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Abiotic Depletion

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Matthias Finkbeiner – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abiotic resource Depletion in lca background and update of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential aadp model
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    The Depletion of Abiotic resources needs to be discussed in the light of available geologic stocks. For the evaluation of long-term resource availability under consideration of the resources’ functional relevance, the Abiotic resource stock that is ultimately available for human purposes needs to be identified. This paper discusses the determination of geologic resources stocks and outlines an approach for the estimation of the resource stocks ultimately available for human use in the long-term. Based on these numbers, existing characterization factors for the assessment of resource Depletion by means of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model can be updated.

  • Abiotic resource Depletion in LCA—background and update of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    The Depletion of Abiotic resources needs to be discussed in the light of available geologic stocks. For the evaluation of long-term resource availability under consideration of the resources’ functional relevance, the Abiotic resource stock that is ultimately available for human purposes needs to be identified. This paper discusses the determination of geologic resources stocks and outlines an approach for the estimation of the resource stocks ultimately available for human use in the long-term. Based on these numbers, existing characterization factors for the assessment of resource Depletion by means of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model can be updated.

  • the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential aadp as a new parameterisation to model the Depletion of Abiotic resources
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2011
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Raw material availability is a cause of concern for many industrial sectors. When addressing resource consumption in life cycle assessment (LCA), current characterisation models for Depletion of Abiotic resources provide characterisation factors based on (surplus) energy, exergy, or extraction–reserve ratios. However, all indicators presently available share a shortcoming as they neglect the fact that large amounts of raw materials can be stored in material cycles within the technosphere. These “anthropogenic stocks” represent a significant source and can change the material availability significantly. With new characterisation factors, resource consumption in LCA will be assessed by taking into account anthropogenic material stocks in addition to the lithospheric stocks. With these characterisation factors, the scarcity of resources should be reflected more realistically.

Laura Schneider – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abiotic resource Depletion in lca background and update of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential aadp model
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    The Depletion of Abiotic resources needs to be discussed in the light of available geologic stocks. For the evaluation of long-term resource availability under consideration of the resources’ functional relevance, the Abiotic resource stock that is ultimately available for human purposes needs to be identified. This paper discusses the determination of geologic resources stocks and outlines an approach for the estimation of the resource stocks ultimately available for human use in the long-term. Based on these numbers, existing characterization factors for the assessment of resource Depletion by means of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model can be updated.

  • Abiotic resource Depletion in LCA—background and update of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2015
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    The Depletion of Abiotic resources needs to be discussed in the light of available geologic stocks. For the evaluation of long-term resource availability under consideration of the resources’ functional relevance, the Abiotic resource stock that is ultimately available for human purposes needs to be identified. This paper discusses the determination of geologic resources stocks and outlines an approach for the estimation of the resource stocks ultimately available for human use in the long-term. Based on these numbers, existing characterization factors for the assessment of resource Depletion by means of the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential (AADP) model can be updated.

  • the anthropogenic stock extended Abiotic Depletion potential aadp as a new parameterisation to model the Depletion of Abiotic resources
    International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2011
    Co-Authors: Laura Schneider, Markus Berger, Matthias Finkbeiner

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    Raw material availability is a cause of concern for many industrial sectors. When addressing resource consumption in life cycle assessment (LCA), current characterisation models for Depletion of Abiotic resources provide characterisation factors based on (surplus) energy, exergy, or extraction–reserve ratios. However, all indicators presently available share a shortcoming as they neglect the fact that large amounts of raw materials can be stored in material cycles within the technosphere. These “anthropogenic stocks” represent a significant source and can change the material availability significantly. With new characterisation factors, resource consumption in LCA will be assessed by taking into account anthropogenic material stocks in addition to the lithospheric stocks. With these characterisation factors, the scarcity of resources should be reflected more realistically.

