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Academic Intervention

The Experts below are selected from a list of 210 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Chris Visscher – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Follow-Up Study Investigating the Effects of a Physically Active Academic Intervention
    Early Childhood Education Journal, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marijke J. Mullender-wijnsma, Esther Hartman, Johannes W. De Greeff, Simone Doolaard, Roel Bosker, Chris Visscher

    Abstract:

    In previous studies, the effects of physically active Academic lessons on Academic achievement have been shown. Less is known about follow-up effects and the effects for disadvantaged groups. The first aim of this study was to examine 7–9 months follow-up effects of a physically active Academic Intervention on Academic achievement. The second aim was to examine the effects of the 2-year Intervention for a subgroup of socially disadvantaged children. A cluster-randomized controlled trial with 499 children (113 socially disadvantaged children) from second- and third-grade classes was conducted. Children’s Academic achievement was measured before the Intervention started, after the first and second Intervention year, and 7–9 months after the Intervention ended. At the 7–9 months follow-up, the Intervention group showed significantly greater gains in math performance in comparison with the control group. No significant follow-up effects were found on language performance. Furthermore, the lessons significantly improved the math and spelling performance of socially disadvantaged children after two Intervention years. These children did not benefit more from the lessons than other children. In conclusion, effects of physically active Academic lessons on math achievement persist when the lessons are no longer taught, and the lessons are an innovative way to improve the Academic achievement of socially disadvantaged children. The findings suggest that physically active Academic lessons should be considered for inclusion in school curriculums in order to improve the Academic achievement of all children. Trial Registration: This study is registered at www.isrctn.com
    (No. ISRCTN17021806).

  • physically active math and language lessons improve Academic achievement a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Pediatrics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Marijke J Mullenderwijnsma, Esther Hartman, Johannes W. De Greeff, Simone Doolaard, Roel Bosker, Chris Visscher

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: Using physical activity in the teaching of Academic lessons is a new way of learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an innovative physically active Academic Intervention (“Fit & Vaardig op School” [FV effect size [ES] 0.51), general mathematics (P < .001; ES 0.42), and spelling (P < .001; ES 0.45) scores. This equates to 4 months more learning gains in comparison with the control group. No differences were found on the reading test. CONCLUSIONS: Physically active Academic lessons significantly improved mathematics and spelling performance of elementary school children and are therefore a promising new way of teaching.

Edward J. Daly – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Chapter 15 – Academic Intervention
    Toolkit for Working with Juvenile Sex Offenders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Edward J. Daly, Maureen A. O’connor, Polly M. Daro, Whitney Strong, Mackenzie S. Sommerhalder

    Abstract:

    Poor Academic achievement is common among juvenile sex offenders (JSOs), who display significant deficits in basic skill areas relative to their non-delinquent peers, making it very difficult to foster positive attachments to school. This chapter describes a functional approach to Academic Intervention, one which emphasizes increasing Academic engagement and identifying functional reasons for Academic skills deficits as a basis for choosing Interventions. A model of assessment and Intervention is presented as a multistep sequence for the selection and delivery of instructional and motivational Interventions. The model encompasses various assessment strategies (establishing repeated measures of target behaviors, identifying potential reinforcers, and determining whether the problem is a skill or a performance deficit), and Intervention strategies that are both empirically supported and can be derived from the assessment results.

  • Functional Assessment of the Academic Environment 30+ Years Later
    Contemporary School Psychology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Edward J. Daly, Natalie Hoff, Elisabeth J. Kane, Jaynie Hawkins, Alicia M. Kruger, Nicole Bricko, Allison Heifner, Lauren Scanlan

    Abstract:

    The current paper examines the progress that has been made in the area of Academic assessment and Intervention since Lentz and Shapiro’s (1986) seminal work over 30 years ago that opened the door to school psychologists helping teachers with developing and evaluating Academic Interventions through consultation. Lentz and Shapiro’s model has stood the test of time and spawned considerable research that has resulted in useful assessment and Intervention technologies that school psychologists can incorporate in their practice today. The model and recent technological innovations and how to use them in school-based consultation are discussed and illustrated through a case example. Recommendations are made for both practice and future research in refining analysis and Academic Intervention within a consultation framework.

