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Alternating Treatments Design

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Toby Honsberger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparison of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the clerical skills of adolescents with Autism
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kyle D. Bennett, Anibal Gutierrez, Toby Honsberger
    Abstract:

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the acquisition of clerical skills among five secondary students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We used an adapted Alternating Treatments Design consisting of baseline, comparison, and best treatment conditions. Results showed there were negligible differences between video prompting with or without voice-over narration. However, participants indicated differing preferences for one method over the other.

Hannah Macnaul – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of Assignment Choice on Student Academic Performance in an Online Class
    Behavior Analysis in Practice, 2021
    Co-Authors: Hannah Macnaul, Catia Cividini-motta, Rachel Garcia, Ian Thacker
    Abstract:

    Choice of assignment has been shown to increase student engagement, improve academic outcomes, and promote student satisfaction in higher education courses (Hanewicz, Platt, & Arendt, Distance Education , 38 (3), 273–287, 2017 ). However, in previous research, choice resulted in complex procedures and increased response effort for instructors (e.g., Arendt, Trego, & Allred, Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education , 8 (1), 2–17, 2016 ). Using simplified procedures, the current study employed a repeated-measures with an AlternatingTreatments Design to evaluate the effects of assignment choice (flash cards, study guide) on the academic outcomes of 42 graduate students in an online, asynchronous course. Slight differences between conditions were observed, but differences were not statistically significant.

  • A Comparison of High-Tech and Low-Tech Response Modalities to Improve Student Classroom Behavior
    Journal of Behavioral Education, 2020
    Co-Authors: Thomas Schulz, Catia Cividini-motta, Kwang-sun Cho Blair, Hannah Macnaul
    Abstract:

    This study compared the effects of high-tech (clickers) and low-tech (response cards and hand raising) active student responding modalities on student classroom behavior during whole-group English language arts instruction in two 1st-grade classrooms serving students with and without disabilities. The authors combined an ABAB reversal Design with an Alternating Treatments Design to compare the impact of using high-tech and low-tech modalities on academic responding, disruptive behavior, and accuracy of responding across four teacher-nominated students in two classrooms. The results of the study indicate that both clickers and response cards were equally effective in increasing student academic responding and decreasing disruptive behavior. Additionally, accuracy of responding was similar during the response cards and clickers conditions for all participants.

Kyle D. Bennett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparison of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the clerical skills of adolescents with Autism
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kyle D. Bennett, Anibal Gutierrez, Toby Honsberger
    Abstract:

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the acquisition of clerical skills among five secondary students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We used an adapted Alternating Treatments Design consisting of baseline, comparison, and best treatment conditions. Results showed there were negligible differences between video prompting with or without voice-over narration. However, participants indicated differing preferences for one method over the other.

Stacey Emmert – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The effects of fine motor movement and tactile stimulation on the math problem solving of students with attention problems
    Journal of Behavioral Education, 2007
    Co-Authors: Suneeta Kercood, Janice A. Grskovic, David L. Lee, Stacey Emmert
    Abstract:

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of fine motor physical activity with tactile stimulation during two conditions of math problem solving, visual and auditory. Eight 4th and 5th grade students with attention problems participated. Using an Alternating Treatments Design, students solved as many math story problems as they could, presented on worksheets or verbally during two conditions, with and without tactile stimulation during 20 min. Motor behavior, recorded from videotape, and number of correctly completed word problems were measured. Results suggest that fine motor manipulation of a tactile stimulation object reduced excessive motor movement and increased task completion of students with attention problems.

Anibal Gutierrez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A comparison of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the clerical skills of adolescents with Autism
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2013
    Co-Authors: Kyle D. Bennett, Anibal Gutierrez, Toby Honsberger
    Abstract:

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of video prompting with and without voice-over narration on the acquisition of clerical skills among five secondary students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We used an adapted Alternating Treatments Design consisting of baseline, comparison, and best treatment conditions. Results showed there were negligible differences between video prompting with or without voice-over narration. However, participants indicated differing preferences for one method over the other.