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Abdominal Infection

The Experts below are selected from a list of 11181 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

John E. Mazuski – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aminoglycosides for intra-Abdominal Infection: equal to the challenge?
    Surgical Infections, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey A. Bailey, Katherine S. Virgo, Joseph T. Dipiro, Avery B. Nathens, Robert G. Sawyer, John E. Mazuski

    Abstract:

    Background: Aminoglycosides, combined with antianaerobic agents, have been used widely for the treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection. However, some prospective randomized controlled trials and other data suggested that aminoglycosides were less efficacious than newer comparators for the treatment of these Infections. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of all prospective randomized controlled trials utilizing aminoglycosides to reevaluate the efficacy of these agents for the treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection. Methods: Published English-language prospective randomized controlled trials comparing aminoglycosides with other agents for treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection were identified by MEDLINE search. For each study, data were collected regarding the number of patients enrolled and evaluated, their basic demographic characteristics, the sources of the intra-Abdominal Infections, the number of failures as determined by the study investigators, quality score, and the use of serum drug concentrat…

  • Clinical challenges and unmet needs in the management of complicated intra-Abdominal Infections.
    Surgical Infections, 2020
    Co-Authors: John E. Mazuski

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Background: Management of complicated intra-Abdominal Infections involves invasive procedures for control of the source of the Infection and antimicrobial therapy directed against gram-negative and anaerobic pathogens. Application of these management principles to the individual patient is essential to optimize the patient’s chances for recovery, while also avoiding unnecessary therapy that may have no clinical benefits, or that may carry risk. Methods: Based on a review of the literature, treatment guidelines, and expert opinion, the challenges of managing patients with complicated intra-Abdominal Infections are summarized using a patient stratification approach: “Lower risk” of treatment failure and death vs. “higher risk.” Results: Risk factors for treatment failure and death can be grouped into several categories, including the patient’s pre-existing medical comorbidities and physiological response to the Infection, the extent of the intra-Abdominal Infection, and the presence of specific pat…

  • the surgical Infection society revised guidelines on the management of intra Abdominal Infection
    Surgical Infections, 2017
    Co-Authors: John E. Mazuski, Robert G. Sawyer, Jeffrey M Tessier, Evan P Nadler, Matthew R Rosengart, Phillip K Chang, Patrick J Oneill, Kevin P Mollen, Jared M Huston, Jose J Diaz

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Previous evidence-based guidelines on the management of intra-Abdominal Infection (IAI) were published by the Surgical Infection Society (SIS) in 1992, 2002, and 2010. At the t…

Patchen E Dellinger – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • short course antimicrobial therapy does not increase treatment failure rate in patients with intra Abdominal Infection involving fungal organisms
    Surgical Infections, 2018
    Co-Authors: Nathan R Elwood, Joseph Cuschieri, Therese M Duane, Reza Askari, Charles H Cook, Patrick J Oneill, Lena M Napolitano, Nicholas Namias, Christopher A Guidry, Patchen E Dellinger

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Fungi frequently are isolated in intra-Abdominal Infections (IAI). The Study to Optimize Peritoneal Infection Therapy (STOP-IT) recently suggested short-course treatment for pa…

  • diagnosis and management of complicated intra Abdominal Infection in adults and children guidelines by the surgical Infection society and the infectious diseases society of america
    Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2010
    Co-Authors: Joseph S Solomkin, John E. Mazuski, Patrick J Oneill, John S Bradley, Keith A Rodvold, Ellie J C Goldstein, Ellen Jo Baron, Anthony W Chow, Patchen E Dellinger, Soumitra R Eachempati

    Abstract:

    Evidence-based guidelines for managing patients with intra-Abdominal Infection were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Surgical Infection Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace those previously published in 2002 and 2003. The guidelines are intended for treating patients who either have these Infections or may be at risk for them. New information, based on publications from the period 2003-2008, is incorporated into this guideline document. The panel has also added recommendations for managing intra-Abdominal Infection in children, particularly where such management differs from that of adults; for appendicitis in patients of all ages; and for necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates.

