16alpha Hydroxyestrone

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Johanna W Lampe - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, and COMT Polymorphisms with Serum and Urinary Sex Hormone Concentrations in Postmenopausal Women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2004
    Co-Authors: Shelley S. Tworoger, Patricia L. Stapleton, Charlotte Atkinson, Erin J. Aiello, Jessica Chubak, Yutaka Yasui, Johanna W Lampe, John D Potter, Cornelia M Ulrich, Fredrico M. Farin
    Abstract:

    Women with high circulating estrogen concentrations have an increased risk of breast cancer; thus, it is important to understand factors, including genetic variability, that influence estrogen concentrations. Several genetic polymorphisms that may influence sex hormone concentrations have been identified, including CYP17 (5'-untranslated region T-->C), CYP19 [intron 4 (TTTA)(n = 7-13) and a 3-bp deletion (-3)], CYP1B1 (Val(432)Leu), and COMT (Val(108/158)Met). We examined associations between these polymorphisms and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary concentrations of 2- and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in 171 postmenopausal women, using data from the prerandomization visit of an exercise clinical trial. Participants were sedentary, not taking hormone therapy, and had a body mass index >24.0. Compared with noncarriers, women carrying two CYP19 7r(-3) alleles had 26% lower estrone (P < 0.001), 19% lower estradiol (P = 0.01), 23% lower free estradiol (P = 0.01), and 22% higher sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.06). Compared with noncarriers, women carrying at least one CYP19 8r allele had 20% higher estrone (P = 0.003), 18% higher estradiol (P = 0.02), and 21% higher free estradiol concentrations (P = 0.01). Women with the COMT Met/Met genotype had 28% higher 2-Hydroxyestrone (P = 0.08) and 31% higher 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone concentrations (P = 0.02), compared with Val/Val women. Few associations were found for CYP17 and CYP1B1 or with serum androgen concentrations. This study provides further evidence that genetic variation may appreciably alter sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women not taking hormone therapy.

  • Effects of a moderate intensity exercise intervention on estrogen metabolism in postmenopausal women.
    Cancer epidemiology biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research cosponsored by the American Society of Pre, 2004
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Shelley S. Tworoger, Yutaka Yasui, Johanna W Lampe, Cornelia M Ulrich, Deborah J. Bowen, Robert S. Schwartz, Melinda L. Irwin, Bharat K. Rajan, John D Potter
    Abstract:

    Physical activity has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk, potentially via hormonal pathways, and high urinary excretion of 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OH E(1)) relative to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OH E(1)) also has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Studies suggest that body composition and exercise can influence estrogen metabolism. We determined the effects of a 12-month moderate intensity aerobic exercise intervention on urinary 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), and their ratio in overweight and obese, previously sedentary, postmenopausal women, ages 50-75 years. Women were randomized to a 12-month exercise intervention (n = 87) or stretching control group (n = 86); 170 completed the study. Urinary 2- and 16alpha-OH E(1) were measured in spot urines collected at baseline, 3, and 12 months. Body composition was measured at baseline and 12 months. Differences between exercisers and controls for excretion of estrogen metabolites were determined using general estimating equations. Further analyses assessed change in estrogen metabolites and their ratio by subgroups of change in body composition. Overall, there were no significant effects of the exercise intervention on 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), or their ratio (P > 0.05). There appeared to be an effect of change in intra-abdominal fat and adherence to the exercise intervention on change in the estrogen metabolites or their ratio. However, this did not reflect a potentially desirable change in estrogen metabolites associated with the exercise intervention. Thus, this 12-month moderate intensity exercise intervention did not significantly alter urinary excretion of 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), or their ratio in this population of women.

