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Acceptable Daily Intake

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Ph. Verger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dietary exposure of children and teenagers to benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) in Beirut (Lebanon)
    Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 2007
    Co-Authors: L Soubra, C. Hilan, D. Sarkis, Ph. Verger

    Abstract:

    The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for a considered chemical is by definition the amount of that substance which can be ingested every day during the life time without appreciable health risk. The theoretical risk of exceeding the ADI for benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) has often been examined on the basis of worst case scenario. The aim of this paper is to assess the actual Intake of the food additives listed above for a group of the Lebanese population (students aged between 9 and 18 years old) likely to be highly exposed to food additives through the consumption of processed foods. Dietary exposure was obtained by combining food consumption data with food additives levels determined by chemical analysis. Food products available in Lebanon and containing added benzoates, sulphites, BHA and BHT were identified. Overall 420 samples of foods and beverages were analysed. The determination of food additives residue levels was carried out according to the official methods adopted in “Lebanese Institute for agronomic research” (IRAL) on food as consumed. The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) could be exceeded for sulphites and BHT by a fraction of the population, in particular within children of 9-13 years old. Among all food additive-containing foods, the highest contributors were: soft drinks to benzoates Intake, nuts and canned juices to sulphites Intake, bread and biscuits to BHA Intake and chewing gum to BHT Intake. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • Dietary exposure of children and teenagers to benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) in Beirut (Lebanon)
    Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP, 2006
    Co-Authors: Soubra, D. Sarkis, C. Hilan, Ph. Verger

    Abstract:

    The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for a considered chemical is by definition the amount of that substance which can be ingested every day during the life time without appreciable health risk. The theoretical risk of exceeding the ADI for benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) has often been examined on the basis of worst case scenario. The aim of this paper is to assess the actual Intake of the food additives listed above for a group of the Lebanese population (students aged between 9 and 18 years old) likely to be highly exposed to food additives through the consumption of processed foods. Dietary exposure was obtained by combining food consumption data with food additives levels determined by chemical analysis. Food products available in Lebanon and containing added benzoates, sulphites, BHA and BHT were identified. Overall 420 samples of foods and beverages were analysed. The determination of food additives residue levels was carried out according to the official methods adopted in “Lebanese Institute for agronomic research” (IRAL) on food as consumed. The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) could be exceeded for sulphites and BHT by a fraction of the population, in particular within children of 9-13 years old. Among all food additive-containing foods, the highest contributors were: soft drinks to benzoates Intake, nuts and canned juices to sulphites Intake, bread and biscuits to BHA Intake and chewing gum to BHT Intake.

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Clarence Sams – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Human volunteer studies investigating the potential for toxicokinetic interactions between the pesticides deltamethrin, pirimicarb and chlorpyrifos-methyl following oral exposure at the Acceptable Daily Intake
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2011
    Co-Authors: Clarence Sams

    Abstract:

    Objectives To determine whether there are metabolic interactions between deltamethrin or pirimicarb and chlorpyrifos-methyl in humans at dietary levels. Deltamethrin and pirimicarb are metabolised in-vivo by hydrolytic enzymes, which may be susceptible to inhibition by esterase-inhibiting compounds, such as chlorpyrifos-methyl. Methods Human volunteer studies have been conducted by orally administering the pesticides deltamethrin (0.01 mg/kg/day) or pirimicarb (0.02 mg/kg/day) at the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) together with chlorpyrifos-methyl (0.01 mg/kg/day), in order to investigate any potential interactions that may occur during dietary exposure. Urine samples were collected at time points up to at least 48 h post-exposure and metabolites were quantified. Urinary metabolite excretion data obtained from the mixed exposures were compared with data obtained from the same individuals given a dose of each individual pesticide on a separate occasion. Results Metabolite excretion profiles for both pesticides administered as a mixed dose with chlorpyrifos-methyl were qualitatively similar to those obtained for the individual doses. Peak excretion of deltamethrin and pirimicarb metabolites occurred at around 4 h post-exposure for both the individual and the mixed exposure scenarios, and metabolite excretion was almost complete within 24 h. No statistically significant differences were found between the individual and mixed doses for either metabolite excretion half-life or metabolite levels quantified in 24-h total urine collections. Conclusions The data presented here indicate that no significant toxicokinetic interactions occur in humans between either deltamethrin or pirimicarb and chlorpyrifos-methyl when orally administered together at the ADI.

