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2-Aminoacridone

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Patrick Camilleri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Nicola Volpi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Helen Birrell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Early indication of effects of puromycin aminonucleoside using a fluorimetric assay of 2-Aminoacridone-derivatized carbohydrates in urine.
    Analytical biochemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, David Tolson, John Connelly, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    This paper describes a novel noninvasive method to study the changes in free carbohydrates excreted in urine as a result of toxicity in the rat induced by the administration of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN). Urine samples were collected for 24 h prior to dosing and at 8, 24, and 32 h postdosing. For each sample, free carbohydrates were extracted from the urine using a graphitized carbon column and then labeled with 2-Aminoacridone (2-AMAC) prior to analysis by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILC). Dramatic changes were seen in the profile of the carbohydrates at the 8- and 24-h time points. These changes in carbohydrate profiles may be useful as early indicators of toxicity.

  • A probe for the versatile analysis and characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides.
    Analytical chemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, David Tolson, Andy Gribble, Vincent Burdes, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    A novel fluorescent probe, 3-(acetylamino)-6-aminoacridine (AA-Ac), has been synthesized and its applicability to the analysis of picomole levels of N-linked glycans investigated. AA-Ac was found to be an excellent derivatization reagent for N-linked glycans, giving at least twice the intensity of fluorescence as its predecessor 2-Aminoacridone. AA-Ac-labeled glycans were analyzed by both normal and reversed-phase HPLC. They were also amenable to enzymatic sequencing and analysis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, free zone capillary electrophoresis, and capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  • Analysis of oligosaccharides by microbore high-performance liquid chromatography.
    Analytical chemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, Jim Langridge, Edouard S. P. Bouvier, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    A 1-mm microbore hydrophilic interaction column has been used for the separation of 2-Aminoacridone (2-AMAC)-derivatized glycan mixtures, released from naturally occurring and recombinant proteins. Primary structure identification of the 2-AMAC glycan derivatives was carried out by HPLC using fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection. In some cases, enzymatic digestion of the 2-AMAC glycans was applied to confirm glycan structure. This strategy is considerably more rapid than methods normally used in glycan analysis, which involves manual collection of separated oligosaccharide derivatives and analysis of individual fractions by mass spectrometry.

Joanne Charlwood – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Early indication of effects of puromycin aminonucleoside using a fluorimetric assay of 2-Aminoacridone-derivatized carbohydrates in urine.
    Analytical biochemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, David Tolson, John Connelly, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    This paper describes a novel noninvasive method to study the changes in free carbohydrates excreted in urine as a result of toxicity in the rat induced by the administration of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN). Urine samples were collected for 24 h prior to dosing and at 8, 24, and 32 h postdosing. For each sample, free carbohydrates were extracted from the urine using a graphitized carbon column and then labeled with 2-Aminoacridone (2-AMAC) prior to analysis by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILC). Dramatic changes were seen in the profile of the carbohydrates at the 8- and 24-h time points. These changes in carbohydrate profiles may be useful as early indicators of toxicity.

  • A probe for the versatile analysis and characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides.
    Analytical chemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, David Tolson, Andy Gribble, Vincent Burdes, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    A novel fluorescent probe, 3-(acetylamino)-6-aminoacridine (AA-Ac), has been synthesized and its applicability to the analysis of picomole levels of N-linked glycans investigated. AA-Ac was found to be an excellent derivatization reagent for N-linked glycans, giving at least twice the intensity of fluorescence as its predecessor 2-Aminoacridone. AA-Ac-labeled glycans were analyzed by both normal and reversed-phase HPLC. They were also amenable to enzymatic sequencing and analysis by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, free zone capillary electrophoresis, and capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  • Analysis of oligosaccharides by microbore high-performance liquid chromatography.
    Analytical chemistry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Joanne Charlwood, Helen Birrell, Jim Langridge, Edouard S. P. Bouvier, Patrick Camilleri
    Abstract:

    A 1-mm microbore hydrophilic interaction column has been used for the separation of 2-Aminoacridone (2-AMAC)-derivatized glycan mixtures, released from naturally occurring and recombinant proteins. Primary structure identification of the 2-AMAC glycan derivatives was carried out by HPLC using fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection. In some cases, enzymatic digestion of the 2-AMAC glycans was applied to confirm glycan structure. This strategy is considerably more rapid than methods normally used in glycan analysis, which involves manual collection of separated oligosaccharide derivatives and analysis of individual fractions by mass spectrometry.