  • Urinary equol excretion in relation to 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16α-Hydroxyestrone concentrations: an observational study of young to middle-aged women
    The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Kristiina Wähälä, Heather E. Skor, E. Dawn Fitzgibbons, Delia Scholes, Chu Chen, Stephen M. Schwartz, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Approximately one-third to one-half of individuals harbor the colonic bacteria that are capable of metabolizing the soy isoflavone daidzein to equol. Results of prior studies suggest beneficial effects of producing equol in relation to breast cancer risk, potentially through effects on endogenous hormones. High urinary excretion of 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OH E(1)) relative to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OH E(1)) has been associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. In this pilot study we examined associations between urinary excretion of equol and 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), and their ratio, and investigated whether excretion of these estrogen metabolites differed between two samples collected 48h apart. Isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA), and equol) were measured in two overnight urines from 126 women. Excretion of 2-OH E(1) and 16alpha-OH E(1) were measured in the first overnight urine from all 126 women and in the second overnight urine from 30 of these women; there were no significant differences between samples collected 48h apart in excretion of 2-OH E(1) or 16alpha-OH E(1) (P=0.75 and 0.17, respectively). Among all women, correlations between total isoflavone excretion (sum of genistein, daidzein, ODMA, and equol) and estrogen metabolites were non-significant (P>0.05). Among women with detectable levels of equol, total isoflavone excretion was significantly positively correlated with 16alpha-OH E(1) (r=0.32, P=0.02), but was not correlated with 2-OH E(1) or 2-OH E(1):16alpha-OH E(1) ratio (r=0.21, P=0.14, and r=-0.05, P=0.70, respectively). Equol excretion (adjusted for other isoflavone excretion) was significantly positively correlated with 2-OH E(1):16alpha-OH E(1) ratio (r=0.38, P=0.005), but was not correlated with 2-OH E(1) or 16alpha-OH E(1) (r=0.15, P=0.29, and r=-0.17, P=0.24, respectively). The finding that equol excretion, but not total isoflavone excretion, correlated positively with the 2-OH E(1):16alpha-OH E(1) ratio suggests that the colonic bacterial profile associated with equol production may be involved in estrogen metabolism, and may therefore possibly influence breast cancer risk.

Charlotte Atkinson - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, and COMT Polymorphisms with Serum and Urinary Sex Hormone Concentrations in Postmenopausal Women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2004
    Co-Authors: Shelley S. Tworoger, Patricia L. Stapleton, Charlotte Atkinson, Erin J. Aiello, Jessica Chubak, Yutaka Yasui, Johanna W Lampe, John D Potter, Cornelia M Ulrich, Fredrico M. Farin
    Abstract:

    Women with high circulating estrogen concentrations have an increased risk of breast cancer; thus, it is important to understand factors, including genetic variability, that influence estrogen concentrations. Several genetic polymorphisms that may influence sex hormone concentrations have been identified, including CYP17 (5'-untranslated region T-->C), CYP19 [intron 4 (TTTA)(n = 7-13) and a 3-bp deletion (-3)], CYP1B1 (Val(432)Leu), and COMT (Val(108/158)Met). We examined associations between these polymorphisms and serum concentrations of estrogens, androgens, and sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary concentrations of 2- and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in 171 postmenopausal women, using data from the prerandomization visit of an exercise clinical trial. Participants were sedentary, not taking hormone therapy, and had a body mass index >24.0. Compared with noncarriers, women carrying two CYP19 7r(-3) alleles had 26% lower estrone (P < 0.001), 19% lower estradiol (P = 0.01), 23% lower free estradiol (P = 0.01), and 22% higher sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations (P = 0.06). Compared with noncarriers, women carrying at least one CYP19 8r allele had 20% higher estrone (P = 0.003), 18% higher estradiol (P = 0.02), and 21% higher free estradiol concentrations (P = 0.01). Women with the COMT Met/Met genotype had 28% higher 2-Hydroxyestrone (P = 0.08) and 31% higher 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone concentrations (P = 0.02), compared with Val/Val women. Few associations were found for CYP17 and CYP1B1 or with serum androgen concentrations. This study provides further evidence that genetic variation may appreciably alter sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women not taking hormone therapy.

