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Academic Quality

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David D. Dill – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Public Policy for Academic Quality – Public Policy for Academic Quality : Analyses of Innovative Policy Instruments
    Higher Education Dynamics, 2020
    Co-Authors: David D. Dill, Maarja Beerkens

    Abstract:

    This volume summarizes a significant body of research systematically analyzing innovative external Quality assurance policies in higher education around the world. It will be essential reading for policy makers, administrators and researchers alike. Over the last decade the structure of higher education in most countries has undergone significant change. This change, brought about by social demands for expanded access, technological developments, and market forces, has seen the traditional concerns with access and cost supplemented by a fresh concern with Academic Quality. As a result new public policies on Academic Quality assurance have rapidly emerged and migrated around the globe. However, the public debate about new Academic Quality assurance policies, both within and across countries, has not always been informed by reliable analyses of the strengths and weaknesses of these innovative instruments. It is this gap that the current edited volume seeks to fill. It is based on the work of the Public Policy for Academic Quality research program (PPAQ), which was designed to provide systematic analyses of innovative external Quality assurance policies around the world. This volume, informed by key international scholars, presents the fourteen analyses conducted as part of the PPAQ research program. Each analysis examines the policy goals, implementation problems, and impacts of these newly developed national Quality assurance instruments. The book concludes with an assessment of the lessons learned from these collected policy analyses and outlines the framework conditions that appear essential for assuring Academic standards in the university sector.

  • The ‘Catch 22’ of Academic Quality: Implications for Universities and Public Policy ∗
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: David D. Dill

    Abstract:

    Over the last decade a new issue arose on the higher education policy agenda of most countries throughout the world. The traditional higher education policy issues of access and cost have been supplemented by a new concern with Academic Quality. First initiated in France in the early 1980s and more fully elaborated in the UK by the Thatcher government in the late 1980s, new forms of national Quality regulation – more usually termed “Quality assurance” – have spread rapidly around the world. One indirect measure of the diffusion of these new public policies is the development of an international association of public and independent entities engaged in Academic Quality assurance — The International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education (INQAAHE). In 1990 when it was first created INQAAHE had 25 members in 17 nations, primarily represented by the “Westminster” countries. By 2001 when the INQAAHE held its Sixth International Conference in Bangalore, India, it had attracted 300 participants from some 46 countries and regions. As policy makers in most countries have debated issues regarding the regulation of Academic Quality there has often been extensive dispute about the meaning of the term. Many have suggested that “Academic Quality” is amorphous, non-measurable, or so ambiguous in meaning as to be not appropriate for public regulation. I would argue that Academic Quality is a fundamental and necessary concept in higher education and one without which our predominant concern with cost and access becomes increasingly futile. In the discussion to follow I will define Academic Quality as equivalent to Academic standards, that is the level of Academic achievement attained by higher education graduates. This definition of Academic Quality as Academic standards is consistent with the emerging focus in higher education on student learning outcomes — the specific levels of

  • The Regulation of Academic Quality: An Assessment of University Evaluation Systems with Emphasis on the United States *
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Abernethy Hall, David D. Dill

    Abstract:

    During the 1990s a new issue arose on the higher education policy agenda of most countries throughout the world. The traditional policy issues of access and cost have been supplemented by a new concern with Academic Quality. First initiated in France in the early 1980s and more fully elaborated in the UK by the Thatcher government in the late 1980s, new forms of university evaluation – often termed “Academic Quality assurance” – have spread rapidly around the world. By the new millennium almost all of the countries in the European Union as well as many counties in Africa, Asia, and South America and a number of the US states were experimenting with new forms of Academic Quality regulation. This discussion of Academic Quality regulation is organized as follows: (2) an overview of higher education systems, (3) relevant social changes affecting higher education, (4) an overview of higher education reforms, (5) an overview of university evaluation systems, and (6) an assessment of university evaluation systems. In a concluding section (7) I offer some summary personal observations on the development of university evaluation systems. Throughout I make specific reference to the US system, but also discuss other nations. This is particularly necessary because while the US is generally regarded as having the strongest

Maarja Beerkens – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Public Policy for Academic Quality – Public Policy for Academic Quality : Analyses of Innovative Policy Instruments
    Higher Education Dynamics, 2020
    Co-Authors: David D. Dill, Maarja Beerkens