Robert J. Linhardt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Capillary Electrophoresis for the Analysis
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Of Glycosaminoglycan-derived Disaccharides, Yuqing Chang, Bo Yang, Amanda Weyers, Robert J. Linhardt
    Abstract:

    Capillary electrophoresis is a common technique used for glycosaminoglycan-derived disaccharide analysis because of its high resolving power, high separation ef fi ciency, high sensitivity, short analysis time, and straightforward operation. CE coupled to laser-induced fl uorescence (LIF) detection shows an approxi-mately 100 times higher sensitivity than traditional UV detection at 232 nm. 2-Aminoacridone (AMAC) is a widely used fl uorophore for labeling unsaturated disaccharides by deductive amination, which is one of the most important method of derivatization of disaccharides for CE-LIF detection. Outlined in this chapter is a protocol of analyzing glycosaminoglycan-derived disaccharides by CE-LIF with AMAC derivatization

  • Glycosaminoglycanomics of Cultured Cells Using a Rapid and Sensitive LC-MS/MS Approach
    ACS chemical biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Fang Tian, Linxia Zhang, Changhu Xue, Robert J. Linhardt
    Abstract:

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a family of polysaccharides widely distributed in eukaryotic cells, are responsible for a wide array of biological functions. Quantitative disaccharide compositional analysis is one of the primary ways to characterize the GAG structure. This structural analysis is typically time-consuming (1–2 weeks) and labor intensive, requiring GAG recovery and multistep purification, prior to the enzymatic/chemical digestion of GAGs, and finally their analysis. Moreover, 105–107 cells are usually required for compositional analysis. We report a sensitive, rapid, and quantitative analysis of GAGs present in a small number of cells. Commonly studied cell lines were selected based on phenotypic properties related to the biological functions of GAGs. These cells were lysed using a commercial surfactant reagent, sonicated, and digested with polysaccharide lyases. The resulting disaccharides were recovered by centrifugal filtration, labeled with 2-Aminoacridone, and analyzed by liquid chromatograp…

  • Analysis of glycosaminoglycan-derived, precolumn, 2-Aminoacridone–labeled disaccharides with LC-fluorescence and LC-MS detection
    Nature Protocols, 2014
    Co-Authors: Nicola Volpi, Fabio Galeotti, Bo Yang, Robert J. Linhardt
    Abstract:

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) possess considerable heterogeneity in average molecular mass, molecular mass range, disaccharide composition and content and position of sulfo groups. Despite recent technological advances in the analysis of GAGs, the determination of GAG disaccharide composition still remains challenging and provides key information required for understanding GAG function. Analysis of GAG-derived disaccharides relies on enzymatic treatment, providing one of the most practical and quantitative approaches for compositional mapping. Tagging the reducing end of disaccharides with an aromatic fluorescent label affords stable derivatives with properties that enable improved detection and resolution. HPLC with on-line electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) offers a relatively soft ionization method for detection and characterization of sulfated oligosaccharides. GAGs obtained from tissues, biological fluids or cells are treated with various enzymes to obtain disaccharides that are fluorescently labeled with 2-Aminoacridone (AMAC) and resolved by different LC systems for high-sensitivity detection by fluorescence, and then they are unambiguously characterized by MS. The preparation and labeling of GAG-derived disaccharides can be performed in ∼1–2 d, and subsequent HPLC separation and on-line fluorescence detection and ESI-MS analysis takes another 1–2 h.