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Abscess Drainage

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Peter R Mueller – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • percutaneous hepatic Abscess Drainage do multiple Abscesses or multiloculated Abscesses preclude Drainage or affect outcome
    Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Debra A Gervais, Ronald S Arellano, Peter F Hahn, Raul N Uppot, Peter R Mueller

    Abstract:

    Purpose To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous Abscess Drainage in patients with pyogenic liver Abscesses of the following types: single, single multiloculated, multiple, and multiple multiloculated. Materials and Methods One hundred nine patients with 149 liver Abscesses who underwent percutaneous Drainage during an 11-year period were divided into a single Abscess group and a multiple Abscess group. Of the 109 patients, 54 had multiloculated Abscesses and were divided into single and multiple multiloculated Abscess groups. Technical success was defined as the ability to place the catheter within the Abscess cavity and clinical success was defined as improvement in the patient’s symptoms. Clinical findings, management strategy, complication rate, and success rate were analyzed. Results Technical success rates were 96% (82 of 85) for a single Abscess and 96% (23 of 24) for multiple Abscesses ( P = 1.0). Clinical success was achieved in 74 of 85 patients (87%) with a single Abscess and 22 of 24 patients (92%) with multiple Abscesses ( P = .729). Technical success rates were 94% (32 of 34) for a single multiloculated Abscess and 95% (19 of 20) for multiple multiloculated Abscesses ( P = 1.0). Clinical success was achieved in 30 of 34 patients (88%) with a single multiloculated Abscess and 18 of 20 patients (90%) with multiple multiloculated Abscesses ( P = 1). No significant difference in hospital stay was seen between single and multiple Abscess groups ( P = .373) or between single multiloculated and multiple multiloculated Abscess groups ( P = .180). There were no major complications or mortality related to the procedure. Conclusions Percutaneous Drainage is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of pyogenic liver Abscess, regardless of Abscess complexity and/or multiplicity.

  • percutaneous imaging guided abdominal and pelvic Abscess Drainage in children
    Radiographics, 2004
    Co-Authors: Debra A Gervais, Mukesh G Harisinghani, Stephen D Brown, Susan A Connolly, Sherry L Brec, Peter R Mueller

    Abstract:

    Percutaneous imaging-guided Drainage is the first-line treatment for infected or symptomatic fluid collections in the abdomen and pelvis, in the absence of indications for immediate surgery. The technology and expertise needed to perform percutaneous Abscess Drainage are widely available and readily adapted for use in the pediatric population. Catheter insertion procedures include the trocar and Seldinger techniques. Imaging guidance for Drainage is most commonly performed with ultrasonography (US), computed tomography, or US and fluoroscopy combined. Abscesses in locations that are difficult to access, such as those deep in the pelvis, subphrenic regions, or epigastric region, can be drained by using the appropriate approach—transrectal, transgluteal, intercostal, or transhepatic. Although the causes of Abscesses in children differ slightly from those of Abscesses in the adult population, the frequency of successful treatment with percutaneous Abscess Drainage in children is 85%–90%, similar to that in a…

  • recurrent abdominal and pelvic Abscesses incidence results of repeated percutaneous Drainage and underlying causes in 956 Drainages
    American Journal of Roentgenology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Debra A Gervais, Ronald S Arellano, Peter F Hahn, Mary Jane Oneill, Chihi Ho, Peter R Mueller

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE. We undertook this study to determine the incidence and results of repeated (secondary) percutaneous Abscess Drainage performed on recurrent Abscesses after successful initial (primary) percutaneous Abscess Drainage.MATERIALS AND METHODS. Imaging studies from patients who underwent multiple Drainages were reviewed to define a cohort of patients who underwent secondary percutaneous Abscess Drainage after successful initial percutaneous Abscess Drainage of the same Abscess. Medical records of these patients were then reviewed to assess the results of secondary percutaneous Abscess Drainage.RESULTS. Forty-five Abscesses in 43 patients required secondary percutaneous Abscess Drainage. Twenty-four of the 43 patients avoided surgery. Secondary percutaneous Abscess Drainage was successful in evacuating the Abscess cavity in 39 (91%) of 43 patients. Duration of Drainage and time until recurrence were not significant predictors for avoiding surgery. Mean duration of secondary percutaneous Abscess drainag…