    Abstract:

    This volume summarizes a significant body of research systematically analyzing innovative external Quality assurance policies in higher education around the world. It will be essential reading for policy makers, administrators and researchers alike. Over the last decade the structure of higher education in most countries has undergone significant change. This change, brought about by social demands for expanded access, technological developments, and market forces, has seen the traditional concerns with access and cost supplemented by a fresh concern with Academic Quality. As a result new public policies on Academic Quality assurance have rapidly emerged and migrated around the globe. However, the public debate about new Academic Quality assurance policies, both within and across countries, has not always been informed by reliable analyses of the strengths and weaknesses of these innovative instruments. It is this gap that the current edited volume seeks to fill. It is based on the work of the Public Policy for Academic Quality research program (PPAQ), which was designed to provide systematic analyses of innovative external Quality assurance policies around the world. This volume, informed by key international scholars, presents the fourteen analyses conducted as part of the PPAQ research program. Each analysis examines the policy goals, implementation problems, and impacts of these newly developed national Quality assurance instruments. The book concludes with an assessment of the lessons learned from these collected policy analyses and outlines the framework conditions that appear essential for assuring Academic standards in the university sector.

  • designing the framework conditions for assuring Academic standards lessons learned about professional market and government regulation of Academic Quality
    Higher Education, 2013
    Co-Authors: David D. Dill, Maarja Beerkens

    Abstract:

    The new demands of mass systems of higher education and the emerging environment of global Academic competition are altering the traditional institutions for assuring Academic standards in universities. As a consequence many nations are experimenting with new instruments for Academic Quality assurance. Contemporary government control of Academic Quality assumes three primary forms: “oversight” or direct regulation; “competition” or steering of market forces; and “mutuality” or professional self-regulation structured by the state. The challenge confronting all nations is to design a policy framework that effectively balances the forces of the state, the market, and the Academic profession to assure Academic standards in universities. Based upon the strengths and weaknesses observed in 14 policy analyses of innovative national instruments of professional self-regulation, market-based regulation, and direct state regulation for assuring Academic Quality in universities, we outline the essential components of a national framework for assuring Academic standards.

  • public policy for Academic Quality analyses of innovative policy instruments
    Higher Education Dynamics, 2010
    Co-Authors: David D. Dill, Maarja Beerkens

    Abstract:

    This volume summarizes a significant body of research systematically analyzing innovative external Quality assurance policies in higher education around the world. It will be essential reading for policy makers, administrators and researchers alike. Over the last decade the structure of higher education in most countries has undergone significant change. This change, brought about by social demands for expanded access, technological developments, and market forces, has seen the traditional concerns with access and cost supplemented by a fresh concern with Academic Quality. As a result new public policies on Academic Quality assurance have rapidly emerged and migrated around the globe. However, the public debate about new Academic Quality assurance policies, both within and across countries, has not always been informed by reliable analyses of the strengths and weaknesses of these innovative instruments. It is this gap that the current edited volume seeks to fill. It is based on the work of the Public Policy for Academic Quality research program (PPAQ), which was designed to provide systematic analyses of innovative external Quality assurance policies around the world. This volume, informed by key international scholars, presents the fourteen analyses conducted as part of the PPAQ research program. Each analysis examines the policy goals, implementation problems, and impacts of these newly developed national Quality assurance instruments. The book concludes with an assessment of the lessons learned from these collected policy analyses and outlines the framework conditions that appear essential for assuring Academic standards in the university sector.

Soren Barlebo Rasmussen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the shift in Academic Quality control
    Science Technology & Human Values, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sven Hemlin, Soren Barlebo Rasmussen

    Abstract:

    Quality control is an important and integrated part of the scientific system. However, developments in science and society are changing Quality control into Quality monitoring. New, virtual, and fluid organizational forms are emerging. Common boundaries are seen as being broken down as, for example, in the “triple helix” and the “mode 2” concepts. The stakeholders in science are showing an interest in being more involved in science. They want their evaluation criteria to be used, and they want evaluations to be done on a regular basis because they do not trust the new scientific institutions to be left on their own. Quality monitoring changes the requirements for conducting evaluations as part of Quality control. Assessing the societal value of research becomes increasingly important. Finally, Quality monitoring emphasizes organizational learning rather than controlling Quality in scientific organizations.