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Supramolecular Chemistry

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Jean-marie Lehn - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry: Where from? Where to?
    Chemical Society Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jean-marie Lehn
    Abstract:

    It is difficult to determine when the area termed “Supramolecular Chemistry” started and thus what anniversary there really is.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry concepts and perspectives
    2014
    Co-Authors: Jean-marie Lehn
    Abstract:

    Part 1 From molecular to Supramolecular Chemistry: concepts and language of Supramolecular Chemistry. Part 2 Molecular recognition: recognition, information, complementarity molecular receptors - design principles spherical recognition - cryptates of metal cations tetrahedral recognition by macrotricyclic cryptands recognition of ammonium ions and related substrates binding and recognition of neutral moelcules. Part 3 Anion co-ordination Chemistry and the recognition of anionic substrates. Part 4 Coreceptor molecules and multiple recognition: dinuclear and polynuclear metal ion cryptates linear recognition of molecular length by ditopic coreceptors heterotopic coreceptors - cyclophane receptors, amphiphilic receptors, large molecular cage multiple recognition in metalloreceptors Supramolecular dynamics. Part 5 Supramolecular reactivity and catalysis: catalysis by reactive macrocyclic cation receptor molecules catalysis by reactive anion receptor molecules catalysis with cyclophane type receptors Supramolecular metallo-catalysis cocatalysis - catalysis of synthetic reactions biomolecular and abiotic catalysis. Part 6 Transport processes and carrier design: carrier-mediated transport cation-transport processes - cation carriers anion transport processes - anion carriers coupled transport processes electron-coupled transpoort in a redox gradient proton-coupled transport in a pH gradient light-coupled transport processes transfer via transmembrane channels. Part 7 From supermolecules to polymolecular assemblies: heterogeneous molecular recognition - Supramolecular solid materials from endoreceptors to exoreceptors - molecular recognition at surfaces molecular and Supramolecular morphogenesis Supramolecular heterogeneous catalysis. Part 8 Molecular and Supramolecular devices: molecular recognition, information and signals - semioChemistry Supramolecular photoChemistry - molecular and Supramolecular photonic devices light conversion and energy transfer devices photosensitive molecular receptors photoinduced electron transfer in photoactive devices photoinduced reactions in Supramolecular species non-linear optical properties of Supramolecular species Supramolecular effects in photochemical hole burning molecular and Supramolecular electronic devices Supramolecular electroChemistry electron conducting devices - molecular wires polarized molecular wires - rectifying devices modified and switchable molecular wires molecular magnetic devices molecular and Supramolecular ionic devices tubular mesophases. (Part contents).

  • Supramolecular Chemistry and self-assembly: Viewpoint
    Science -- Toward self-organization and complex matter, 2002
    Co-Authors: Jean-marie Lehn
    Abstract:

    Beyond molecular Chemistry based on the covalent bond, Supramolecular Chemistry aim is at developing highly complex chemical systems from components interacting through noncovalent intermolecular forces. Over the past quarter century, Supramolecular Chemistry has grown into a major field and has fueled numerous developments at the interfaces with biology and physics. Some of the conceptual advances and future challenges are profiled here.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry / Science
    Supramolecular Science: Where It Is and Where It Is Going, 1999
    Co-Authors: Jean-marie Lehn
    Abstract:

    Supramolecular Chemistry has over the last quarter of a century grown into a major field of Chemistry and has fueled numerous developments in the related areas of biology and physics, thus giving rise to the emergence and establishment of Supramolecular science (and technology), as a broad multi- and inter-disciplinary domain providing a highly fertile ground for the creativity of scientists from all origins. Its impact has been analyzed in a recent commentary on the theme of the present meeting [1], and illustrated by the perceptive presentation of five selected topics of Supramolecular Chemistry by some of the major players in the field [2–6]. The chapters in this book provide further extensive coverage and markedly widen the scope.

