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David Gee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • SLS/BIALL Academic Law Library Survey 2017/2018
    Legal Information Management, 2019
    Co-Authors: David Gee
    Abstract:

    Survey report outlining the activities and funding of Academic Law libraries in the UK and Ireland in the Academic year 2017/2018. The figures have been taken from the results of a survey questionnaire undertaken by Academic Services staff at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on behalf of the Society of Legal Scholars (SLS). The report is based on returns from 93 university and college libraries in the UK and Ireland (institutions offering either undergraduate, postgraduate or vocational courses) who responded to the survey conducted in March 2019. It is the only survey of its kind and provides data which Academic Law library managers use to bench-mark their own services and Law course validation bodies note when appraising the provision of institutions seeking to run Law courses. The report includes a summary of key findings, a compilation of the statistics, conclusions drawn from the figures and illustrative diagrams.

  • sls biall Academic Law library survey 2016 2017
    Legal Information Management, 2018
    Co-Authors: David Gee
    Abstract:

    Survey report outlining the activities and funding of Academic Law libraries in the UK and Ireland in the Academic year 2016/2017. The figures have been taken from the results of a survey questionnaire undertaken by Academic Services staff at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on behalf of the Society of Legal Scholars (SLS). The report is based on returns from 90 university and college libraries in the UK and Ireland (institutions offering either undergraduate, postgraduate or vocational courses) who responded to the survey conducted in March 2018. It is the only survey of its kind and provides data which Academic Law library managers use to bench-mark their own services and Law course validation bodies note when appraising the provision of institutions seeking to run Law courses. The report includes a summary of key findings, a compilation of the statistics, conclusions drawn from the figures and illustrative diagrams.

  • sls biall Academic Law library survey 2015 2016
    Legal Information Management, 2017
    Co-Authors: David Gee
    Abstract:

    Survey report outlining the activities and funding of Academic Law libraries in the UK and Ireland in the Academic year 2015/2016. The figures have been taken from the results of a survey questionnaire undertaken by Academic Services staff at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on behalf of the Society of Legal Scholars (SLS). The report is based on returns from 97 university and college libraries in the UK and Ireland (institutions offering either undergraduate, postgraduate or vocational courses) who responded to the survey conducted in March 2017. It is the only survey of its kind and provides data which Academic Law library managers use to bench-mark their own services and Law course validation bodies note when appraising the provision of institutions seeking to run Law courses. The report includes a summary of key findings, a compilation of the statistics, conclusions drawn from the figures and illustrative diagrams.

Peter Clinch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Kwanghyuk David Yoo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Sarah Reis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • are you a member of the Law school community access policies at Academic Law libraries and access to justice
    Law Library Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Sarah Reis
    Abstract:

    Law libraries play a crucial role in facilitating access to legal materials, which is a necessary prerequisite to achieving access to justice. However, many Academic Law libraries, particularly at private Law schools, are closed to members of the general public. This paper explores the access policies at Law libraries at the top 25 Law schools and in the three largest metropolitan areas to investigate whether members of the general public who live in these areas have adequate access to legal materials. This paper also includes a case study of the Seattle area to offer insight into how members of the general public in Seattle can obtain access to legal materials. This paper proposes introducing legal research clinics and restructuring advanced legal research courses at both public and private Law schools to help address unmet legal needs and to provide students with public service opportunities. The success of both proposals hinges on the willingness of Law librarians to oversee the legal research clinics and to teach the advanced legal research classes. Both proposals will help Law schools comply with ABA Standards 303 and 304, which go into effect beginning with the 2016-17 Academic year. Implementation of these proposals will also improve the image and reputation of Law schools and the legal profession, better equip Law students with necessary legal research and writing skills before they graduate, and reduce the amount of unmet legal needs in communities.

  • are you a member of the Law school community access policies at Academic Law libraries and access to justice
    Law Library Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Sarah Reis
    Abstract:

    This article explores access policies at Academic Law libraries and offers two proposals intended to help Law schools comply with ABA Standards 303 and 304, improve the image of Law schools and the legal profession, better equip Law students with legal research skills, and address unmet legal needs in communities.

Sharon K. Scott – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Status and Tenure for Academic Law Librarians: A Survey
    Law Library Journal, 2004
    Co-Authors: Sharon Blackburn, Masako Patrum, Sharon K. Scott
    Abstract:

    The authors developed, distributed, and compiled a survey instrument in 2001 focusing on status and tenure for Academic Law librarians who are not directors. They describe the results of the survey with the goal of helping nondirector Law librarians make their best argument toward obtaining status and tenure.

  • Status and Tenure for Academic Law Librarians: A Survey
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Sharon Blackburn, Masako Patrum, Sharon K. Scott
    Abstract:

    The debate surrounding the issue of faculty and Academic status for librarians has captured the attention of contributors to library literature for many years. This ongoing concern eventually led to collective action: in 1959, a report of the University Libraries Section of the Academic Status Committee of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) “strongly recommended” professional librarians be granted Academic status and privileges. Opinion pieces have since abounded, with some convinced that the perceived benefits attached to “faculty status” are the due of the librarian, while others are just as strongly convinced that “status” too often comes with added responsibilities and few rewards. In June 2001, the ACRL board reaffirmed a statement supporting the granting of faculty status for librarians. The 2001 ACRL statement reinforces the view that faculty status for librarians is a double-edged sword. If this statement is applied by universities or Law schools, librarians will find themselves being evaluated alongside their teaching faculty colleagues. Full-time jobs and lack of release time and funding for research activities put librarians at a disadvantage when being evaluated in a large faculty pool, and they may find themselves trying to satisfy two sets of criteria: those relating to their primary job performance as librarians and those needed to meet “faculty” standards. The Law librarians at Texas Tech School of Law Library do not now have faculty or other professional status. In considering whether to seek such status, some discussion among the librarians ensued as to whether they would benefit. In order to make a determination regarding this question, a nationwide survey was conducted to assess the current state of Law librarian status and tenure, with results which may have considerable value to universities and colleges considering granting faculty status to their librarians.