  • Functional Assessment of the Academic Environment 30+ Years Later.
    Contemporary School Psychology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Edward J. Daly, Natalie Hoff, Elisabeth J. Kane, Jaynie Hawkins, Alicia M. Kruger, Nicole Bricko, Allison Heifner, Lauren Scanlan

    Abstract:

    The current paper examines the progress that has been made in the area of Academic assessment and Intervention since Lentz and Shapiro’s (1986) seminal work over 30 years ago that opened the door to school psychologists helping teachers with developing and evaluating Academic Interventions through consultation. Lentz and Shapiro’s model has stood the test of time and spawned considerable research that has resulted in useful assessment and Intervention technologies that school psychologists can incorporate in their practice today. The model and recent technological innovations and how to use them in school-based consultation are discussed and illustrated through a case example. Recommendations are made for both practice and future research in refining analysis and Academic Intervention within a consultation framework.

Christopher H. Skinner – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Assessing the Relative Effects of Interventions in Students with Mild Disabilities: Assessing Instructional Time:
    Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2002
    Co-Authors: Christopher H. Skinner, Phillip J. Belfiore, T. Steuart Watson

    Abstract:

    Assessment data are used to make treatment recommendations for students with mild disabilities. However, no assessment procedures exist that allow one to predict with certainty that one Academic Intervention will be more effective than another Academic Intervention for a particular student with mild disabilities. Therefore, hypotheses regarding Intervention effectiveness should be tested by assessing students’ learning rates under different instructional procedures. In this demonstration, alternating treatment designs are used to show how more precise measurement of instructional time can impact the assessment of relative learning rates when students are exposed to more than one Intervention. Discussion centers around the importance of time as a contextual variable when assessing the effects of Academic Interventions.

  • Enhancing science performance in students with learning disabilities using cover, copy, and compare: A student shows the way
    Psychology in the Schools, 2002
    Co-Authors: Tawnya J. Smith, Karen I. Dittmer, Christopher H. Skinner

    Abstract:

    A student who participated in a previous study where he was trained to use a self-managed Academic Intervention known as cover, copy, and compare (CCC) to enhance his mathematics performance developed the specific Intervention used in the current study. Without prompting, this student adapted and employed this procedure to learn bone in the human body. In the current study a multiple baseline across tasks design was used to determine if CCC could be used to enhance accuracy in identifying parts of the human heart in three students with learning disabilities. Three students learned how to perform the self-management procedures during one session that lasted less than 15 minutes. Results showed that immediately after implementing the CCC Intervention students’ accuracy improved. Following 11 brief sessions, students were able to identify 15 parts of a human heart with an overall accuracy of 80% over 2 consecutive days. Discussion focuses on limitations and implications of this study and school psychologists’ and students’ contributions to the development and empirical validation of Academic Interventions. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • Cover, Copy, and Compare: A Self-Managed Academic Intervention Effective Across Skills, Students, and Settings
    Journal of Behavioral Education, 1997
    Co-Authors: Christopher H. Skinner, T. F. Mclaughlin, Pat Logan

    Abstract:

    Cover, Copy, and Compare (CCC) is a simple, efficient, self-managed Academic Intervention that can be used to improve accuracy, fluency, and maintenance across students, curricula objectives, Academic skill domains, and settings. In it’s simplest form CCC requires students to look at an Academic stimulus (e.g., for spelling the stimulus would be a written a word) cover the stimulus, respond by copying the stimulus (e.g., writing the word), and evaluate the responses by comparing it to the original stimulus. The CCC procedure and research that supports the generalizability and ecological validity of this procedure is described and analyzed. Following this analysis, recommendations for implementing Cover, Copy, and Compare in educational settings are provided.