Acarus Siro - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acarus Siro

The Experts below are selected from a list of 207 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Eva Johansson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • allergenic cross reactivity between the nematode anisakis simplex and the dust mites Acarus Siro lepidoglyphus destructor tyrophagus putrescentiae and dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
    Allergy, 2001
    Co-Authors: Eva Johansson, M Aponno, M Lundberg, M Van Hagehamsten

    Abstract:

    Background: The nematode Anisakis simplex is a common parasite on fish and other seafood. It is considered to be a food allergen and to induce IgE-mediated reactions. Allergenic cross-reactivity between A. simplex and other nematodes has been reported, as has cross-reactivity with arthropods: red mosquito larvae and German cockroach. We have here studied the allergenic relationship between A. simplex and four different dust-mite species.

    Methods: Serum samples collected from 69 farmers allergic to dust mites were analyzed for IgE to A. simplex by CAP FEIA. Allergenic cross-reactivity between A. simplex and dust mites was studied in two of the sera by CAP FEIA and immunoblotting inhibition.

    Results: We found that 14/69 farmers had detectable levels of IgE antibodies to A. simplex. The IgE response in CAP FEIA to A. simplex was inhibited to various degrees in the two studied sera by extracts of the dust mites Acarus Siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. In the reverse inhibition experiment, extract of A. simplex inhibited the response in both sera to A. Siro and T. putrescentiae, but not to L. destructor. The IgE binding to D. pteronyssinus was inhibited in one of the two sera. In blotting inhibition experiments, the IgE binding to several allergens in A. simplex was inhibited by each of the four mite extracts, especially by A. Siro and T. putrescentiae, which completely inhibited the IgE binding to several allergens.

    Conclusions: The results show allergenic cross-reactivity between several allergens in A. simplex and four dust-mite species. The clinical significance of this cross-reactivity remains to be evaluated.

  • identification and characterisation of two allergens from the dust mite Acarus Siro homologous with fatty acid binding proteins
    International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Tove L J Eriksson, Paul Whitley, Eva Johansson, Marianne Van Hagehamsten, Guro Gafvelin

    Abstract:

    Background: Dust mites are a major cause of allergic disease worldwide. The dust mite Acarus Siro is an inducer of occupational allergy among farmers, but sensiti

  • Identification and Characterisation of Two Allergens from the Dust Mite Acarus Siro, Homologous with Fatty Acid–Binding Proteins
    International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Tove L J Eriksson, Paul Whitley, Eva Johansson, Marianne Van Hage-hamsten, Guro Gafvelin

    Abstract:

    Background: Dust mites are a major cause of allergic disease worldwide. The dust mite Acarus Siro is an inducer of occupational allergy among farmers, but sensiti

Jan Hubert – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Detection and localization of Solitalea-like and Cardinium bacteria in three Acarus Siro populations (Astigmata: Acaridae)
    Experimental and Applied Acarology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jan Hubert, Marta Nesvorna, Jan Kopecky, M. Alejandra Perotti, Tomas Erban

    Abstract:

    Bacteria associated with mites influence their fitness, nutrition and reproduction. Previously, we found Solitalea -like ( Sphingobacteriales ) and Candidatus Cardinium ( Cytophagales ) bacteria in the stored product mite Acarus Siro L. by cloning and using pyrosequencing. In this study, taxon-specific primers targeting 16S rRNA gene were used to detect and quantify the bacteria in mites and eggs of three A. Siro populations. The specific probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to localize Solitalea -like and Cardinium bacteria in mite bodies. The population growth as an indirect estimator of fitness was used to describe the mite-bacteria interactions on (1) control diet; (2) rifampicin supplemented diet; (3) tetracycline supplemented diet; (4) rifampicin pretreated mites; (5) tetracycline pretreated mites. Solitalea -like 16S rRNA gene sequences from A. Siro formed a separate cluster together with sequences from Tyrophagus putrescentiae . qPCR analysis indicated that number of Solitalea -like bacteria 16S rRNA gene copies was ca. 100× higher than that of Cardinium and the numbers differed between populations. FISH analysis localized Solitalea -like bacteria in the parenchymal tissues, mesodeum and food bolus of larvae, nymphs and adults. Solitalea -like, but not Cardinium bacteria were detected by taxon-specific primers in mites and eggs of all three investigated populations. None of the antibiotic treatments eliminated Solitalea -like bacteria in the A. Siro populations tested. Rifampicin pretreatment significantly decreased the population growth. The numbers of Solitalea -like bacteria did not correlate with the population growth as a fitness indicator. This study demonstrated that A. Siro can host Solitalea -like bacteria either alone or together with Cardinium . We suggest that Solitalea -like bacteria are shared by vertical transfer in A. Siro populations.

