3-Pentanol

14,000,000 Leading Edge Experts on the ideXlab platform

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

The Experts below are selected from a list of 5361 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Zuohua Huang - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The effect of pentanol addition on the particulate emission characteristics of a biodiesel operated diesel engine
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ke Yang, Chenglong Tang, Chun Shun Cheung, Long Wei, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study, combustion performance and the physical and chemical characteristics of soot particles from a DI diesel engine were studied. The engine was fueled with n -pentanol mixed with biodiesel at 15% and 30% by volume and operated at 1800 rpm under three engine loads (20%, 50% and 80% load). In comparison with pure biodiesel, the pentanol-biodiesel blends lead to delayed start of combustion and shortened combustion duration. The particle number concentrations of all size groups are reduced for biodiesel-pentanol blends in all the tested conditions, due to longer ignition delay time, lower viscosity and boiling point, and higher oxygen content of pentanol. The brake specific elemental carbon (EC) emissions of biodiesel were found to be lower compared to diesel and after adding pentanol in biodiesel, the EC emissions further decrease. While for organic carbon (OC) emissions, biodiesel and diesel are at similar level under the tested engine loads, and the blends show a higher fraction of OC at low and medium engine loads. The blended fuel with higher proportion of pentanol gives lower total particle-phase PAHs emissions and also a lower benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaP eq ) compared to pure biodiesel under the tested engine loads.

  • comparative study on the explosion characteristics of pentanol isomer air mixtures
    Fuel, 2015
    Co-Authors: Yu Cheng, Wu Jin, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract A comparative study was experimentally performed on the explosion characteristics of four pentanol isomer–air mixtures (n-pentanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-2-butanol), at various initial temperatures and initial pressures. The explosion parameters of explosion pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise, combustion duration and combustion development period were measured. The influence of initial conditions on the explosion characteristics were discussed. Results show that the peak explosion pressure is linear function of the reciprocal of initial temperature, but the maximum rate of pressure rise is insensitive to the temperature variation. With the initial pressure elevated from 0.1 to 0.25 MPa, the peak explosion pressure increases significantly, but the increase rate is decelerated when the pressure is further increased. Among the four pentanol isomer–air mixtures, in the order of n-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-2-butanol, the peak explosion pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise decrease while the combustion duration and flame development period increase, reflecting the decreasing flame speed. Difference among the isomers tends to be decreased for the peak explosion pressure while increased for the maximum rate of pressure rise with the increase of initial pressure. Pressure oscillation occurs at the rich mixture and high pressure, resulting in short combustion duration, but influencing the flame development period little.

  • Laminar Flame Speeds and Kinetic Modeling of n-Pentanol and Its Isomers
    Energy & Fuels, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chenglong Tang, Yu Cheng, Li Guan, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    A comprehensive experimental and computational study was conducted on the laminar combustion characteristics and chemical kinetics of four pentanol isomer–air mixtures (n-pentanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol). Experiments were performed at the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 1.8, three initial temperatures (393, 433, and 473 K), and four pressures (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 MPa) using outwardly propagating flames. Results show that the laminar flame speeds of the four pentanol isomers decrease in the order of n-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol. The most significant differences among the isomers are observed around the stoichiometric mixture. Simulations on the laminar flame speeds of n-pentanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol were respectively performed using the model of Heufer et al. and Sarathy et al. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental data show the n-pentanol model yields satisfactory agreement with the data at ...

  • Effect of n-pentanol addition on the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a direct-injection diesel engine
    Energy, 2014
    Co-Authors: Liangjie Wei, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of using a mixture of diesel and n-pentanol, which is one of the second-generation biofuels with comparable properties to diesel fuel, as fuel on the combustion, performance, and gaseous and particulate emissions of a naturally-aspirated, four-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine. Three n-pentanol fractions in the fuel mixture were selected: 10, 20 and 30% by volume. Results show that, the addition of n-pentanol leads to longer ignition delay and increases the peak heat release rate in the premixed combustion phase. The brake specific fuel consumption increases with increase of n-pentanol, while the brake thermal efficiency is not affected. Regarding the gaseous emissions, n-pentanol addition results in the following consequence: (a) HC (hydrocarbon) and CO (carbon monoxide) emissions increase for 30% n-pentanol in the blended fuel at low engine load but decrease at high engine load; (b) a slight increase (maximum 8%) in NOx emissions but noticeable increase in NO2 emissions. Regarding the particulate emissions, n-pentanol is found to be very promising in terms of reducing both the mass concentration and the particulate number concentration simultaneously.