  • comprehensive Supramolecular Chemistry
    1996
    Co-Authors: J L Atwood, Jean-marie Lehn
    Abstract:

    Volume 1 - Molecular Recognition: Receptors for Cationic Guests. Volume 2 - Molecular Recognition: Receptors for Molecular Guests. Volume 3 - Cyclodextrins. Volume 4 - Supramolecular Reactivity and Transport: Bioorganic Systems. Volume 5 - Supramolecular Reactivity and Transport: Bioinorganic Systems. Volume 6 - Solid-State Supramolecular Chemistry: Crystal Engineering. Volume 7 - Solid-State Supramolecular Chemistry: Two- and Three-Dimensional Inorganic Networks. Volume 8 - Physical Methods in Supramolecular Chemistry. Volume 9 - Templating Self-Assembly and Self-Organization. Voulme 10 - Supramolecular Technology. Volume 11 - Cumulative Index.

Eric V. Anslyn - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Practical applications of Supramolecular Chemistry
    Chemical Society Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Igor V. Kolesnichenko, Eric V. Anslyn
    Abstract:

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of Charles Pedersen's discovery of crown ethers, what is widely considered the birth of Supramolecular Chemistry. Since then, the field has progressed greatly, winning two Nobel Prizes and seeing the implementation of many practical applications. In commemoration, we are exploring the more recent advances of the field, which have made it past the realm of Chemistry, into the real world. Though not a comprehensive review, the topics that we discuss here are Supramolecular sensors, imaging for medical applications, metal extraction from ores and nuclear waste, as well as drug delivery.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry at the interface of biology, materials and medicine
    Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: Eric V. Anslyn, Steven C. Zimmerman
    Abstract:

    What do art, auto-mechanics, a rural Australian and Chinese village, two civil wars, and house building have to do with Supramolecular Chemistry? Unless you are an avid cover-to-cover reader of the Thematic Series of the Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry and happened upon the issue entitled “Supramolecular Chemistry at the interface of biology, materials and medicine”, there is no possible way you would see the connection between these disparate items. In fact, these are part of the childhood recollections of several leading practitioners in the field of Supramolecular Chemistry and the authors of the mini-reviews in this Thematic Series. Before explaining the purpose of these recollections in more detail, an overview of this Thematic Series is needed. We had two main goals in putting this Thematic Series together: (1) to highlight where the field of Supramolecular Chemistry is today, how it got there, and where it is going, and (2) to provide personal, autobiographies of leading practitioners of the field. The most important goal was to have a diverse group of experts in the field of Supramolecular Chemistry give an account of the state-of-the-art from their own unique perspective and subarea. There is an enormous amount still to learn about the fundamental nature of noncovalent interactions and particularly how to design and synthesize molecules that complex other molecules or are able to assemble spontaneously into three-dimensional structures. Thus, a major focus of the mini-reviews in this issue is on developing the Supramolecular toolkit and better understanding how individual tools work and how they can be used to construct complex systems non-covalently. The field of Supramolecular Chemistry has advanced over the past three decades and that success has allowed for a dramatic expansion in the field. In particular, much more attention is now paid to solving societal problems using Supramolecular tools and the principles of Supramolecular Chemistry. The title of this Thematic Series was chosen to highlight three fields – biology, materials, and medicine – where the interface with Chemistry has led to many important applications of Supramolecular Chemistry. Indeed, the reader will learn about how Supramolecular discoveries in the laboratory have been translated into commercial products that can both improve and even save human lives. It is now cliche to note that the earliest interest in Supramolecular Chemistry can be found in Emil Fischer’s famous lock and key analogy for enzymatic catalysis. If the origins of the field can be traced to that analogy made over a century ago, the event that propelled the field of Supramolecular Chemistry forward like no other occurred about thirty years ago. Thus, the joint 1987 Nobel Prize to Donald J. Cram, Jean-Marie Lehn, and Charles J. Pedersen “for their development and use of molecules with structure-specific interactions of high selectivity” [1] is often cited by senior members of the field as an inspirational event that both validated the field and signaled its future potential. The mini-reviews herein illustrate how that potential has been realized in multiple areas across a wide chemical landscape over the past thirty years. The articles also highlight future challenges and opportunities. The second goal of this Thematic Series is more unusual. Over drinks at a workshop we wondered why our colleagues and we chose to pursue a career in Supramolecular Chemistry. Was it because as children we all played with Lego building blocks or Tinker Toys? Or was it some other reason? In turn, that got us thinking about the more human aspects of science. What did our parents do and how did they, along with our early life experiences influence our careers? What choices were made along the way and how did our research careers unfold? Rarely do students hear the stories behind the publications and the careers. Thus, the diversity in our authors was intended to have those stories reflect faculty at different stages of their careers, in different countries and with very different backgrounds. At their core, these reviews are about the science of Supramolecular Chemistry and where the field is today and where it is going in the future. They also offer an intimate portrait of the people behind the work. We know that our authors greatly enjoyed telling their stories and we hope that the readers, particularly students, will find this perspective interesting and perhaps even helpful and inspirational. Eric V. Anslyn and Steven C. Zimmerman Austin, Urbana, May 2016