Rocca D'amaro – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The environmental performance of milk production on a typical Portuguese dairy farm
    Agricultural Systems, 2010
    Co-Authors: Erica Geraldes Castanheira, A. C. Dias, Luis Arroja, Rocca D'amaro

    Abstract:

    The activities associated with raw milk production on dairy farms require an effective evaluation of their environmental impact. The present study evaluates the global environmental impacts associated with milk production on dairy farms in Portugal and identifies the processes that have the greatest environmental impact by using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The main factors involved in milk production were included, namely: the dairy farm, maize silage, ryegrass silage, straw, concentrates, diesel and electricity. The results suggest that the major source of air and water emissions in the life cycle of milk is the production of concentrates. The activities carried out on dairy farms were the major source of nitrous oxides (from fuel combustion), ammonia, and methane (from manure management and enteric fermentation). Nevertheless, dairy farm activities, which include manure management, enteric fermentation and diesel consumption, make the greatest contributions to the categories of impact considered, with the exception of the Abiotic Depletion category, contributing to over 70% of the total global warming potential (1021.3 kg CO2 eq. per tonne of milk), 84% of the total photochemical oxidation potential (0.2 kg C2H4 eq. per tonne of milk), 70% of the total acidification potential (20.4 kg SO2 eq. per tonne of milk), and 41% of the total eutrophication potential (7.1 kg eq. per tonne of milk). The production of concentrates and maize silage are the major contributors to the Abiotic Depletion category, accounting for 35% and 28%, respectively, of the overall Abiotic Depletion potential (1.4 Sb eq. per tonne of milk). Based on this LCA case study, we recommend further work to evaluate some possible opportunities to improve the environmental performance of Portuguese milk production, namely: (i) implementing integrated solutions for manure recovery/treatment (e.g. anaerobic digestion) before its application to the soil as organic fertiliser during maize and ryegrass production; (ii) improving manure nutrient use efficiency in order to decrease the importation of nutrients; (iii) diversifying feeding crops, as the dependence on two annual forage crops is expected to lead to excessive soil mobilisation (and related impacts) and to insignificant carbon dioxide sequestration from the atmosphere; and (iv) changing the concentrate mixtures.

  • The environmental performance of milk production on a typical Portuguese dairy farm
    Agricultural Systems, 2010
    Co-Authors: Erica Geraldes Castanheira, A. C. Dias, Luis Arroja, Rocca D'amaro

    Abstract:

    The activities associated with raw milk production on dairy farms require an effective evaluation of their environmental impact. The present study evaluates the global environmental impacts associated with milk production on dairy farms in Portugal and identifies the processes that have the greatest environmental impact by using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The main factors involved in milk production were included, namely: the dairy farm, maize silage, ryegrass silage, straw, concentrates, diesel and electricity. The results suggest that the major source of air and water emissions in the life cycle of milk is the production of concentrates. The activities carried out on dairy farms were the major source of nitrous oxides (from fuel combustion), ammonia, and methane (from manure management and enteric fermentation). Nevertheless, dairy farm activities, which include manure management, enteric fermentation and diesel consumption, make the greatest contributions to the categories of impact considered, with the exception of the Abiotic Depletion category, contributing to over 70% of the total global warming potential (1021.3kg CO2 eq. per tonne of milk), 84% of the total photochemical oxidation potential (0.2kgC2H4eq.per tonne of milk), 70% of the total acidification potential (20.4kgSO2eq.per tonne of milk), and 41% of the total eutrophication potential (7.1kg PO43- eq. per tonne of milk). The production of concentrates and maize silage are the major contributors to the Abiotic Depletion category, accounting for 35% and 28%, respectively, of the overall Abiotic Depletion potential (1.4Sbeq. per tonne of milk). Based on this LCA case study, we recommend further work to evaluate some possible opportunities to improve the environmental performance of Portuguese milk production, namely: (i) implementing integrated solutions for manure recovery/treatment (e.g. anaerobic digestion) before its application to the soil as organic fertiliser during maize and ryegrass production; (ii) improving manure nutrient use efficiency in order to decrease the importation of nutrients; (iii) diversifying feeding crops, as the dependence on two annual forage crops is expected to lead to excessive soil mobilisation (and related impacts) and to insignificant carbon dioxide sequestration from the atmosphere; and (iv) changing the concentrate mixtures. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.