  • high temperature ignition delay times of c5 primary alcohols
    Combustion and Flame, 2013
    Co-Authors: Chenglong Tang, Jiaxiang Zhang, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract Ignition delay times of the three C5 primary alcohol isomers (n-pentanol, iso-pentanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol) were measured behind reflected shock waves. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1100–1500 K, pressures of 1.0 and 2.6 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0, and O2 concentration in the fuel/O2/Ar mixtures varying from 3.75% to 15%. Measurements show that the ignition delay time and the global activation energy of the three isomers both decrease in the order of iso-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and n-pentanol. Chemical kinetic mechanisms for n-pentanol (Mech NP) and iso-pentanol (Mech IP), recently developed by Dagaut and co-workers, were used to model the respective ignition delay times. Results show that Mech NP yields close agreement at the equivalence ratio of 0.25, but the agreement is moderated with increasing equivalence ratio. Mech IP yields fairly close agreements at relatively higher temperatures but over-predicts the measurements by 50% at relatively lower temperatures for the three equivalence ratios studied. A new 2-methyl-1-butanol high temperature mechanism was proposed and validated against the ignition delay data. Sensitivity analysis for both n-pentanol and iso-pentanol showed the dominance of small radical reactions. Reaction pathway analysis aided further scrutiny of the fuel-specific reactions in Mech NP, leading to refinement of the kinetic model, and improved agreement between the predicted and measured ignition delay times as well as the jet-stirred reactor results.

Vicente Gomis - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Chenglong Tang - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The effect of pentanol addition on the particulate emission characteristics of a biodiesel operated diesel engine
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ke Yang, Chenglong Tang, Chun Shun Cheung, Long Wei, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract In the present study, combustion performance and the physical and chemical characteristics of soot particles from a DI diesel engine were studied. The engine was fueled with n -pentanol mixed with biodiesel at 15% and 30% by volume and operated at 1800 rpm under three engine loads (20%, 50% and 80% load). In comparison with pure biodiesel, the pentanol-biodiesel blends lead to delayed start of combustion and shortened combustion duration. The particle number concentrations of all size groups are reduced for biodiesel-pentanol blends in all the tested conditions, due to longer ignition delay time, lower viscosity and boiling point, and higher oxygen content of pentanol. The brake specific elemental carbon (EC) emissions of biodiesel were found to be lower compared to diesel and after adding pentanol in biodiesel, the EC emissions further decrease. While for organic carbon (OC) emissions, biodiesel and diesel are at similar level under the tested engine loads, and the blends show a higher fraction of OC at low and medium engine loads. The blended fuel with higher proportion of pentanol gives lower total particle-phase PAHs emissions and also a lower benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaP eq ) compared to pure biodiesel under the tested engine loads.

  • Laminar Flame Speeds and Kinetic Modeling of n-Pentanol and Its Isomers
    Energy & Fuels, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chenglong Tang, Yu Cheng, Li Guan, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    A comprehensive experimental and computational study was conducted on the laminar combustion characteristics and chemical kinetics of four pentanol isomer–air mixtures (n-pentanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol). Experiments were performed at the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 1.8, three initial temperatures (393, 433, and 473 K), and four pressures (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 MPa) using outwardly propagating flames. Results show that the laminar flame speeds of the four pentanol isomers decrease in the order of n-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol. The most significant differences among the isomers are observed around the stoichiometric mixture. Simulations on the laminar flame speeds of n-pentanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol were respectively performed using the model of Heufer et al. and Sarathy et al. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental data show the n-pentanol model yields satisfactory agreement with the data at ...