Debra A Gervais – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Percutaneous Biopsy and Abscess Drainage in the Abdomen and Pelvis
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Connor A. Morton, Debra A Gervais, Justin J. Campbell, Sudhen B. Desai, Albert A. Nemcek, Robert J. Lewandowski

    Abstract:

    Abstract The expansion in the use of image-guided percutaneous biopsy and abdominopelvic Abscess Drainage reflects the ability of these procedures to offer safe minimally invasive techniques with superior outcomes compared with previously utilized operative approaches. Advances in technique, instruments, and imaging modalities have made these procedures among the most commonly performed in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Increasing demands from patients, referring physicians, and hospitals to offer and excel in these procedures highlight their importance.

  • role of percutaneous Abscess Drainage in the management of young patients with crohn disease
    Pediatric Radiology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Brian S Pugmire, Peter F Hahn, Jess L Kaplan, Daniel P Doody, Harland S Winter, Debra A Gervais

    Abstract:

    Background
    Intra-abdominal Abscess is a common complication of Crohn disease in children. Prior studies, primarily in adults, have shown that percutaneous Abscess Drainage is a safe and effective treatment for this condition; however, the data regarding this procedure and indications in pediatric patients is limited.

  • percutaneous Abscess Drainage
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Siddharth Govindan, Sandeep Hedgire, Mukesh G Harisinghani, Debra A Gervais

    Abstract:

    Image-guided percutaneous Abscess Drainage (PAD) incorporates patient and imaging pre-assessment, access planning, catheter placement, Drainage maintenance, patient and imaging follow-up, and, finally, catheter removal. When performed after appropriate patient and imaging pre-assessment, with planning, follow-up, and coordination with referring services, surgeons, and gastroenterologists, PAD is the cornerstone of treatment of the patient with an infected collection.

Shyam Varadarajulu – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • endoscopic ultrasound guided pelvic Abscess Drainage with video
    Journal of Hepato-biliary-pancreatic Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Bronte A Holt, Shyam Varadarajulu

    Abstract:

    Pelvic Abscesses present a serious and challeng- ing management problem. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)- guided Drainage provides a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment option. The likelihood of a successful outcome is dependent on appropriate patient selection, Drainage technique and postoperative management. This review outlines the evidence behind and procedural steps required for EUS-guided pelvic Abscess Drainage.

  • Endoscopic ultrasound‐guided pelvic Abscess Drainage (with video)
    Journal of Hepato-biliary-pancreatic Sciences, 2014
    Co-Authors: Bronte A Holt, Shyam Varadarajulu

    Abstract:

    Pelvic Abscesses present a serious and challeng- ing management problem. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)- guided Drainage provides a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment option. The likelihood of a successful outcome is dependent on appropriate patient selection, Drainage technique and postoperative management. This review outlines the evidence behind and procedural steps required for EUS-guided pelvic Abscess Drainage.

  • endoscopic ultrasound guided Abscess Drainage
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America, 2012
    Co-Authors: Ganapathy A Prasad, Shyam Varadarajulu

    Abstract:

    : Abdominal and pelvic Abscesses have traditionally been drained by percutaneous techniques or surgery. While surgical Drainage is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, percutaneous techniques are associated with the need for multiple interventions, increased length of hospital stay, and an indwelling external catheter for prolonged periods. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a minimally invasive but highly effective technique that enables internal Drainage of the Abscess. Although data are limited, evidence supporting its clinical efficacy is increasing rapidly. This article summarizes the current status of EUS-guided approach for Drainage of gastrointestinal Abscess collections.