  • Serum steroid hormones, sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations, and urinary hydroxylated estrogen metabolites in post-menopausal women in relation to daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes.
    The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Cara L Frankenfeld, Charlotte Atkinson, Shelley S. Tworoger, Frank Z Stanczyk, Anne Mctiernan, Wendy K Thomas, Santica M Marcovina, David S Weigle, Noel S Weiss, Victoria L Holt
    Abstract:

    Equol and O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) are products of bacterial metabolism of daidzein, an isoflavone in soybeans; thus, the presence or absence of equol and/or O-DMA in urine is a marker of particular intestinal bacteria profiles. Plasma hormone concentrations may be lower in pre-menopausal women who harbor the bacteria capable of producing equol (equol producers) compared to women who do not (equol non-producers). We evaluated concentrations of serum hormones, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OH E(1)) and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OH E(1)) in relation to equol-producer and O-DMA-producer phenotypes in 89 post-menopausal women. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was 23% greater in O-DMA-producers compared to non-producers (P = 0.04). No significant differences in serum estrogens, androgens, metabolic hormones, or SHBG were observed in relation to either daidzein-metabolizing phenotype. Compared with non-producers within each phenotype, age-adjusted 2-OH E(1):16alpha-OH E(1) was 27% greater (P = 0.06) in equol-producers and 9% greater (P > 0.10) in O-DMA-producers, and 2-OH E(1) concentrations were 24% greater in equol producers (P = 0.07) and 42% greater in O-DMA producers (P = 0.02). No significant differences in 16alpha-OH E(1) were observed in relation to either phenotype. These results suggest that interindividual variability in intestinal bacteria may be related to differences in products of hormone metabolism in post-menopausal women.

  • Effects of a moderate intensity exercise intervention on estrogen metabolism in postmenopausal women.
    Cancer epidemiology biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research cosponsored by the American Society of Pre, 2004
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Shelley S. Tworoger, Yutaka Yasui, Johanna W Lampe, Cornelia M Ulrich, Deborah J. Bowen, Robert S. Schwartz, Melinda L. Irwin, Bharat K. Rajan, John D Potter
    Abstract:

    Physical activity has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk, potentially via hormonal pathways, and high urinary excretion of 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OH E(1)) relative to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OH E(1)) also has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Studies suggest that body composition and exercise can influence estrogen metabolism. We determined the effects of a 12-month moderate intensity aerobic exercise intervention on urinary 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), and their ratio in overweight and obese, previously sedentary, postmenopausal women, ages 50-75 years. Women were randomized to a 12-month exercise intervention (n = 87) or stretching control group (n = 86); 170 completed the study. Urinary 2- and 16alpha-OH E(1) were measured in spot urines collected at baseline, 3, and 12 months. Body composition was measured at baseline and 12 months. Differences between exercisers and controls for excretion of estrogen metabolites were determined using general estimating equations. Further analyses assessed change in estrogen metabolites and their ratio by subgroups of change in body composition. Overall, there were no significant effects of the exercise intervention on 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), or their ratio (P > 0.05). There appeared to be an effect of change in intra-abdominal fat and adherence to the exercise intervention on change in the estrogen metabolites or their ratio. However, this did not reflect a potentially desirable change in estrogen metabolites associated with the exercise intervention. Thus, this 12-month moderate intensity exercise intervention did not significantly alter urinary excretion of 2-OH E(1), 16alpha-OH E(1), or their ratio in this population of women.

Frank Z Stanczyk - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes in relation to serum hormones and sex hormone binding globulin, and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women in the United States
    Cancer causes & control : CCC, 2008
    Co-Authors: Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Katherine M. Newton, Kim C. Westerlind, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Blood and urine concentrations of hormones are implicated in the etiology of some cancers. Small studies have assessed relationships between production of the daidzein metabolites equol and O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) and hormones, but findings are unclear. We evaluated relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and follicular phase concentrations of estrogens, androgens, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary estrogen metabolites in premenopausal women. Two-hundred women collected a first-void urine sample after a 3-day soy challenge, and 191 and 193 provided fasting blood and spot urine samples, respectively, during days 5-9 of their menstrual cycle. Soy challenge urines were analyzed for isoflavones; serum was analyzed for estrogens, androgens, and SHBG; spot urines were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. Data were log-transformed and multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess relationships between daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes and hormones and SHBG. Data from 187 and 189 women were included in analyses of serum and urine hormones, respectively. 55 (27.5%) and 182 (91%) of the 200 women who provided a soy challenge urine sample were equol- and ODMA-producers (>87.5 ng/ml urine), respectively. In unadjusted analyses, equol-producers (n = 52) had lower free testosterone than equol non-producers (n = 137, p = 0.02). In adjusted analyses, there were no differences between producers and non-producers of either daidzein metabolite. In the absence of a soy intervention, we found no difference in serum or urine hormone concentrations between producers and non-producers of equol or ODMA.