  • high temperature ignition delay times of c5 primary alcohols
    Combustion and Flame, 2013
    Co-Authors: Chenglong Tang, Jiaxiang Zhang, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract Ignition delay times of the three C5 primary alcohol isomers (n-pentanol, iso-pentanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol) were measured behind reflected shock waves. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1100–1500 K, pressures of 1.0 and 2.6 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0, and O2 concentration in the fuel/O2/Ar mixtures varying from 3.75% to 15%. Measurements show that the ignition delay time and the global activation energy of the three isomers both decrease in the order of iso-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and n-pentanol. Chemical kinetic mechanisms for n-pentanol (Mech NP) and iso-pentanol (Mech IP), recently developed by Dagaut and co-workers, were used to model the respective ignition delay times. Results show that Mech NP yields close agreement at the equivalence ratio of 0.25, but the agreement is moderated with increasing equivalence ratio. Mech IP yields fairly close agreements at relatively higher temperatures but over-predicts the measurements by 50% at relatively lower temperatures for the three equivalence ratios studied. A new 2-methyl-1-butanol high temperature mechanism was proposed and validated against the ignition delay data. Sensitivity analysis for both n-pentanol and iso-pentanol showed the dominance of small radical reactions. Reaction pathway analysis aided further scrutiny of the fuel-specific reactions in Mech NP, leading to refinement of the kinetic model, and improved agreement between the predicted and measured ignition delay times as well as the jet-stirred reactor results.

  • high temperature ignition delay times of c5 primary alcohols
    Combustion and Flame, 2013
    Co-Authors: Chenglong Tang, Jiaxiang Zhang, Zuohua Huang
    Abstract:

    Abstract Ignition delay times of the three C5 primary alcohol isomers (n-pentanol, iso-pentanol and 2-methyl-1-butanol) were measured behind reflected shock waves. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1100–1500 K, pressures of 1.0 and 2.6 atm, equivalence ratios of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0, and O2 concentration in the fuel/O2/Ar mixtures varying from 3.75% to 15%. Measurements show that the ignition delay time and the global activation energy of the three isomers both decrease in the order of iso-pentanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and n-pentanol. Chemical kinetic mechanisms for n-pentanol (Mech NP) and iso-pentanol (Mech IP), recently developed by Dagaut and co-workers, were used to model the respective ignition delay times. Results show that Mech NP yields close agreement at the equivalence ratio of 0.25, but the agreement is moderated with increasing equivalence ratio. Mech IP yields fairly close agreements at relatively higher temperatures but over-predicts the measurements by 50% at relatively lower temperatures for the three equivalence ratios studied. A new 2-methyl-1-butanol high temperature mechanism was proposed and validated against the ignition delay data. Sensitivity analysis for both n-pentanol and iso-pentanol showed the dominance of small radical reactions. Reaction pathway analysis aided further scrutiny of the fuel-specific reactions in Mech NP, leading to refinement of the kinetic model, and improved agreement between the predicted and measured ignition delay times as well as the jet-stirred reactor results.

Nadir Yilmaz - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a comparative analysis of n butanol diesel and 1 pentanol diesel blends in a compression ignition engine
    Fuel, 2018
    Co-Authors: Alpaslan Atmanli, Nadir Yilmaz
    Abstract:

    Abstract The use of alcohols in diesel engines is an alternative way of reducing dependence on diesel fuel. Specifically, higher alcohols such as n-butanol (nB) and 1-pentanol (Pn), which consist of high carbons and can be produced from mainly non-edible sources, can directly be mixed with diesel fuel which in return provides significant promise from economic and environmental stand points. For this reason, the examination of the use of such high-carbon alcohols in diesel engines has become significantly important in recent years. In this work, six different binary (D-nB and D-Pn) fuel mixtures were obtained by mixing the diesel fuel with n-butanol and 1-pentanol at low and high mixing ratios (5%, 25% and 35% alcohol by volume) and basic fuel properties were examined. The test fuels were tested at four different loads (0, 3, 6 and 9 kW) at a constant engine speed (1800 rpm) in a direct injection diesel engine with diesel as the reference fuel. Fuel properties of the binary fuels were in compliance with the European Norm (EN590) and all of the fuels exhibit a steady phase without any indication of phase separation. Compared to diesel fuel’s engine characteristics, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) increased by 14.02% in binary blends, resulting in a 7.36% reduction in brake thermal efficiency (BTE). However, exhaust gas temperature (EGT) increased by an average of 47.55%. The addition of 1-pentanol to diesel had a significant impact on the decrease of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions as an average decrease of 14.27% was observed. On the other hand, the higher latent heat of evaporation (LHE) of n-butanol and 1-pentanol had multiple disadvantageous outcomes such as a cooling effect in-cylinder, lower combustion efficiency and slightly higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions as compared to diesel. The results indicated that the binary blends with 35% alcohol content happened to be a promising alternative for lower NOx emissions at the expense of increasing CO and HC emissions. Overall, it is concluded that n-butanol and 1-pentanol blends can be safely used in diesel engines without any engine modification or any additive.