  • surgical Infection society intra Abdominal Infection study prospective evaluation of management techniques and outcome
    Archives of Surgery, 1993
    Co-Authors: Nicolas V Christou, Philip S. Barie, Patchen E Dellinger, Paul J Waymack, Harlan H Stone

    Abstract:

    • This prospective, open, consecutive, nonrandomized trial examined management techniques and outcome in severe peritonitis. A total of 239 patients with surgical Infection in the abdomen and an APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) II score greater than 10 were studied. Seventy-seven patients (32%) died. Reoperation had a 42% mortality rate (35 of 83 patients died) compared with a 27% mortality rate (42 of 156 died ) in patients who did not undergo reoperation. Forty-six patients underwent one reoperation; 15, two reoperations; 10, three reoperations; five, four reoperations; and seven, five reoperations, with mortality rates of 43%, 40%, 30%, 40%, and 57%, respectively. There was no significant difference in mortality between patients treated with a “closed-abdomen technique” (31% mortality) and those treated with variations of the “open-abdomen” technique (44% mortality). Logistic regression analysis showed that a high APACHE II score, low serum albumin level, and high New York Heart Association cardiac function status were significantly and independently associated with death. Low serum albumin level, youth, and high APACHE II score were significantly and independently associated with reoperation. ( Arch Surg . 1993;128:193-199)

Robert G. Sawyer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aminoglycosides for intra-Abdominal Infection: equal to the challenge?
    Surgical Infections, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey A. Bailey, Katherine S. Virgo, Joseph T. Dipiro, Avery B. Nathens, Robert G. Sawyer, John E. Mazuski

    Abstract:

    Background: Aminoglycosides, combined with antianaerobic agents, have been used widely for the treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection. However, some prospective randomized controlled trials and other data suggested that aminoglycosides were less efficacious than newer comparators for the treatment of these Infections. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of all prospective randomized controlled trials utilizing aminoglycosides to reevaluate the efficacy of these agents for the treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection. Methods: Published English-language prospective randomized controlled trials comparing aminoglycosides with other agents for treatment of intra-Abdominal Infection were identified by MEDLINE search. For each study, data were collected regarding the number of patients enrolled and evaluated, their basic demographic characteristics, the sources of the intra-Abdominal Infections, the number of failures as determined by the study investigators, quality score, and the use of serum drug concentrat…

  • age and its impact on outcomes with intra Abdominal Infection
    Surgical Infections, 2017
    Co-Authors: Robert G. Sawyer, Joseph Cuschieri, Jeffrey M Tessier, Drew Farmer, James M Sanders, Ori D. Rotstein, E P Dellinger, Pamela A Lipsett, Preston R Miller

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Age has been shown to play a significant role in the etiology of complicated intra-Abdominal Infections (cIAIs), but the correlation between age and outcomes after therapy was not investigated in the Study to Optimize Peritoneal Infection Therapy (STOP-IT) trial. Patients and Methods: Data were obtained by post hoc analysis of the STOP-IT trial database. Patients were stratified by age <65 or ≥65 years. Primary outcomes were surgical site Infection (SSI), recurrent IAI (recIAI), and death. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of outcomes. Results: There were 398 subjects <65 and 120 ≥ 65 years. Overall baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. The site of Infection was similar between groups except: Colon or rectum (48.3% vs. 29.9%, p = 0.0002) and biliary tree (16.7% vs. 9.1%, p = 0.02), which were more common in the older group, whereas small intestine (6.7% vs. 16.3%, p = 0.008) and appendix (4.2% vs.17.1%, p = 0.0004) were more com…

  • the surgical Infection society revised guidelines on the management of intra Abdominal Infection
    Surgical Infections, 2017
    Co-Authors: John E. Mazuski, Robert G. Sawyer, Jeffrey M Tessier, Evan P Nadler, Matthew R Rosengart, Phillip K Chang, Patrick J Oneill, Kevin P Mollen, Jared M Huston, Jose J Diaz

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Previous evidence-based guidelines on the management of intra-Abdominal Infection (IAI) were published by the Surgical Infection Society (SIS) in 1992, 2002, and 2010. At the t…