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3D Computed Tomography

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2919 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Coen A. Wijdicks – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Measurements of bone tunnel size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 2D versus 3D Computed Tomography model.
    Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Bernardo Crespo, Katharine J. Wilson, Shannon M. Pomeroy, Robert F. Laprade, Lars Engebretsen, Coen A. Wijdicks

    Abstract:

    Background
    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires a precise evaluation of previous tunnel locations and diameters. Enlargement of the tunnels, despite not usually affecting primary reconstruction outcomes, plays an important role in revision ACL management. Three dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) models are reported to be the most accurate method for identifying the tunnel position and possible conflicts with a revision tunnel placement. However, the ability of 3D CT to measure the tunnel size is still not proven. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of measuring the size of the bone tunnels in ACL reconstructed knees with 3D CT compared to the traditional two dimensional (2D) CT method.

  • Measurements of bone tunnel size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 2D versus 3D Computed Tomography model
    Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Bernardo Crespo, Katharine J. Wilson, Shannon M. Pomeroy, Robert F. Laprade, Lars Engebretsen, Coen A. Wijdicks

    Abstract:

    Background Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires a precise evaluation of previous tunnel locations and diameters. Enlargement of the tunnels, despite not usually affecting primary reconstruction outcomes, plays an important role in revision ACL management. Three dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) models are reported to be the most accurate method for identifying the tunnel position and possible conflicts with a revision tunnel placement. However, the ability of 3D CT to measure the tunnel size is still not proven. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of measuring the size of the bone tunnels in ACL reconstructed knees with 3D CT compared to the traditional two dimensional (2D) CT method. Methods Twenty-four patients had CT scans performed immediately following ACL reconstruction surgery. Their femoral tunnels size were measured by a standard 2D CT measurement and then compared with three novel 3D CT measuring methods: the best transverse section method, the best fit cylinder method and the wall thickness method. The drill size used during surgery was used as a control measure for the tunnel width. Intra-class correlation coefficients were obtained. Results The intra-class correlation coefficient and respective 95% confidence interval range (ICC [95%CI]) for the three methods compared with the drill sizes were 0.899 [0.811-0.947] for the best transverse section method, 0.745 [0.553-0.862] for the best fit cylinder method, −0.004 [−0.081 to −0.12] for the wall thickness method and 0.922 [0.713-0.97] for the 2D CT method. The mean differences compared to the drill size were 0.02 mm for the best fit transverse section method, 0.01 mm for the best fit cylinder diameter method, 3.34 mm for the wall thickness method and 0.29 mm for the 2D CT method. The intra-rater agreement (ICC [95%CI]) was excellent for the best transverse section method 0.999 [0.998-0.999] and the 2D CT method 0.969 [0.941-0.984]. Conclusions The 3D best transverse section method presented a high correlation to the drill sizes and high intra-rater agreement, and was the best method for ACL tunnel evaluation in a 3D CT based model.

Bernardo Crespo – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Measurements of bone tunnel size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 2D versus 3D Computed Tomography model.
    Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Bernardo Crespo, Katharine J. Wilson, Shannon M. Pomeroy, Robert F. Laprade, Lars Engebretsen, Coen A. Wijdicks

    Abstract:

    Background
    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires a precise evaluation of previous tunnel locations and diameters. Enlargement of the tunnels, despite not usually affecting primary reconstruction outcomes, plays an important role in revision ACL management. Three dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) models are reported to be the most accurate method for identifying the tunnel position and possible conflicts with a revision tunnel placement. However, the ability of 3D CT to measure the tunnel size is still not proven. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of measuring the size of the bone tunnels in ACL reconstructed knees with 3D CT compared to the traditional two dimensional (2D) CT method.

  • Measurements of bone tunnel size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 2D versus 3D Computed Tomography model
    Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Bernardo Crespo, Katharine J. Wilson, Shannon M. Pomeroy, Robert F. Laprade, Lars Engebretsen, Coen A. Wijdicks

    Abstract:

    Background Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires a precise evaluation of previous tunnel locations and diameters. Enlargement of the tunnels, despite not usually affecting primary reconstruction outcomes, plays an important role in revision ACL management. Three dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) models are reported to be the most accurate method for identifying the tunnel position and possible conflicts with a revision tunnel placement. However, the ability of 3D CT to measure the tunnel size is still not proven. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of measuring the size of the bone tunnels in ACL reconstructed knees with 3D CT compared to the traditional two dimensional (2D) CT method. Methods Twenty-four patients had CT scans performed immediately following ACL reconstruction surgery. Their femoral tunnels size were measured by a standard 2D CT measurement and then compared with three novel 3D CT measuring methods: the best transverse section method, the best fit cylinder method and the wall thickness method. The drill size used during surgery was used as a control measure for the tunnel width. Intra-class correlation coefficients were obtained. Results The intra-class correlation coefficient and respective 95% confidence interval range (ICC [95%CI]) for the three methods compared with the drill sizes were 0.899 [0.811-0.947] for the best transverse section method, 0.745 [0.553-0.862] for the best fit cylinder method, −0.004 [−0.081 to −0.12] for the wall thickness method and 0.922 [0.713-0.97] for the 2D CT method. The mean differences compared to the drill size were 0.02 mm for the best fit transverse section method, 0.01 mm for the best fit cylinder diameter method, 3.34 mm for the wall thickness method and 0.29 mm for the 2D CT method. The intra-rater agreement (ICC [95%CI]) was excellent for the best transverse section method 0.999 [0.998-0.999] and the 2D CT method 0.969 [0.941-0.984]. Conclusions The 3D best transverse section method presented a high correlation to the drill sizes and high intra-rater agreement, and was the best method for ACL tunnel evaluation in a 3D CT based model.

Najla Megherbi – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Geometrical approach for automatic detection of liquid surfaces in 3D Computed Tomography baggage imagery
    The Imaging Science Journal, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lounis Chermak, Toby P. Breckon, Greg T. Flitton, Najla Megherbi

    Abstract:

    This study presents a novel method for liquid detection within three-dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) baggage inspection imagery. Liquid detection within airport security is currently of significant interest due to security threats associated with liquid explosives. In this paper, we propose a robust technique based on the automatic identification of universal geometric properties of liquids within 3D space. The proposed approach is based on two stages of geometric fitting. First, we identify the 3D plane which fits to the horizontally oriented surface of the liquid recognising the universal self-levelling property of liquids in any given container. Second, we conduct two-dimensional shape analysis to highlight the shape of the liquid surface at a given level within the container using a least squares elliptical fitting approach. The proposed approach relies on the fact that occurrences of such perfectly aligned horizontal planes within a 3D CT security baggage scan are generally unlikely. Occurr…

  • Geometrical Approach for the Automatic Detection of Liquid Surfaces in 3D Computed Tomography Baggage Imagery
    Imaging Science Journal, 2015
    Co-Authors: Lounis Chermak, Toby P. Breckon, Greg T. Flitton, Najla Megherbi

    Abstract:

    © 2015 The Royal Photographic Society. This study presents a novel method for liquid detection within three-dimensional (3D) Computed Tomography (CT) baggage inspection imagery. Liquid detection within airport security is currently of significant interest due to security threats associated with liquid explosives. In this paper, we propose a robust technique based on the automatic identification of universal geometric properties of liquids within 3D space. The proposed approach is based on two stages of geometric fitting. First, we identify the 3D plane which fits to the horizontally oriented surface of the liquid recognising the universal self-levelling property of liquids in any given container. Second, we conduct two-dimensional shape analysis to highlight the shape of the liquid surface at a given level within the container using a least squares elliptical fitting approach. The proposed approach relies on the fact that occurrences of such perfectly aligned horizontal planes within a 3D CT security baggage scan are generally unlikely. Occurrences of such instance are thus indicative of liquid presence. Our results, over an extended set of complex test examples, confirm a liquid detection rate of 85-98% with a moderate processing time. Furthermore, as this proposed approach is based purely on the geometric properties of liquids and robust geometrical shape detection, this methodology is intrinsic to the 3D nature of the resulting CT data and not dependent on any exemplar training imagery.

  • IPTA – Fully automatic 3D Threat Image Projection: Application to densely cluttered 3D Computed Tomography baggage images
    2012 3rd International Conference on Image Processing Theory Tools and Applications (IPTA), 2012
    Co-Authors: Najla Megherbi, Toby P. Breckon, Greg T. Flitton, Andre Mouton

    Abstract:

    In this paper, we describe a Threat Image Projection (TIP) method designed for 3D Computed Tomography (CT) screening systems. The novel methodology automatically determines a valid 3D location in the passenger 3D CT baggage image into which a fictional threat 3D image can be inserted without violating the bag content. According to the scan orientation, the passenger bag content and the material of the inserted threat appropriate CT artefacts are generated using a Radon transform in order to make the insertion realistic. Densely cluttered 3D CT baggage images are used to validate our method. Experimental results confirm that our method is able to reliably insert threat items in challenging 3D images without providing any perceptible visual cue to human screeners.