  • experimental evaluation of a diesel engine running on the blends of diesel and pentanol as a next generation higher alcohol
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli
    Abstract:

    Abstract Alcohols are effective alternatives for use in diesel engines. Higher alcohols, as opposed to lower-chain alcohols (methanol and ethanol) have a promising future for diesel engines. 1-Pentanol, a higher-chain alcohol, has better fuel characteristics and can be made of biomass. Thus, it is important to examine it, as well as, its blends with diesel fuel in internal combustion engines for the characteristics of emissions and power generation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-1-pentanol blends. For experimental use, fuel blends were prepared by adding 1-pentanol (5%, 10%, 20%, 25% and 35% by volume) into diesel to achieve blends of D95Pen5, D90Pen10, D80Pen20, D75Pen25 and D65Pen35. In order to determine engine characteristics, engine tests were performed at four engine loads (0, 1.5, 2.25 and 3 kW) with a constant engine speed (2000 rpm). The addition of 1-pentanol to diesel decreased lower heating value and cetane number (CN) of the blends. As compared to diesel fuel, the blends increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) but also had a positive impact on exhaust gas temperature (EGT). The higher latent heat of evaporation of 1-pentanol caused a cooling effect in-cylinder, reduction in combustion efficiency and increase in carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. Also, the addition of 1-pentanol to diesel had a significant impact on the increase of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions. However, the D95Pen5 blend does hold potential as a promising candidate for decreasing exhaust gas temperature, CO and NO x emissions, but at the expense of increasing HC emissions.

  • influence of 1 pentanol additive on the performance of a diesel engine fueled with waste oil methyl ester and diesel fuel
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli, Miquela Trujillo
    Abstract:

    Abstract Biodiesel cannot directly be used in diesel engines because some of its fuel properties which poorly affect engine operation but it can be blended with diesel fuel or alcohols. It is important to research fuels with high biodiesel concentration which can be alternatives to diesel and B20. 1-Pentanol, a higher alcohol, shows promise as an alternative fuel used as a fuel additive in diesel and/or biodiesel in compression ignition engines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of 1-pentanol in waste oil methyl ester (B) and diesel fuel (D) on the exhaust emissions and performance of a diesel engine operating at various loads, 0, 3, 6, and 9 kW, with a constant engine speed (1800 rpm). 1-Pentanol (10% and 20% by volume) was added to diesel fuel and waste oil methyl ester to create the following fuel blends: D90P10, D80P20, B90P10, and B80P20. Basic fuel properties were investigated and determined to be within the limit of standards. According to the engine test results, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and exhaust gas temperatures (EGT) increased with the addition of 1-pentanol to diesel and biodiesel. Testing shows that the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) decreased for the diesel fuel blends D90P10 and D80P20. In contrast, biodiesel blends B90P10 and B80P20 exhibited an increase in BTE. Diesel blends D90P10 and D80P20 increased carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions while reducing the production of the oxides of nitrogen (NO x ). Compared to other biodiesel blends, B80P20 reduced the production of CO, HC, and NO x emissions at 0 and 3 kW loads while increasing the production of these emissions at 6 and 9 kW loads.

