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Johanna W Lampe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, and COMT Polymorphisms with Serum and Urinary Sex Hormone Concentrations in Postmenopausal Women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2004
    Co-Authors: Shelley S. Tworoger, Johanna W Lampe, Charlotte Atkinson, Jessica Chubak, Erin J. Aiello, Cornelia M Ulrich, John D Potter, Yutaka Yasui, Patricia L. Stapleton, Fredrico M. Farin
    Abstract:

    Women with high circulating estrogen concentrations have an increased risk of breast cancer; thus, it is important to understand factors, including genetic variability, that influence estrogen concentrations. Several genetic polymorphisms that may influence sex hormone concentrations have been identified, including CYP17 (5′-untranslated region T–>C), CYP19 [intron 4 (TTTA)(n = 7-13) and a 3-bp deletion (-3)], CYP1B1 (Val(432)Leu), and COMT (Val(108/158)Met). We examined associations between these polymorphisms and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary concentrations of 2- and 16alphaHydroxyestrone in 171 postmenopausal women, using data from the prerandomization visit of an exercise clinical trial. Participants were sedentary, not taking hormone therapy, and had a body mass index >24.0. Compared with noncarriers, women carrying two CYP19 7r(-3) alleles had 26% lower estrone (P < 0.001), 19% lower estradiol (P = 0.01), 23% lower free estradiol (P = 0.01), and 22% higher sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.06). Compared with noncarriers, women carrying at least one CYP19 8r allele had 20% higher estrone (P = 0.003), 18% higher estradiol (P = 0.02), and 21% higher free estradiol concentrations (P = 0.01). Women with the COMT Met/Met genotype had 28% higher 2-Hydroxyestrone (P = 0.08) and 31% higher 16alphaHydroxyestrone concentrations (P = 0.02), compared with Val/Val women. Few associations were found for CYP17 and CYP1B1 or with serum androgen concentrations. This study provides further evidence that genetic variation may appreciably alter sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women not taking hormone therapy.

Charlotte Atkinson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, and COMT Polymorphisms with Serum and Urinary Sex Hormone Concentrations in Postmenopausal Women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2004
    Co-Authors: Shelley S. Tworoger, Johanna W Lampe, Charlotte Atkinson, Jessica Chubak, Erin J. Aiello, Cornelia M Ulrich, John D Potter, Yutaka Yasui, Patricia L. Stapleton, Fredrico M. Farin
    Abstract:

    Women with high circulating estrogen concentrations have an increased risk of breast cancer; thus, it is important to understand factors, including genetic variability, that influence estrogen concentrations. Several genetic polymorphisms that may influence sex hormone concentrations have been identified, including CYP17 (5′-untranslated region T–>C), CYP19 [intron 4 (TTTA)(n = 7-13) and a 3-bp deletion (-3)], CYP1B1 (Val(432)Leu), and COMT (Val(108/158)Met). We examined associations between these polymorphisms and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary concentrations of 2- and 16alphaHydroxyestrone in 171 postmenopausal women, using data from the prerandomization visit of an exercise clinical trial. Participants were sedentary, not taking hormone therapy, and had a body mass index >24.0. Compared with noncarriers, women carrying two CYP19 7r(-3) alleles had 26% lower estrone (P < 0.001), 19% lower estradiol (P = 0.01), 23% lower free estradiol (P = 0.01), and 22% higher sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.06). Compared with noncarriers, women carrying at least one CYP19 8r allele had 20% higher estrone (P = 0.003), 18% higher estradiol (P = 0.02), and 21% higher free estradiol concentrations (P = 0.01). Women with the COMT Met/Met genotype had 28% higher 2-Hydroxyestrone (P = 0.08) and 31% higher 16alphaHydroxyestrone concentrations (P = 0.02), compared with Val/Val women. Few associations were found for CYP17 and CYP1B1 or with serum androgen concentrations. This study provides further evidence that genetic variation may appreciably alter sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women not taking hormone therapy.

Frank Z Stanczyk – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alphaHydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of genetic polymorphisms with serum estrogens measured multiple times during a 2-year period in premenopausal women
    Cancer epidemiology biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research cosponsored by the American Society of Pre, 2005
    Co-Authors: Galina Lurie, Frank Z Stanczyk, Gertraud Maskarinec, Rudolf Kaaks, Loic Le Marchand
    Abstract:

    There is evidence that circulating estrogens are associated with breast cancer risk. In this study of premenopausal women, we explored the association of polymorphisms in genes in the estrogen synthesis and metabolism pathways with serum and urinary levels of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) and with the urinary ratio of 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1)/16alphaHydroxyestrone (16alpha-OHE1). This analysis included 220 women, who were participants in a 2-year randomized soy intervention. Blood specimens were collected in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle an average of 4.4 times over 2 years. Overnight urinary specimens were collected on the same cycle day, only at baseline. Levels of E1, E2, 2-OHE1, and 16alpha-OHE1 were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The DNA samples were analyzed by PCR/RFLP for the COMT Val158Met, CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2B, CYP1A2*1F, CYP1B1 Val432Leu, and CYP17 T27C polymorphisms. We applied mixed models to investigate the relations between genotypes and repeated serum hormone measurements and generalized linear models to assess associations between genotypes and urinary estrogen metabolites. The CYP1A2 C allele was significantly associated with lower serum E2 levels; in CC genotype carriers, serum E2 levels were 26.3% lower than in homo- and heterozygous common allele carriers combined (P = 0.01). CYP1A2*1F also affected the urinary 2-OHE1/16alpha-OHE1 ratio; carriers of the variant C allele had a markedly lower ratio than individuals with the AA genotype (1.37 versus 1.76; P = 0.002). These data suggest that CYP1A2*1F is associated with lower circulating levels of E2, and that it may be a susceptibility locus for breast cancer.