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Reaction Time

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Mark Hallett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Simple Reaction Time to focal transcranial magnetic stimulation. Comparison with Reaction Time to acoustic, visual and somatosensory stimuli.
    Brain, 1992
    Co-Authors: Alvaro Pascual-leone, J. P. Brasil-neto, Josep Valls-solé, Leonardo G. Cohen, Mark Hallett
    Abstract:

    We studied the effect of different go-signals on the Reaction Time in nine normal human subjects trained to respond by rapidly flexing one arm. Reaction Times to auditory stimuli were shorter than those to visual or somatosensory stimuli, and were inversely correlated with the stimulus intensity. The Reaction Time was longest to a transcranial (magnetic or electric) stimulus delivered over the contralateral motor cortex that was sufficiently strong to induce a motor evoked potential in the responding biceps. Conversely, Reaction Time was shortest to either subthreshold transcranial stimulation over the same scalp position or to transcranial stimulation over the ipsilateral motor cortex regardless of intensity. Suprathreshold transcranial stimulation to the motor cortex seems to transiently inhibit the neurons responsible for initiation of motor programs involving muscles in which motor evoked potentials have been induced, thereby prolonging the Reaction Time. On the other hand, a subthreshold stimulus either disinhibits or directly activates such neurons leading to a shorter Reaction Time. Transcallosal connections between the motor cortices may account for the short Reaction Time to ipsilateral transcranial stimulation.

Marc Jubeau – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Is Reaction Time altered by mental or physical exertion
    European journal of applied physiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yann Le Mansec, Sylvain Dorel, Antoine Nordez, Marc Jubeau
    Abstract:

    Purpose Reaction Time, classically divided into premotor Time and electromechanical delay (EMD), can be determinant in daily life or sport situations. While some previous studies reported a negative impact of both muscle and mental fatigue on Reaction Time, the respective contributions of premotor Time and EMD to the changes of Reaction Time remains unclear. The aim of the study was, therefore, to assess the effects of both muscle and mental effort on Reaction Time and its components.

Siem Oppe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Subjective probability and choice Reaction Time
    Acta Psychologica, 2002
    Co-Authors: Len F.w. De Klerk, Siem Oppe
    Abstract:

    Abstract A two-choice Reaction Time study was undertaken designed to test the basic assumptions of the De Klerk-Oppe model. The assumptions are: (1) choice Reaction Time (CRT) is a linear function of subjective probability; (2) CRT is a logistic function of the Bayesian log likelihood ratio (BLLR); (3) the asymptotic data, which are obtained when BLLR → + ∞, are to be regarded as estimations of the individual simple Reaction Times (SRT). The first two hypotheses were verified, the latter was not. A possible explanation has been given for the substantial differences that were found between the expected SRTs and the observed SRTs.

Alvaro Pascual-leone – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Simple Reaction Time to focal transcranial magnetic stimulation. Comparison with Reaction Time to acoustic, visual and somatosensory stimuli.
    Brain, 1992
    Co-Authors: Alvaro Pascual-leone, J. P. Brasil-neto, Josep Valls-solé, Leonardo G. Cohen, Mark Hallett
    Abstract:

    We studied the effect of different go-signals on the Reaction Time in nine normal human subjects trained to respond by rapidly flexing one arm. Reaction Times to auditory stimuli were shorter than those to visual or somatosensory stimuli, and were inversely correlated with the stimulus intensity. The Reaction Time was longest to a transcranial (magnetic or electric) stimulus delivered over the contralateral motor cortex that was sufficiently strong to induce a motor evoked potential in the responding biceps. Conversely, Reaction Time was shortest to either subthreshold transcranial stimulation over the same scalp position or to transcranial stimulation over the ipsilateral motor cortex regardless of intensity. Suprathreshold transcranial stimulation to the motor cortex seems to transiently inhibit the neurons responsible for initiation of motor programs involving muscles in which motor evoked potentials have been induced, thereby prolonging the Reaction Time. On the other hand, a subthreshold stimulus either disinhibits or directly activates such neurons leading to a shorter Reaction Time. Transcallosal connections between the motor cortices may account for the short Reaction Time to ipsilateral transcranial stimulation.

Richard G. Benton – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • MODIFICATION OF GALVANIC SKIN RESPONSES BY Reaction Time MEASUREMENTS
    Psychophysiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: C. Douglas Mcdaniel, Roy B. Mefferd, Betty A. Wieland, Timothy G. Sadler, Richard G. Benton
    Abstract:

    Galvanic skin responses (GSRs) were measured on 12 male Ss under four conditions: rest, Reaction Time measurements, a cold pressor, and a combination of cold pressor and Reaction Time measurements. Both Reaction Time measurements alone and cold pressor alone caused increased sympathetic activity, but when the former was combined with cold pressor the ongoing autonomic activity was depressed.