  • Experimental assessment of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-1-pentanol blends
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli
    Abstract:

    Abstract Higher alcohols made of renewable resources have better fuel properties and can potentially serve as better alternatives than lower alcohols in fuel blends. 1-Pentanol, which has a chain of five carbons and can easily be blended with both diesel and biodiesel, is a promising type of alcohol for the future. The purpose of this work is to investigate the fuel properties of ternary blends of diesel (D), waste oil methyl ester (B) and the higher alcohol of 1-pentanol (Pen), the effects of such blends on engine performance and emissions of a diesel engine. By splash blending, several ternary blends were prepared: DB (80% diesel and 20% biodiesel by volume), D75B20Pen5 (75% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 5% 1-Pentanol), D70B20Pen10 (70% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 10% 1-Pentanol) and D60B20Pen20 (60% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 20% 1-pentanol). In order to determine engine performance and exhaust emissions, tests were performed at 3 engine loads (0, 1.5, 3 kW) with a constant engine speed (2000 rpm). Ternary blends increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) while decreased brake thermal efficiency (BTE) as compared to diesel fuel. Also, an increase of pentanol concentration had an increasing effect on exhaust gas temperature (EGT). The higher latent heat of evaporation caused a cooling effect, reduction in combustion efficiency and an increase in CO emissions. Similar to CO emissions, HC emissions of pentanol blends increased significantly. Also, the addition of pentanol to diesel-biodiesel blends has a significant impact on the increase of NO x emissions.

Alpaslan Atmanli - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a comparative analysis of n butanol diesel and 1 pentanol diesel blends in a compression ignition engine
    Fuel, 2018
    Co-Authors: Alpaslan Atmanli, Nadir Yilmaz
    Abstract:

    Abstract The use of alcohols in diesel engines is an alternative way of reducing dependence on diesel fuel. Specifically, higher alcohols such as n-butanol (nB) and 1-pentanol (Pn), which consist of high carbons and can be produced from mainly non-edible sources, can directly be mixed with diesel fuel which in return provides significant promise from economic and environmental stand points. For this reason, the examination of the use of such high-carbon alcohols in diesel engines has become significantly important in recent years. In this work, six different binary (D-nB and D-Pn) fuel mixtures were obtained by mixing the diesel fuel with n-butanol and 1-pentanol at low and high mixing ratios (5%, 25% and 35% alcohol by volume) and basic fuel properties were examined. The test fuels were tested at four different loads (0, 3, 6 and 9 kW) at a constant engine speed (1800 rpm) in a direct injection diesel engine with diesel as the reference fuel. Fuel properties of the binary fuels were in compliance with the European Norm (EN590) and all of the fuels exhibit a steady phase without any indication of phase separation. Compared to diesel fuel’s engine characteristics, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) increased by 14.02% in binary blends, resulting in a 7.36% reduction in brake thermal efficiency (BTE). However, exhaust gas temperature (EGT) increased by an average of 47.55%. The addition of 1-pentanol to diesel had a significant impact on the decrease of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions as an average decrease of 14.27% was observed. On the other hand, the higher latent heat of evaporation (LHE) of n-butanol and 1-pentanol had multiple disadvantageous outcomes such as a cooling effect in-cylinder, lower combustion efficiency and slightly higher carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions as compared to diesel. The results indicated that the binary blends with 35% alcohol content happened to be a promising alternative for lower NOx emissions at the expense of increasing CO and HC emissions. Overall, it is concluded that n-butanol and 1-pentanol blends can be safely used in diesel engines without any engine modification or any additive.

  • experimental evaluation of a diesel engine running on the blends of diesel and pentanol as a next generation higher alcohol
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli
    Abstract:

    Abstract Alcohols are effective alternatives for use in diesel engines. Higher alcohols, as opposed to lower-chain alcohols (methanol and ethanol) have a promising future for diesel engines. 1-Pentanol, a higher-chain alcohol, has better fuel characteristics and can be made of biomass. Thus, it is important to examine it, as well as, its blends with diesel fuel in internal combustion engines for the characteristics of emissions and power generation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-1-pentanol blends. For experimental use, fuel blends were prepared by adding 1-pentanol (5%, 10%, 20%, 25% and 35% by volume) into diesel to achieve blends of D95Pen5, D90Pen10, D80Pen20, D75Pen25 and D65Pen35. In order to determine engine characteristics, engine tests were performed at four engine loads (0, 1.5, 2.25 and 3 kW) with a constant engine speed (2000 rpm). The addition of 1-pentanol to diesel decreased lower heating value and cetane number (CN) of the blends. As compared to diesel fuel, the blends increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) but also had a positive impact on exhaust gas temperature (EGT). The higher latent heat of evaporation of 1-pentanol caused a cooling effect in-cylinder, reduction in combustion efficiency and increase in carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. Also, the addition of 1-pentanol to diesel had a significant impact on the increase of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions. However, the D95Pen5 blend does hold potential as a promising candidate for decreasing exhaust gas temperature, CO and NO x emissions, but at the expense of increasing HC emissions.

  • influence of 1 pentanol additive on the performance of a diesel engine fueled with waste oil methyl ester and diesel fuel
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli, Miquela Trujillo
    Abstract:

    Abstract Biodiesel cannot directly be used in diesel engines because some of its fuel properties which poorly affect engine operation but it can be blended with diesel fuel or alcohols. It is important to research fuels with high biodiesel concentration which can be alternatives to diesel and B20. 1-Pentanol, a higher alcohol, shows promise as an alternative fuel used as a fuel additive in diesel and/or biodiesel in compression ignition engines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of 1-pentanol in waste oil methyl ester (B) and diesel fuel (D) on the exhaust emissions and performance of a diesel engine operating at various loads, 0, 3, 6, and 9 kW, with a constant engine speed (1800 rpm). 1-Pentanol (10% and 20% by volume) was added to diesel fuel and waste oil methyl ester to create the following fuel blends: D90P10, D80P20, B90P10, and B80P20. Basic fuel properties were investigated and determined to be within the limit of standards. According to the engine test results, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and exhaust gas temperatures (EGT) increased with the addition of 1-pentanol to diesel and biodiesel. Testing shows that the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) decreased for the diesel fuel blends D90P10 and D80P20. In contrast, biodiesel blends B90P10 and B80P20 exhibited an increase in BTE. Diesel blends D90P10 and D80P20 increased carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions while reducing the production of the oxides of nitrogen (NO x ). Compared to other biodiesel blends, B80P20 reduced the production of CO, HC, and NO x emissions at 0 and 3 kW loads while increasing the production of these emissions at 6 and 9 kW loads.

  • Experimental assessment of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-1-pentanol blends
    Fuel, 2017
    Co-Authors: Nadir Yilmaz, Alpaslan Atmanli
    Abstract:

    Abstract Higher alcohols made of renewable resources have better fuel properties and can potentially serve as better alternatives than lower alcohols in fuel blends. 1-Pentanol, which has a chain of five carbons and can easily be blended with both diesel and biodiesel, is a promising type of alcohol for the future. The purpose of this work is to investigate the fuel properties of ternary blends of diesel (D), waste oil methyl ester (B) and the higher alcohol of 1-pentanol (Pen), the effects of such blends on engine performance and emissions of a diesel engine. By splash blending, several ternary blends were prepared: DB (80% diesel and 20% biodiesel by volume), D75B20Pen5 (75% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 5% 1-Pentanol), D70B20Pen10 (70% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 10% 1-Pentanol) and D60B20Pen20 (60% diesel, 20% biodiesel, 20% 1-pentanol). In order to determine engine performance and exhaust emissions, tests were performed at 3 engine loads (0, 1.5, 3 kW) with a constant engine speed (2000 rpm). Ternary blends increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) while decreased brake thermal efficiency (BTE) as compared to diesel fuel. Also, an increase of pentanol concentration had an increasing effect on exhaust gas temperature (EGT). The higher latent heat of evaporation caused a cooling effect, reduction in combustion efficiency and an increase in CO emissions. Similar to CO emissions, HC emissions of pentanol blends increased significantly. Also, the addition of pentanol to diesel-biodiesel blends has a significant impact on the increase of NO x emissions.