  • Art, auto-mechanics, and Supramolecular Chemistry. A merging of hobbies and career
    Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry, 2016
    Co-Authors: Eric V. Anslyn
    Abstract:

    While the strict definition of Supramolecular Chemistry is “Chemistry beyond the molecule”, meaning having a focus on non-covalent interactions, the field is primarily associated with the creation of synthetic receptors and self-assembly. For synthetic ease, the receptors and assemblies routinely possess a high degree of symmetry, which lends them an aspect of aesthetic beauty. Pictures of electron orbitals similarly can be seen as akin to works of art. This similarity was an early draw for me to the fields of Supramolecular Chemistry and molecular orbital theory, because I grew up in a household filled with art. In addition to art, my childhood was filled with repairing and constructing mechanical entities, such as internal combustion motors, where many components work together to achieve a function. Analogously, the field of Supramolecular Chemistry creates systems of high complexity that achieve functions or perform tasks. Therefore, in retrospect a career in Supramolecular Chemistry appears to be simply an extension of childhood hobbies involving art and auto-mechanics.

  • the uses of Supramolecular Chemistry in synthetic methodology development examples of anion and neutral molecular recognition
    Chemical Society Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A Joyce, Shagufta H Shabbir, Eric V. Anslyn
    Abstract:

    The principles of Supramolecular Chemistry have successfully permeated through a broad range of organic Chemistry subdisciplines. One subdiscipline that is not routinely associated with Supramolecular Chemistry is that of organic synthetic methodology. Though sometimes indiscernible, non-bonded and bonding Supramolecular interactions play a large role in chemical reactions and catalysis. Many synthetic methods hinge on the creation of anionic charge, albeit just partial, at some step during this process, and hence are prime targets for molecular recognition interactions. Examples are artificial enzymes, biomimetic catalysis, organocatalysis, and many of the catalysts that are derived from a combinatorial screen. Further, Supramolecular Chemistry is playing an increasingly large role in high-throughput analytical techniques. This tutorial review ties together Supramolecular approaches to methodology creation, combinatorial screening, and analytical protocols. The goal is to show, and further predict, that Supramolecular Chemistry will continually increase its impact in organic synthetic methodology development.

