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Abortifacients

The Experts below are selected from a list of 246 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Eric R. Burrough – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Investigation of an emergent, tetracycline-resistant, abortifacient Campylobacter jejuni clone in a pregnant guinea pig model
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Eric R. Burrough

    Abstract:

    Objective—To compare pathogenicity of an emergent abortifacient Campylobacter jejuni (IA3902) with reference strains after oral inoculation in pregnant guinea pigs. Animals—58 pregnant guinea pigs. Procedures—Twelve animals were challenged IP with Campylobacter jejuni IA3902 along with 5 sham-inoculated controls to confirm abortifacient potential. Once pathogenicity was confirmed, challenge via oral inoculation was performed whereby 12

  • Pathogenicity of an emergent, ovine abortifacient Campylobacter jejuni clone orally inoculated into pregnant guinea pigs
    American Journal of Veterinary Research, 2009
    Co-Authors: Eric R. Burrough, Orhan Sahin, Paul J. Plummer, Qijing Zhang, Michael J. Yaeger

    Abstract:

    Objective—To compare pathogenicity of an emergent abortifacient Campylobacter jejuni (IA 3902) with that of reference strains after oral inoculation in pregnant guinea pigs. Animals—58 pregnant guinea pigs. Procedures—12 animals were challenged IP with C jejuni IA 3902 along with 5 sham-inoculated control animals to confirm abortifacient potential. Once pathogenicity was confirmed, challenge via oral inoculation was performed whereby 12 guinea pigs received IA 3902, 12 received C jejuni isolated from ovine feces (OF48), 12 received a fully sequenced human C jejuni isolate (NCTC 11168), and 5 were sham-inoculated control animals. After abortions, guinea pigs were euthanized; samples were collected for microbial culture, histologic examination, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results—C jejuni IA 3902 induced abortion in all 12 animals following IP inoculation and 6 of 10 animals challenged orally. All 3 isolates colonized the intestines after oral inoculation, but only IA 3902 induced abortion. Evidence o…

Kevin A Onyia – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abortifacient properties of alligator pepper ( Aframomum melegueta ) seeds
    Journal of Pharmacy & Bioresources, 2011
    Co-Authors: Ute Inegbenebor, Kemakolam Amadi, Maureen Ebomoyi, Kevin A Onyia

    Abstract:

    Alligator pepper ( Aframomum melegueta ) is used in the Surinam cuisine to flavour dishes such as vegetables (okra and tomatoes recipes), soups (lentil and chicken) and fish recipes. It has a wide use and the eating does not exclude pregnant women who actually use it to terminate unwanted pregnancy. A large percentage of maternal deaths in Nigeria is related to unsafe abortions. Abortifacient drugs are not generally available in the country which has restrictive abortion laws. To investigate possible abortifacient effect of Aframomum melegueta seeds, three groups of pregnant female Wistar albino rats were used. Group one, served as control, received no alligator pepper. Groups two and three were given aqueous extract of and the granulated alligator pepper respectively. Every group was fed normal rat chow while tap water was allowed ad libitum for the period of gestation. The results showed that the number and mean weight of litters were not significant between control and aqueous recipient groups suggesting that the extract had no deleterious effect on fertility. However group three that received granulated alligator pepper in doses above 4.0mg/kg body weight did not litter. While not advocating abortion the dose if worked out in humans could be utilized in fertility clinics, as a safe abortifacient if the mother’s life is seriously endangered by the pregnancy. Keywords: Abortifacient; Alligator pepper; Aframomum melegueta ; Seeds

C N Ekhator – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abortifacient Potentials of Zingiberaceae Aframomum Melegueta (Alligator Pepper) in Adult Female Wistar Rats
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: C N Ekhator, M. I. Ebomoyi

    Abstract:

    This study investigates the abortifacient potential of aqueous seed extract of Alligator pepper (zingiberaceae Aframomum Melegueta ) in pregnant rats. In a bid to achieve this objective, seven female rats were paired with seven male rats of proven fertility from an initial pilot study. After pregnancy was achieved, the males were removed and female rats 1 – 5 served as the experimental group while female rats 6 and 7 served as the control group. The experimental group receives 2ml/kg single dose of alligator pepper extracts intra-peritoneal at the 4 th day while the control was given 2ml/kg distill water orally. Thereafter, the weights of the animals were monitored for the next 17 days. The group fed aqueous seed extract of Alligator pepper showed weight loss in the 2 nd trimester (206.40±36.77g) compared to weight in the 1 st trimester (215.20±41.99g) but then gain weight again in the 3 rd trimester while the control had a progressive weight gain. At the end of pregnancy, while the control produced litters, the experimental rats did not produce any litter. The results of this study showed that aqueous seed extract of Alligator pepper is abortifacient and this was noted in the 2 nd trimester. There is therefore need to communicate the danger pregnant women are exposed to, when this substance is used as an ingredient in food or served during religious rites and cultural practices.

  • Abortifacient Efficacy of Moringa oleifera Leave: An Experimental Study on Adult Female Wistar Rats
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: C N Ekhator, U C Osifo

    Abstract:

    It is the aim of this study to investigate the abortifacient potential of Moringa oleifera leaves indicated by weight changes on pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. In a bid to achieved this objective, fifteen adult albino rats (5 males and 10 females) were obtained from the animal holding of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma. Female rats (M1 – M5) served as the experimental group while female rats (C1 and C5) served as the control group. Each rat in both groups was given 20g of normal rat chow and water ad libitum throughout the experiment. After the confirmation of pregnancy, 3g of M. oileifera was added to 17g of normal rat chow to form the experimental diet for M1 – M5 from the 5 th day to 15 th day. Our results showed progressive body weight gain in the control from the 6 th day to 21 st day. On the other hand, the test group (fed M. oleifera leaves) showed a reduction in body weight after mating to about the 7 th day and started gaining weight from the 8 th day to the end of the 3 rd trimester. At the end of the 23 rd day, only the control produces litters while the test did not produced any litter. This finding revealed that M. oleifera leaves may be abortifacient and it abortifacient potential occur in the 1 st trimester of pregnancy.