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  • Human volunteer studies investigating the potential for toxicokinetic interactions between the pesticides deltamethrin; pirimicarb and chlorpyrifos-methyl following oral exposure at the Acceptable Daily Intake.
    Toxicology letters, 2010
    Co-Authors: Clarence Sams

    Abstract:

    Human volunteer studies have been conducted by orally administering the pesticides deltamethrin (0.01 mg/kg/day) or pirimicarb (0.02 mg/kg/day) at the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) together with chlorpyrifos-methyl (0.01 mg/kg/day), in order to investigate any potential interactions that may occur during dietary exposure. Deltamethrin and pirimicarb are metabolised in vivo by hydrolytic enzymes, which may be susceptible to inhibition by esterase-inhibiting compounds, such as chlorpyrifos-methyl. Urine samples were collected at time points up to at least 48 h post-exposure and metabolites were quantified. Urinary metabolite excretion data obtained from the mixed exposures were compared with data obtained from the same individuals given a dose of each individual pesticide on a separate occasion. Metabolite excretion profiles for both pesticides administered as a mixed dose with chlorpyrifos-methyl were qualitatively similar to those obtained for the individual doses. Peak excretion of deltamethrin and pirimicarb metabolites occurred at around 4h post-exposure for both the individual and the mixed exposure scenarios, and metabolite excretion was almost complete within 24h. No statistically significant differences were found between the individual and mixed doses for either metabolite excretion half-life or metabolite levels quantified in 24-h total urine collections. The data presented here indicate that no significant toxicokinetic interactions occur between either deltamethrin or pirimicarb and chlorpyrifos-methyl when orally administered together at the ADI.

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D. Sarkis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dietary exposure of children and teenagers to benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) in Beirut (Lebanon)
    Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 2007
    Co-Authors: L Soubra, C. Hilan, D. Sarkis, Ph. Verger

    Abstract:

    The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for a considered chemical is by definition the amount of that substance which can be ingested every day during the life time without appreciable health risk. The theoretical risk of exceeding the ADI for benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) has often been examined on the basis of worst case scenario. The aim of this paper is to assess the actual Intake of the food additives listed above for a group of the Lebanese population (students aged between 9 and 18 years old) likely to be highly exposed to food additives through the consumption of processed foods. Dietary exposure was obtained by combining food consumption data with food additives levels determined by chemical analysis. Food products available in Lebanon and containing added benzoates, sulphites, BHA and BHT were identified. Overall 420 samples of foods and beverages were analysed. The determination of food additives residue levels was carried out according to the official methods adopted in “Lebanese Institute for agronomic research” (IRAL) on food as consumed. The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) could be exceeded for sulphites and BHT by a fraction of the population, in particular within children of 9-13 years old. Among all food additive-containing foods, the highest contributors were: soft drinks to benzoates Intake, nuts and canned juices to sulphites Intake, bread and biscuits to BHA Intake and chewing gum to BHT Intake. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • Dietary exposure of children and teenagers to benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) in Beirut (Lebanon)
    Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP, 2006
    Co-Authors: Soubra, D. Sarkis, C. Hilan, Ph. Verger

    Abstract:

    The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for a considered chemical is by definition the amount of that substance which can be ingested every day during the life time without appreciable health risk. The theoretical risk of exceeding the ADI for benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) has often been examined on the basis of worst case scenario. The aim of this paper is to assess the actual Intake of the food additives listed above for a group of the Lebanese population (students aged between 9 and 18 years old) likely to be highly exposed to food additives through the consumption of processed foods. Dietary exposure was obtained by combining food consumption data with food additives levels determined by chemical analysis. Food products available in Lebanon and containing added benzoates, sulphites, BHA and BHT were identified. Overall 420 samples of foods and beverages were analysed. The determination of food additives residue levels was carried out according to the official methods adopted in “Lebanese Institute for agronomic research” (IRAL) on food as consumed. The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) could be exceeded for sulphites and BHT by a fraction of the population, in particular within children of 9-13 years old. Among all food additive-containing foods, the highest contributors were: soft drinks to benzoates Intake, nuts and canned juices to sulphites Intake, bread and biscuits to BHA Intake and chewing gum to BHT Intake.

    Free Register to Access Article