Leo A Joyce - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the uses of Supramolecular Chemistry in synthetic methodology development examples of anion and neutral molecular recognition
    Chemical Society Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A Joyce, Shagufta H Shabbir, Eric V. Anslyn
    Abstract:

    The principles of Supramolecular Chemistry have successfully permeated through a broad range of organic Chemistry subdisciplines. One subdiscipline that is not routinely associated with Supramolecular Chemistry is that of organic synthetic methodology. Though sometimes indiscernible, non-bonded and bonding Supramolecular interactions play a large role in chemical reactions and catalysis. Many synthetic methods hinge on the creation of anionic charge, albeit just partial, at some step during this process, and hence are prime targets for molecular recognition interactions. Examples are artificial enzymes, biomimetic catalysis, organocatalysis, and many of the catalysts that are derived from a combinatorial screen. Further, Supramolecular Chemistry is playing an increasingly large role in high-throughput analytical techniques. This tutorial review ties together Supramolecular approaches to methodology creation, combinatorial screening, and analytical protocols. The goal is to show, and further predict, that Supramolecular Chemistry will continually increase its impact in organic synthetic methodology development.

Philip A Gale - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry anniversary.
    Chemical Society reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: David B. Amabilino, Philip A Gale
    Abstract:

    Guest editors David B. Amabilino and Philip A. Gale introduce the Supramolecular Chemistry Anniversary issue of Chemical Society Reviews.

  • Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials - Definition and Emergence of Supramolecular Chemistry
    Supramolecular Chemistry, 2012
    Co-Authors: Jonathan W. Steed, Jerry L. Atwood, Philip A Gale
    Abstract:

    This chapter traces the changing scope in the understanding of Supramolecular Chemistry and its parallel, convergent evolution with nanoscale technology. Starting with the discovery of clathrate hydrates and zeolites in the beginning of the nineteenth century, key milestones such as the realization of the concepts of receptor, binding' and the lock and key model are charted. We look at the birth of the discipline of Supramolecular host–guest from macrocylic Chemistry and its evolution via self-assembly into its modern incarnation in the study of modular, pre programmed, and informed matter. We describe how a chemical and molecular approach is fundamental to the understanding of convergent (equilibrium) self-assembly, emergent features arising from non-equilibrium systems and nanoscale Chemistry. Keywords: Supramolecular; definition; clathrate; host–guest; self-assembly; self-organization; crystal engineering; inclusion

  • Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials - Supramolecular Chemistry: From Molecules to Nanomaterials
    2012
    Co-Authors: Philip A Gale, Jonathan W. Steed
    Abstract:

    This chapter addresses stereochemical consequences in Supramolecular Chemistry in terms of both the components and the ultimate assembly. In particular, it discusses the important (and sometimes elusive) concept of chirality in Supramolecular aggregates—its origin, the practical aspects of separation of chiral forms and their identification and quantification. The examples taken are predominantly from metalloSupramolecular systems: the deliberate construction of chiral oligonuclear assemblies as well as the principles that guide the phenomenon of self-assembly of the components, which give rise to (inter alia) helicates, catenanes, knots, and polygons—many of which are inherently chiral. Because of the possible variations of structural motifs—in terms of both metal centers and their geometries, and of ligand types—metalloSupramolecular Chemistry can realize an extraordinary range of assemblies, which are not only elegant in design and varied in nature but also provide the potential for the development of new materials in nanoscience

  • 9 Supramolecular Chemistry
    Natural Product Reports, 2004
    Co-Authors: Philip A Gale
    Abstract:

    The following short review covers some of the advances in Supramolecular Chemistry for the year 2003 and, as was the case with the previous reviews in this series, is not a comprehensive treatment of the literature. The review is split into three sections that cover molecular recognition, structure and assembly and potential future applications.

  • 7 Supramolecular Chemistry
    Annual Reports Section "B" (Organic Chemistry), 2003
    Co-Authors: Philip A Gale
    Abstract:

    The following short review covers some of the advances in Supramolecular Chemistry for the year 2002 and, as was the case with the previous review in this series, it is not a comprehensive treatment of the literature. The review is split into three sections that cover recognition, structure and assembly, and future applications.

Manuela Herman - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Comprehensive Supramolecular Chemistry
    2016
    Co-Authors: Manuela Herman
    Abstract:

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