Toru Fujiwara
    Abstract:

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a micronutrient essential for plant growth, as several key enzymes of plant metabolic pathways contain Mo cofactor in their catalytic centres. Mo-containing oxidoreductases include nitrate reductase, sulphite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidase. These are involved in nitrate assimilation, sulphite detoxification, purine Metabolism or the synthesis of abscisic acid, auxin and glucosinolates in plants. To understand the effects of Mo deficiency and a mutation in a molybdate transporter, MOT1, on nitrogen and sulphur Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana, transcript and metabolite profiling of the mutant lacking MOT1 was conducted in the presence or absence of Mo. Transcriptome analysis revealed that Mo deficiency had impacts on genes involved in Metabolisms, transport, stress responses, and signal transductions. The transcript level of a nitrate reductase NR1 was highly induced under Mo deficiency in mot1-1. The metabolite profiles were analysed further by using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and ultra high performance liquid chromatography. The levels of amino acids, sugars, organic acids, and purine metabolites were altered significantly in the Mo-deficient plants. These results are the first investigation of the global effect of Mo nutrition and MOT1 on plant gene expressions and Metabolism.