  • A pilot and feasibility study on the effects of naturopathic botanical and dietary interventions on sex steroid hormone metabolism in premenopausal women
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 2007
    Co-Authors: Heather Greenlee, Charlotte Atkinson, Frank Z Stanczyk, Johanna W Lampe
    Abstract:

    Naturopathic physicians commonly make dietary and/or dietary supplement recommendations for breast cancer prevention. This placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, pilot study tested the effects of two naturopathic interventions over five menstrual cycles on sex steroid hormones and metabolic markers in 40 healthy premenopausal women. The intervention arms were as follows: combination botanical supplement (Curcuma longa, Cynara scolymus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Schisandra chinensis, Silybum marinum, and Taraxacum officinalis; n = 15), dietary changes (3 servings/d crucifers or dark leafy greens, 30 g/d fiber, 1-2 liters/d water, and limiting caffeine and alcohol consumption to 1 serving each/wk; n = 10), and placebo (n = 15). Early-and late-follicular phase serum samples from cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for estrogens (estrone, estrone-sulfate, total estradiol, and free estradiol), androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, total testosterone, and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, and metabolic markers (insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, and leptin). Serum samples collected during the mid-luteal phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for total estradiol, free estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Urine samples collected during the late follicular phase of cycles 1 and 5 were analyzed for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone. During the early follicular phase, compared with placebo, the botanical supplement decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (-13.2%; P = 0.02), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (-14.6%; P = 0.07), androstenedione (-8.6%; P = 0.05), and estrone-sulfate (-12.0%; P = 0.08). No other trends or statistically significant changes were observed. When comparing dietary changes with placebo, no statistically significant differences were observed. Overall, in this pilot study, the naturopathic interventions had no substantial effects on estrogen measures. Early-follicular phase androgens decreased with the botanical supplement.

  • Association of genetic polymorphisms with serum estrogens measured multiple times during a 2-year period in premenopausal women
    Cancer epidemiology biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research cosponsored by the American Society of Pre, 2005
    Co-Authors: Galina Lurie, Frank Z Stanczyk, Gertraud Maskarinec, Rudolf Kaaks, Loic Le Marchand
    Abstract:

    There is evidence that circulating estrogens are associated with breast cancer risk. In this study of premenopausal women, we explored the association of polymorphisms in genes in the estrogen synthesis and metabolism pathways with serum and urinary levels of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) and with the urinary ratio of 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1)/16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OHE1). This analysis included 220 women, who were participants in a 2-year randomized soy intervention. Blood specimens were collected in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle an average of 4.4 times over 2 years. Overnight urinary specimens were collected on the same cycle day, only at baseline. Levels of E1, E2, 2-OHE1, and 16alpha-OHE1 were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The DNA samples were analyzed by PCR/RFLP for the COMT Val158Met, CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2B, CYP1A2*1F, CYP1B1 Val432Leu, and CYP17 T27C polymorphisms. We applied mixed models to investigate the relations between genotypes and repeated serum hormone measurements and generalized linear models to assess associations between genotypes and urinary estrogen metabolites. The CYP1A2 C allele was significantly associated with lower serum E2 levels; in CC genotype carriers, serum E2 levels were 26.3% lower than in homo- and heterozygous common allele carriers combined (P = 0.01). CYP1A2*1F also affected the urinary 2-OHE1/16alpha-OHE1 ratio; carriers of the variant C allele had a markedly lower ratio than individuals with the AA genotype (1.37 versus 1.76; P = 0.002). These data suggest that CYP1A2*1F is associated with lower circulating levels of E2, and that it may be a susceptibility locus for breast cancer.

