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Vagrancy

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Vagrancy - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

David Hitchcock - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • he is the vagabond that hath no habitation in the lord the representation of quakerism as Vagrancy in interregnum england c 1650 1660
    Cultural & Social History, 2018
    Co-Authors: David Hitchcock
    Abstract:

    AbstractThis article examines the printed representation, and prosecutorial characterisation, of the movements, actions and motivations of early Quakers as vagrant. It argues that the prevalence and power of representing (and subsequently treating) early Quakers as vagrants is an understudied aspect of the social and cultural history of the Society of Friends, particularly in Interregnum England. As evidence, it interrogates a furious pamphlet debate between mid-century religious writers and preachers, who devoted much time and ink to painting Quakers as mendacious vagabonds, and Quaker ‘First Publishers’, who responded at length and in a striking way to these accusations. The article concludes that these images of Quakerism as a form of ‘spiritual Vagrancy’ created historically significant echoes in English and Atlantic culture.

  • ‘He is the Vagabond that Hath No Habitation in the Lord’: The Representation of Quakerism as Vagrancy in Interregnum England, c. 1650–1660
    Cultural & Social History, 2018
    Co-Authors: David Hitchcock
    Abstract:

    AbstractThis article examines the printed representation, and prosecutorial characterisation, of the movements, actions and motivations of early Quakers as vagrant. It argues that the prevalence and power of representing (and subsequently treating) early Quakers as vagrants is an understudied aspect of the social and cultural history of the Society of Friends, particularly in Interregnum England. As evidence, it interrogates a furious pamphlet debate between mid-century religious writers and preachers, who devoted much time and ink to painting Quakers as mendacious vagabonds, and Quaker ‘First Publishers’, who responded at length and in a striking way to these accusations. The article concludes that these images of Quakerism as a form of ‘spiritual Vagrancy’ created historically significant echoes in English and Atlantic culture.

  • a typology of travellers migration justice and Vagrancy in warwickshire 1670 1730
    Rural History-economy Society Culture, 2012
    Co-Authors: David Hitchcock
    Abstract:

    This paper examines the relief of travellers in Warwickshire, England. By using an unusually rich set of Constables Accounts for the parish of Grandborough, it interrogates the relationship between charity, local justice, and both official and popular perceptions of migration. It argues that the large number of migrants who passed through rural parishes were categorised by the local constable according to cultural and discretionary criteria. This typology of travellers determined the nature and extent of the relief they might receive and the actions that might be taken against them. Socially threatening migrants, such as poor pregnant women, the sick, and vagrants, also found themselves affected by this same proscriptive calculation, often to their detriment.

  • A Typology of Travellers: Migration, Justice, and Vagrancy in Warwickshire, 1670–1730
    Rural History, 2012
    Co-Authors: David Hitchcock
    Abstract:

    AbstractThis paper examines the relief of travellers in Warwickshire, England. By using an unusually rich set of Constables’ Accounts for the parish of Grandborough, it interrogates the relationship between charity, local justice, and both official and popular perceptions of migration. It argues that the large number of migrants who passed through rural parishes were categorised by the local constable according to cultural and discretionary criteria. This ‘typology’ of travellers determined the nature and extent of the relief they might receive and the actions that might be taken against them. Socially threatening migrants, such as poor pregnant women, the sick, and vagrants, also found themselves affected by this same ‘proscriptive calculation’, often to their detriment.

Risa L. Goluboff - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • United States Vagrancy Laws
    Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History, 2018
    Co-Authors: Risa L. Goluboff, Adam Sorensen
    Abstract:

    The crime of Vagrancy has deep historical roots in American law and legal culture. Originating in 16th-century England, Vagrancy laws came to the New World with the colonists and soon proliferated throughout the British colonies and, later, the United States. Vagrancy laws took myriad forms, generally making it a crime to be poor, idle, dissolute, immoral, drunk, lewd, or suspicious. Vagrancy laws often included prohibitions on loitering—wandering around without any apparent lawful purpose—though some jurisdictions criminalized loitering separately. Taken together, vaguely worded Vagrancy, loitering, and suspicious persons laws targeted objectionable “out of place” people rather than any particular conduct. They served as a ubiquitous tool for maintaining hierarchy and order in American society. Their application changed alongside perceived threats to the social fabric, at different times and places targeting the unemployed, labor activists, radical orators, cultural and sexual nonconformists, racial and religious minorities, civil rights protesters, and the poor. By the mid-20th century, Vagrancy laws served as the basis for hundreds of thousands of arrests every year. But over the course of just two decades, the crime of Vagrancy, virtually unquestioned for four hundred years, unraveled. Profound social upheaval in the 1960s produced a concerted effort against the Vagrancy regime, and in 1972, the US Supreme Court invalidated the laws. Local authorities have spent the years since looking for alternatives to the many functions Vagrancy laws once served.

  • dispatch from the supreme court archives Vagrancy abortion and what the links between them reveal about the history of fundamental rights
    Stanford Law Review, 2009
    Co-Authors: Risa L. Goluboff
    Abstract:

    This Essay explores the implications for constitutional history of several documents I found in the archives of Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas, William J. Brennan, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Potter Stewart, and Harry Blackmun. In particular, I discuss (1) portions of an early draft of Justice Douglas’s opinion in the 1972 Vagrancy case of Papachristou v. City of Jacksonville; (2) memoranda from Justices Brennan and Stewart about that opinion; and (3) memoranda between Justices Brennan and Douglas about Roe v. Wade. These documents - which I have reproduced in an appendix - shed new light on several apparently disparate issues in constitutional law: the Supreme Court’s use of void-for-vagueness doctrine; the social and constitutional history of Vagrancy law; the possibility and contours of constitutional regulation of substantive criminal law; the relationship between Papachristou and Roe; and the development and conceptualization of substantive due process. These documents invite us to think both more deeply and more broadly about who was engaged in constructing the intellectual framework of modern fundamental rights, about where in the constitution such rights would be located, and about what the contours of such rights would be.