  • differences in the bacterial community of laboratory and wild populations of the predatory mite cheyletus eruditus acarina cheyletidae and bacteria transmission from its prey Acarus Siro acari acaridae
    Journal of Economic Entomology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jan Hubert, Vaclav Stejskal, Marta Nesvorna, Jan Kopecky, Radek Aulický, Tomas Erban

    Abstract:

    The parthenogenetic predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus (Schrank, 1781) is used for biological control against mite pests produced as CHEYLETIN. Although there is evidence that bacteria are mainly responsible for parthenogeny in several species of predatory mites, the description of association between C. eruditus the specific and parasitic or symbiotic bacteria is still missing. We analyzed the bacterial communities of the predator, C. eruditus , and its prey, Acarus Siro L. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced. The selected bacterial taxa were confirmed by amplification of isolated DNA with taxon-specific primers. The 16S rRNA gene sequences from the predatory and prey mites formed a total of 20 different bacterial taxa. Of these taxa, the predator and prey shared four taxa, six taxa were specific for the predatory, and 10 taxa for the prey mites. Cardinium – and Bartonella -like bacteria were found in both mite species. The reproductive parasite Wolbachia was found only in the predatory mite, and A. Siro hosted Solitalea -like (Sphingobacteriales) bacteria that were not detected in C. eruditus . We focused on Cardinium occurrence in the field samples of C. eruditus. Using Cardinium -specific primers, 128 clones were obtained. Cardinium was found in seven field samples of C. eruditus as well as in the laboratory population that was used to produce CHEYLETIN. Phylogenetic analysis of the Cardinium clones identified three separate clusters: two clusters showed high similarity to the Cardinium sequences from astigmatid mites, and one cluster contained only the clones from C. eruditus . Sequences of both Cardinium and Wolbachia were found in the both adults and eggs of C. eruditus , indicating maternal transfer of these endosymbiotic bacteria.

  • Acarus Siro and tyrophagus putrescentiae acari acarididae transfer of fusarium culmorum into germinated barley increases mycotoxin deoxynivalenol content in barley under laboratory conditions
    International Journal of Acarology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jan Hubert, Marta Nesvorna, Martina Hujslova, Jitka Stara, Jana Hajslova, Vaclav Stejskal

    Abstract:

    The possibility of transferring Fusarium poae ((Peck) Wollenw.) and Fusarium culmorum ((W. G. Sm.) Sacc.) via mites into germinating barley was tested under laboratory conditions. The mites Acarus Siro Linnaeus, 1758 and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) were preincubated on fungal cultures and then introduced into germinated barley in two mite population densities: 10 and 50 individuals per 20 g of barley. The negative controls were germinated barley without added mites and barley with mites not preincubated on the fungal cultures. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) content in germinated barley was used as the marker of successful fungal transfer and colonization. DON concentrations were analysed 5 days after mite colonization. The mite preincubation on F. poae did not significantly increase DON concentration in barley. However, preincubation of mites on F. culmorum increased DON concentration in germinated barley by 5 and 8 times for A. Siro and T. putrescentiae, respectively. The population dens…

Guro Gafvelin – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • identification and characterisation of two allergens from the dust mite Acarus Siro homologous with fatty acid binding proteins
    International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Tove L J Eriksson, Paul Whitley, Eva Johansson, Marianne Van Hagehamsten, Guro Gafvelin

    Abstract:

    Background: Dust mites are a major cause of allergic disease worldwide. The dust mite Acarus Siro is an inducer of occupational allergy among farmers, but sensiti

  • Identification and Characterisation of Two Allergens from the Dust Mite Acarus Siro, Homologous with Fatty Acid–Binding Proteins
    International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Tove L J Eriksson, Paul Whitley, Eva Johansson, Marianne Van Hage-hamsten, Guro Gafvelin

    Abstract:

    Background: Dust mites are a major cause of allergic disease worldwide. The dust mite Acarus Siro is an inducer of occupational allergy among farmers, but sensiti