  • Serum steroid hormones, sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations, and urinary hydroxylated estrogen metabolites in post-menopausal women in relation to daidzein-metabolizing phenotypes.
    The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Cara L Frankenfeld, Charlotte Atkinson, Shelley S. Tworoger, Frank Z Stanczyk, Anne Mctiernan, Wendy K Thomas, Santica M Marcovina, David S Weigle, Noel S Weiss, Victoria L Holt
    Abstract:

    Equol and O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) are products of bacterial metabolism of daidzein, an isoflavone in soybeans; thus, the presence or absence of equol and/or O-DMA in urine is a marker of particular intestinal bacteria profiles. Plasma hormone concentrations may be lower in pre-menopausal women who harbor the bacteria capable of producing equol (equol producers) compared to women who do not (equol non-producers). We evaluated concentrations of serum hormones, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and urinary 2-Hydroxyestrone (2-OH E(1)) and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OH E(1)) in relation to equol-producer and O-DMA-producer phenotypes in 89 post-menopausal women. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was 23% greater in O-DMA-producers compared to non-producers (P = 0.04). No significant differences in serum estrogens, androgens, metabolic hormones, or SHBG were observed in relation to either daidzein-metabolizing phenotype. Compared with non-producers within each phenotype, age-adjusted 2-OH E(1):16alpha-OH E(1) was 27% greater (P = 0.06) in equol-producers and 9% greater (P > 0.10) in O-DMA-producers, and 2-OH E(1) concentrations were 24% greater in equol producers (P = 0.07) and 42% greater in O-DMA producers (P = 0.02). No significant differences in 16alpha-OH E(1) were observed in relation to either phenotype. These results suggest that interindividual variability in intestinal bacteria may be related to differences in products of hormone metabolism in post-menopausal women.

  • Do urinary estrogen metabolites reflect the differences in breast cancer risk between Singapore Chinese and United States African-American and white women?
    Cancer research, 2001
    Co-Authors: Giske Ursin, Frank Z Stanczyk, Melissa L. Wilson, Brian E. Henderson, Laurence N. Kolonel, Kristine R. Monroe, Hin-peng Lee, Adeline Seow, Elisabet Gentzschein
    Abstract:

    Breast cancer risk is substantially lower in Singapore than in women from the United STATES: Part of the risk discrepancy is probably explained by differences in the production of endogenous estrogens, but differences in the pathway by which estrogen is metabolized may also play a role. We undertook a study to determine whether the ratio of urinary 2-Hydroxyestrone (2OHE(1)):16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OHE(1)) was higher in Singapore Chinese than in a group of United States (predominantly African-American) women living in Los ANGELES: We also wanted to determine whether any difference in estrogen metabolite ratio between these two groups of women was greater than that in estrone (E(1)), estradiol (E(2)) and estriol (E(3)). The participants in this study were randomly selected healthy, non-estrogen using women participating in the Singapore Chinese Health Study (n = 67) or the Hawaii/Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort Study (n = 58). After adjusting for age and age at menopause, mean urinary 2-OHE(1) was only 23% (P = 0.03) higher in Singapore Chinese than in United States women, and there were no statistically significant differences in 16alpha-OHE(1) levels or in the ratio of 2-OHE(1):16alpha-OHE(1) between the two groups. The adjusted mean 2-OHE(1):16alpha-OHE(1) ratio was 1.63 in Singapore Chinese and 1.48 in United States women (P = 0.41). In contrast, the adjusted mean values of E1, E2, and E3 were 162% (P < 0.0001), 152% (P < 0.0001), and 92% (P = 0.0009) higher, respectively, in United States women than in Singapore Chinese women. Our study suggests that urinary E1, E2, and E3 reflect the differences in breast cancer risk between Singapore Chinese and United States women to a stronger degree than the estrogen metabolites 2OHE(1) and 16alpha-OHE(1) or the ratio of 2OHE(1):16alpha-OHE(1.)

Mindy S. Kurzer - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of Flaxseed Consumption on Urinary Levels of Estrogen Metabolites in Postmenopausal Women
    Nutrition and cancer, 2010
    Co-Authors: Susan R. Sturgeon, Stella L. Volpe, Elaine Puleo, Elizabeth R. Bertone-johnson, Joanna L. Heersink, Sara Sabelawski, Kristiina Wähälä, Carol Bigelow, Mindy S. Kurzer
    Abstract:

    Flaxseed is a rich source of dietary lignans. It has been hypothesized that lignans may decrease breast cancer risk through modulation of endogenous hormone levels. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed supplementation on urinary levels of estrogen metabolites that may be involved in the development of breast cancer. Forty-three postmenopausal women participated in this 12-wk preintervention-postintervention study. Participants consumed 7.5 g/day of ground flaxseed for 6 wk, followed by 15 g/day for an additional 6 wk. The mean urinary level of 16alpha -Hydroxyestrone (16alpha -OHE1) was higher at the end of 12 wk compared to baseline (change of 1.32 ug/day, P = 0.02). There was no significant change in 2-OHE1 excretion. The mean urinary level of the 2-OHE1/16alpha -OHE1 ratio was lower at the end of 12 wk compared to baseline (change of -1.1, P = 0.02). Mean urinary excretion of 2-methoxyestradiol was also lower at 12 wk than at baseline (P = 0.03). Based on the current paradigm of the effects of estrogen metabolism on breast cancer risk, the regimen of dietary flaxseed intake used in this study did not appear to favorably alter breast cancer risk through shifts in estrogen metabolism pathways in postmenopausal women.

  • Dietary Seaweed Modifies Estrogen and Phytoestrogen Metabolism in Healthy Postmenopausal Women
    The Journal of nutrition, 2009
    Co-Authors: Jane Teas, Daniel W. Sepkovic, James R. Hébert, Thomas G. Hurley, Adrian A. Franke, Mindy S. Kurzer
    Abstract:

    Seaweed and soy foods are consumed daily in Japan, where breast cancer rates for postmenopausal women are significantly lower than in the West. Likely mechanisms include differences in diet, especially soy consumption, and estrogen metabolism. Fifteen healthy postmenopausal women participated in this double-blind trial of seaweed supplementation with soy challenge. Participants were randomized to 7 wk of either 5 g/d seaweed (Alaria) or placebo (maltodextrin). During wk 7, participants also consumed a daily soy protein isolate (2 mg isoflavones/kg body weight). After a 3-wk washout period, participants were crossed over to the alternate supplement schedule. There was an inverse correlation between seaweed dose (mg/kg body weight) and serum estradiol (E2) (seaweed-placebo = y = -2.29 x dose + 172.3; r = -0.70; P = 0.003), [corrected] which was linear across the range of weights. Soy supplementation increased urinary daidzein, glycitein, genistein, and O-desmethylangolensin (P = 0.0001) and decreased matairesinol and enterolactone (P < 0.05). Soy and seaweed plus soy (SeaSoy) increased urinary excretion of 2-hydroxyestrogen (2-OHE) (P = 0.0001) and the ratio of 2-OHE:16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (16alphaOHE(1)) (P = 0.01). For the 5 equol excretors, soy increased urinary equol excretion (P = 0.0001); the combination of SeaSoy further increased equol excretion by 58% (P = 0.0001). Equol producers also had a 315% increase in 2:16 ratio (P = 0.001) with SeaSoy. Seaweed favorably alters estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolism and these changes likely include modulation of colonic bacteria.

  • Soy protein isolate increases urinary estrogens and the ratio of 2:16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in men at high risk of prostate cancer.
    The Journal of nutrition, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jill M. Hamilton-reeves, Salome A. Rebello, William Thomas, Joel W. Slaton, Mindy S. Kurzer
    Abstract:

    Specific estrogen metabolites may initiate and promote hormone-related cancers. In epidemiological studies, significantly lower excretion of urinary estradiol (E2) and lower ratio of urinary 2-hydroxy estrogens to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (2:16 OH-E1) have been reported in prostate cancer cases compared to controls. Although soy supplementation has been shown to increase the ratio 2:16 OH-E1 in women, no studies to our knowledge have investigated the effects of soy supplementation on estrogen metabolism in men. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of soy protein isolate consumption on estrogen metabolism in men at high risk for developing advanced prostate cancer. Fifty-eight men supplemented their habitual diets with 1 of 3 protein isolates: 1) isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate (SPI+) (107 mg isoflavones/d); 2) alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (SPI-) (

  • soy protein isolate increases urinary estrogens and the ratio of 2 16alpha Hydroxyestrone in men at high risk of prostate cancer
    Journal of Nutrition, 2007
    Co-Authors: Jill M Hamiltonreeves, Salome A. Rebello, William Thomas, Joel W. Slaton, Mindy S. Kurzer
    Abstract:

    Specific estrogen metabolites may initiate and promote hormone-related cancers. In epidemiological studies, significantly lower excretion of urinary estradiol (E2) and lower ratio of urinary 2-hydroxy estrogens to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (2:16 OH-E1) have been reported in prostate cancer cases compared to controls. Although soy supplementation has been shown to increase the ratio 2:16 OH-E1 in women, no studies to our knowledge have investigated the effects of soy supplementation on estrogen metabolism in men. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of soy protein isolate consumption on estrogen metabolism in men at high risk for developing advanced prostate cancer. Fifty-eight men supplemented their habitual diets with 1 of 3 protein isolates: 1) isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate (SPI+) (107 mg isoflavones/d); 2) alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (SPI-) (<6 mg isoflavones/d); or 3) milk protein isolate (MPI), each providing 40 g protein/d. At 0, 3, and 6 mo of supplementation, the urinary estrogen metabolite profile was measured by GC-MS. Both soy groups had higher E2 excretion than the MPI group at 3 and 6 mo. After 6 mo of supplementation, the SPI+ group had a significantly higher urinary 2:16 OH-E1 ratio than the MPI group. Increased urinary E2 excretion and 2:16 OH-E1 ratio in men consuming soy protein isolate are consistent with studies in postmenopausal women and suggest that soy consumption may be beneficial in men at high risk of progressing to advanced prostate cancer as a result of effects on endogenous estrogen metabolism.

  • The Effect of Soy Consumption on the Urinary 2:16-Hydroxyestrone Ratio in Postmenopausal Women Depends on Equol Production Status but Is Not Influenced by Probiotic Consumption
    The Journal of nutrition, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jennifer A. Nettleton, Herman Adlercreutz, William Thomas, Kristin A. Greany, Kerry E. Wangen, Mindy S. Kurzer
    Abstract:

    Some epidemiologic studies reported an association between a low ratio of urinary 2-hydroxyestrogens (2-hydroxyestradiol + 2-Hydroxyestrone) to 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (2:16OHE(1)) and increased breast cancer risk. Some studies show that soy consumption increases this ratio, and it is suggested that this effect may reduce breast cancer risk. We hypothesized that consumption of probiotic bacteria would alter fecal bacteria and enzymes involved in soy isoflavone metabolism, thereby increasing isoflavone bioavailability and enhancing the beneficial effects of soy on estrogen metabolism. Breast cancer survivors (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) were given 4 treatments for 6 wk each, separated by 2-wk washout periods, in a randomized, crossover design: soy protein (26.6 +/- 4.5 g protein/d containing 44.4 +/- 7.5 mg isoflavones/d); soy protein + probiotics (10(9) colony-forming units Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS(R)+1 & Bifidobacterium longum, 15-30 mg fructooligosaccharide/d); milk protein (26.6 +/- 4.5 g protein/d); and milk protein + probiotics. Survivors tended to have a lower baseline urine 2:16OHE(1) ratio than controls (P = 0.10). In the group as a whole, soy consumption tended to increase urinary 2-hydroxyestrogens (P = 0.07) and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone (P = 0.11) but had no effect on the urinary 2:16OHE(1) ratio. When subjects were divided into groups by plasma concentrations and urinary levels of the daidzein metabolite equol, soy increased urinary 2-hydroxyestrogens (P = 0.01) and the 2:16OHE(1) ratio (P = 0.04) only in subjects with high plasma equol concentrations. None of these results were influenced by probiotic consumption. These results are consistent with studies that found lower urine 2:16OHE(1) ratios in women with breast cancer and suggest that soy consumption increases this ratio only in women who are equol producers.

Regina G. Ziegler - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Comparison of Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry, RIA, and ELISA Methods for Measurement of Urinary Estrogens
    Cancer epidemiology biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research cosponsored by the American Society of Pre, 2010
    Co-Authors: Jessica M. Faupel-badger, Barbara J. Fuhrman, Roni T. Falk, Larry K. Keefer, Timothy D. Veenstra, Robert N. Hoover, Regina G. Ziegler
    Abstract:

    Absolute and relative concentrations of estrogens and estrogen metabolites are important for clinical decisions as well as for epidemiologic, experimental, and clinical research on hormonal carcinogenesis. RIA and ELISA are routinely used for measuring estrogen metabolites in blood and urine due to efficiency and low cost. Here, we compare absolute and ranked concentrations of estrone, estradiol, and estriol measured by indirect RIA and of 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone measured by ELISA to the concentrations obtained using a novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, which measures 15 estrogen metabolites concurrently. We used overnight urine samples collected from control women (362 premenopausal and 168 postmenopausal) participating in a population-based case-control study of breast cancer among Asian American women ages 20 to 55 years. When comparing RIA or ELISA levels to LC-MS/MS, absolute concentrations for the five estrogen metabolites ranged from 1.6 to 2.9 and 1.4 to 11.8 times higher in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively (all P < 0.0001). However, LC-MS/MS measurements were highly correlated [Spearman r (r(s)) = 0.8-0.9] with RIA and ELISA measurements in premenopausal women and moderately correlated (r(s) = 0.4-0.8) in postmenopausal women. Measurements of the 2-Hydroxyestrone:16alpha-Hydroxyestrone ratio, a putative biomarker of breast cancer risk, were moderately correlated in premenopausal women (r(s) = 0.6-0.7) but only weakly correlated in postmenopausal women (r(s) = 0.2). LC-MS/MS had higher intraclass correlation coefficients (> or =99.6%) and lower coefficients of variation (< or =9.4%) than ELISA (> or =97.2% and < or =14.2%) and RIA (> or =95.2% and < or =17.8%). Comparison with the LC-MS/MS method suggests that the widely used RIA and ELISA estrogen metabolite measures may be problematic, especially at low estrogen metabolite levels characteristic of postmenopausal women.

  • Quantifying estrogen metabolism: an evaluation of the reproducibility and validity of enzyme immunoassays for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in urine.
    Environmental Health Perspectives, 1997
    Co-Authors: Regina G. Ziegler, S C Rossi, Thomas R. Fears, H L Bradlow, Herman Adlercreutz, D Sepkovic, P Kiuru, K Wahala, Jimmie B. Vaught, Jennifer L. Donaldson
    Abstract:

    Rapid and simple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were recently developed to measure 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in unextracted urine. The balance between these competing estrogen metabol...

  • Quantifying estrogen metabolism: an evaluation of the reproducibility and validity of enzyme immunoassays for 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in urine.
    Environmental health perspectives, 1997
    Co-Authors: Regina G. Ziegler, S C Rossi, Thomas R. Fears, H L Bradlow, Herman Adlercreutz, D Sepkovic, P Kiuru, K Wahala, Jimmie B. Vaught, Jennifer L. Donaldson
    Abstract:

    Rapid and simple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were recently developed to measure 2-Hydroxyestrone and 16alpha-Hydroxyestrone in unextracted urine. The balance between these competing estrogen metabolism pathways may serve as a biomarker of breast cancer risk. Before testing these assays in epidemiologic studies, we evaluated their reproducibility, and validity relative to gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Overnight 12-hr urine collections from five midfollicular premenopausal women, five midluteal premenopausal women, and five postmenopausal women were aliquoted and stored at -70 degrees C. Two aliquots from each woman were assayed with the EIAs in a random, blinded order, monthly over 4 months and 1 year later. Reproducibility over 4 months was good for both metabolites in premenopausal women (coefficient of variation = 8-14%) and satisfactory in postmenopausal women (approximately 19%). Reproducibility over 12 months remained good in premenopausal women, but was poor in postmenopausal women, with mean readings increasing 50 to 100%. Wide variation in estrogen metabolite levels enabled a single EIA measurement to characterize individual differences among premenopausal women in midfollicular (intraclass correlation coefficient = 98-99%) and midluteal phase (85-91%). A narrower range in metabolite levels among postmenopausal women reduced discrimination (78-82%). The correlation between EIA and GC-MS measurement was excellent for both metabolites (r>0.9), except for 2-Hydroxyestrone in postmenopausal women (r=0.6). Analysis of absolute agreement suggested that both EIAs were less sensitive than GC-MS, and each detected nonspecific background. The low concentration of estrogen metabolites in urine from postmenopausal women may explain the problems with reproducibility and validity in this menstrual group. Accordingly, more sensitive EIAs have been developed and are now being evaluated.