Sigrid Wadauer - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • establishing distinctions unemployment versus Vagrancy in austria from the late nineteenth century to 1938
    International Review of Social History, 2011
    Co-Authors: Sigrid Wadauer
    Abstract:

    This paper deals with the making of Vagrancy in the context of early state welfare policy. Vagrancy is neither understood as an anachronism nor as deviance or marginality. Rather, it raises central questions concerning social policy and the history of labour. Starting from the problems of definition in the context of contemporary transnational debates, I will then focus on the practical implementation of distinctions in Austria from the late nineteenth century to the Anschluss in 1938. Different practices of varying efficacy will be accounted for, starting with the first attempts to formalize unemployment emerging in the late nineteenth century, when, based on a new understanding of unemployment as an effect of the labour market, new forms of supporting and regulating those wayfarers in search of employment were established. Such practices also aimed at outlawing Vagrancy, with consistent penalties under the law. In addition, Vagrancy will be discussed with respect to changing political regimes. Focusing on the 1920s and 1930s, the paper analyses crime statistics and crime records, and last but not least, the perspective of those who were “on the tramp”.

  • Establishing Distinctions: Unemployment versus Vagrancy in Austria from the Late Nineteenth Century to 1938 *
    International Review of Social History, 2011
    Co-Authors: Sigrid Wadauer
    Abstract:

    This paper deals with the making of Vagrancy in the context of early state welfare policy. Vagrancy is neither understood as an anachronism nor as deviance or marginality. Rather, it raises central questions concerning social policy and the history of labour. Starting from the problems of definition in the context of contemporary transnational debates, I will then focus on the practical implementation of distinctions in Austria from the late nineteenth century to the Anschluss in 1938. Different practices of varying efficacy will be accounted for, starting with the first attempts to formalize unemployment emerging in the late nineteenth century, when, based on a new understanding of unemployment as an effect of the labour market, new forms of supporting and regulating those wayfarers in search of employment were established. Such practices also aimed at outlawing Vagrancy, with consistent penalties under the law. In addition, Vagrancy will be discussed with respect to changing political regimes. Focusing on the 1920s and 1930s, the paper analyses crime statistics and crime records, and last but not least, the perspective of those who were “on the tramp”.

Morgane Barbetmassin - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • climate change and rates of Vagrancy of siberian bird species to europe
    Ibis, 2013
    Co-Authors: Frederic Jiguet, Morgane Barbetmassin
    Abstract:

    To assess whether increasing numbers of Siberian vagrants observed in Europe in recent autumns can be linked to climate change, we predicted changes in the climatic suitability of the breeding ranges of 46 Siberian bird species known to show Vagrancy to Europe and compared these predictions with observed changes in recorded rates of autumn Vagrancy across eight European countries during the last three decades. There was a positive correlation between predicted increase in breeding range and Vagrancy rates. A positive impact of climate change on range and population size could promote Vagrancy, while the increasing use of such alternative migration flyways could provide adaptive advantages in a changing environment.

David Dayson - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The TAPS Project. 12: Crime, Vagrancy, Death and Readmission of the Long-Term Mentally Ill During Their First Year of Local Reprovision
    British Journal of Psychiatry, 1993
    Co-Authors: David Dayson
    Abstract:

    The extent of crime, Vagrancy, death, and readmission in a prospective cohort of long-term mentally ill patients was measured during their first year out of hospital. All 278 long-stay psychiatric patients discharged during the first three years (1985-1988) of the closure of Friern and Claybury Hospitals were included. One patient was imprisoned, one committed suicide, and one became vagrant; five others may also have become vagrant. The mortality rate was similar for the leavers and their matched controls, who remained in hospital. There was one suicide among the matches. Mental deterioration most often caused readmission. On recovery, most patients returned to their community home. Six per cent of the cohort were readmitted and have remained in hospital for a year or more. With careful planning and a financial ‘dowry’ for each patient, the closure of large mental hospitals does not lead to a marked increase in Vagrancy, crime, and mortality for the long-term mentally ill. However, the patients who have yet to leave have more problems of social behaviour and are likely to be more difficult to resettle.

  • the taps project 12 crime Vagrancy death and readmission of the long term mentally ill during their first year of local reprovision
    The British journal of psychiatry. Supplement, 1993
    Co-Authors: David Dayson
    Abstract:

    The extent of crime, Vagrancy, death, and readmission in a prospective cohort of long-term mentally ill patients was measured during their first year out of hospital. All 278 long-stay psychiatric patients discharged during the first three years (1985-1988) of the closure of Friern and Claybury Hospitals were included. One patient was imprisoned, one committed suicide, and one became vagrant; five others may also have become vagrant. The mortality rate was similar for the leavers and their matched controls, who remained in hospital. There was one suicide among the matches. Mental deterioration most often caused readmission. On recovery, most patients returned to their community home. Six per cent of the cohort were readmitted and have remained in hospital for a year or more. With careful planning and a financial 'dowry' for each patient, the closure of large mental hospitals does not lead to a marked increase in Vagrancy, crime, and mortality for the long-term mentally ill. However, the patients who have yet to leave have more problems of social behaviour and are likely to be more difficult to resettle. Language: en