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Abdominal Wall Hernia

The Experts below are selected from a list of 6885 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

M. P. Simons – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery in The Netherlands: a national survey.
    Hernia, 2019
    Co-Authors: J. A. Wegdam, T. S. De Vries Reilingh, Simon W. Nienhuijs, M. P. Simons

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    In The Netherlands, the quality of Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery is largely unknown due to the lack of a Hernia registry. This study was designed to assess the current state of Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery in The Netherlands, to create a starting point for future evaluation of new quality measures.

  • Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery in The Netherlands: a national survey
    Hernia, 2019
    Co-Authors: J. A. Wegdam, T. S. De Vries Reilingh, Simon W. Nienhuijs, M. P. Simons

    Abstract:

    Purpose In The Netherlands, the quality of Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery is largely unknown due to the lack of a Hernia registry. This study was designed to assess the current state of Abdominal Wall Hernia surgery in The Netherlands, to create a starting point for future evaluation of new quality measures. Methods Dutch Hernia management indicators and recently proposed European Hernia Society (EHS) requirements for accredited/certified Hernia centers were used. The number of Dutch hospitals that meet the four main EHS requirements (on volume, experience, use of a registry and quality control) was assessed by analyzing governmental information and the results of a survey amongst all 1.554 Dutch general surgeons. Results The survey was representative with 426 respondents (27%) from all 75 hospitals. Fifty-one percent of the hospitals had a median inguinal repair volume of more than 290 (14–1.238) per year. An open or laparo-endoscopic inguinal repair technique was not related to hospital volume. Experienced Hernia surgeons, use of a registry and a structured quality control were reported to be present in, respectively, 97%, 39%, and 15% of the hospitals. Consensus in answers between the respondents per hospital was low (

  • systematic review and meta analysis of the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of wound infection after mesh repair of Abdominal Wall Hernia
    British Journal of Surgery, 2006
    Co-Authors: T J Aufenacker, M J W Koelemay, D J Gouma, M. P. Simons

    Abstract:

    Background:

    The aim was to determine whether systemic antibiotic prophylaxis prevented wound infection after repair of Abdominal Wall Hernia with mesh.

    Methods:

    This was a systematic review of the available literature identified from multiple databases using the terms ‘Hernia’ and ‘antibiotic prophylaxis’. Randomized placebo-controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in Abdominal Wall mesh Hernia repair with explicitly defined wound infection criteria and a minimum follow-up of 1 month were included. After independent quality assessment and data extraction, data were pooled for meta-analysis using a random-effects model.

    Results:

    The search process identified eight relevant trials. Two papers on umbilical, incisional or laparoscopic Hernias, and six concerning inguinal and femoral (groin) Hernias were suitable for meta-analysis. The incidence of infection after groin Hernia repair was 38 (3·0 per cent) of 1277 in the placebo group and 18 (1·5 per cent) of 1230 in the antibiotic group. Antibiotic prophylaxis did not significantly reduce the incidence of infection: odds ratio 0·54 (95 per cent confidence interval 0·24 to 1·21); number needed to treat was 74. The number of deep infections was six (0·6 per cent) in the placebo group and three (0·3 per cent) in the antibiotic prophylaxis group: odds ratio 0·50 (95 per cent c.i. 0·12 to 2·09).

    Conclusion:

    Antibiotic prophylaxis did not prevent the occurrence of wound infection after groin Hernia surgery. More trials are needed for complete evidence in other areas of Abdominal Wall Hernia. Copyright © 2005 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

P J Odwyer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • outcome of patients with chronic mesh infection following Abdominal Wall Hernia repair
    Hernia, 2014
    Co-Authors: L Chung, P J Odwyer

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Mesh infection following incisional Hernia repair has been reported at around 6–10 %. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of patients following treatment for chronically infected mesh after repair of an Abdominal Wall Hernia.

  • surgeon perspectives on options for ventral Abdominal Wall Hernia repair results of a postal questionnaire
    Hernia, 2005
    Co-Authors: P Witherspoon, P J Odwyer

    Abstract:

    Background: Ventral Abdominal Wall Hernias are a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Opinion varies as to appropriate management. A recent consensus meeting on incisional Hernia identified the need to standardise repair. On this background, a survey of current practice was performed. Method: A questionnaire was sent to 101 practicing general surgeons within the West of Scotland. Incisional, epigastric and para-umbilical defects were subdivided into defect size 5 cm. The surgeons were asked to indicate the most appropriate repair (suture, mayo or mesh) for each. The influence of reducibility on the decision to repair was also assessed. Results: Sixty-one of 101 questionnaires were returned valid giving a response rate of 60%. Suture repair was significantly more likely to be used in all defects 5 cm (P 5-cm, mesh was recommended for 90% of incisional Hernia compared with 81% of epigastric and 76% of para-umbilical Hernia (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in choice of repair for defect size 2–5 cm with opinion divided between suture and mesh. Irreducibility increased the likelihood of recommendation for repair. Conclusion: This survey shows a lack of consensus on the appropriate repair of ventral Abdominal Wall Hernia amonge practicing consultant general surgeons. This reflects the contrasting views within the current literature.

Lars N. Jorgensen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Colonic diverticulosis is associated with Abdominal Wall Hernia.
    Hernia, 2017
    Co-Authors: Lars N. Jorgensen, Søren Meisner, N. A. Henriksen

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Colonic diverticulosis and Abdominal Wall Hernia are common pathologies. Studies have suggested that connective tissue alterations play a role in the formation of both diverticulosis and Abdominal Wall Hernia. The aim of this cohort study was to evaluate the association between diverticulosis and Abdominal Wall Hernia in a large cohort of patients undergoing colonoscopy.

  • Abdominal Wall Hernia and pregnancy a systematic review
    Hernia, 2015
    Co-Authors: K. K. Jensen, Nadia A Henriksen, Lars N. Jorgensen

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for Abdominal Wall Hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of Abdominal Wall Hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy.

  • connective tissue alteration in Abdominal Wall Hernia
    British Journal of Surgery, 2011
    Co-Authors: Nadia A Henriksen, D H Yadete, Lars Tue Sorensen, Magnus S Agren, Lars N. Jorgensen

    Abstract:

    Background:

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of Abdominal Wall Hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of Hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in Abdominal Wall Hernia formation.

    Methods:

    A computer-assisted search of the medical databases PubMed and Embase was performed, together with a cross-reference search of eligible papers.

    Results:

    Fifty-two papers were included. Collagen alteration depended on the type of Hernia; there were more pronounced changes in patients with a direct inguinal Hernia than in those with an indirect inguinal Hernia, recurrent inguinal Hernia or incisional Hernia. A consistent finding was a significant increase in immature type III collagen relative to the stronger type I collagen in patients with a Hernia. This resulted in thinner collagen fibres with a correspondingly diminished biomechanical strength. It has been suggested that these alterations are due to variation in the synthesis, maturation or degradation of collagen by matrix metalloproteinases, in combination or alone.

    Conclusion:

    Hernia formation and recurrence is associated with altered collagen metabolism manifested by a decreased type I:III collagen ratio. Copyright © 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.