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Acellular Scaffold

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William M. Kuzon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • contractile skeletal muscle tissue engineered on an Acellular Scaffold
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Gregory H. Borschel, Robert G Dennis, William M. Kuzon
    Abstract:

    For the reconstructive surgeon, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle may offer reduced donor-site morbidity and an unlimited supply of tissue. Using an Acellularized mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle as a Scaffold, the authors produced engineered skeletal muscle capable of generating longitudinal force. Eight extensor digitorum longus muscles from adult mice were made Acellular using a protocol developed in the authors’ laboratory. The Acellular muscles were then placed in a bath of 20% fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium and 100 U/ml penicillin for 1 week at room temperature. C2C12 myoblasts were injected into the Acellular muscle matrix using a 26-gauge needle and a 100-μl syringe. The resulting constructs were placed in growth medium for 1 week at 37°C under 5% carbon dioxide, with media changes every 48 hours. The constructs were then placed in differentiation medium for 1 week, with media changes every 48 hours. Isometric contractile force testing of the constructs demonstrated production of longitudinal contractile force on electrical stimstimulation. A length-tension, or Starling, relationship was observed. Light and electron microscopy studies demonstrated recapitulation of some of the normal histologic features of developing skeletal muscle.

  • Contractile skeletal muscle tissue-engineered on an Acellular Scaffold.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Gregory H. Borschel, Robert G Dennis, William M. Kuzon
    Abstract:

    For the reconstructive surgeon, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle may offer reduced donor-site morbidity and an unlimited supply of tissue. Using an Acellularized mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle as a Scaffold, the authors produced engineered skeletal muscle capable of generating longitudinal force. Eight extensor digitorum longus muscles from adult mice were made Acellular using a protocol developed in the authors’ laboratory. The Acellular muscles were then placed in a bath of 20% fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium and 100 U/ml penicillin for 1 week at room temperature. C2C12 myoblasts were injected into the Acellular muscle matrix using a 26-gauge needle and a 100-microl syringe. The resulting constructs were placed in growth medium for 1 week at 37 degrees C under 5% carbon dioxide, with media changes every 48 hours. The constructs were then placed in differentiation medium for 1 week, with media changes every 48 hours. Isometric contractile force testing of the constructs demonstrated production of longitudinal contractile force on electrical stimstimulation. A length-tension, or Starling, relationship was observed. Light and electron microscopy studies demonstrated recapitulation of some of the normal histologic features of developing skeletal muscle.

Roger W. Chan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acellular Tissue Engineering Scaffolds for Vocal Fold Regeneration
    2010 4th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2010
    Co-Authors: Roger W. Chan
    Abstract:

    A variety of xenogeneic and allogeneic extrAcellular matrix (ECM) Scaffolds have been promising in various tissue engineering applications, such as the porcine small intestinal submucosa. Yet no particular Scaffolds have been optimal for vocal fold regeneration. The decellularized human umbilical vein (HUV) is a novel allogeneic Scaffold that has shown some promise for cardiovascular tissue engineering. This study examines the potential of the HUV as an Acellular Scaffold for engineering the vocal fold lamina propria, in order to develop an implantable tissue substitute that can promote a natural ECM remodeling response. A novel saline-based decellularization protocol developed in our laboratory was used to fabricate a three-dimensional (3-D), biodegradable, Acellular Scaffold from native HUV tissue. Histological examination and scanning electron microscopy indicated that native cells in the HUV were removed with a fine 3-D structure of proteins and proteoglycans well preserved. Primary human vocal fold fibroblasts were cultivated on the abluminal surface of the Acellular Scaffold in vitro. Significant proliferation and infiltration of the fibroblasts in the Scaffold were observed. These findings supported the biocompatibility of the HUV Scaffold, and its promise for vocal fold reconstruction and regeneration.

  • Controlled release of hepatocyte growth factor from a bovine Acellular Scaffold for vocal fold reconstruction.
    Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, 2010
    Co-Authors: Roger W. Chan, Debra G. Weinberger, Guy Efune, Karen S. Pawlowski
    Abstract:

    A bovine Acellular Scaffold was found to facilitate tissue remodeling in a rat model of vocal fold injury, whereas hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been shown to have an antiscarring effect in the larynx. This study examined the loading and release kinetics of HGF in vitro, and the potential of the Acellular Scaffold as a timed-release system for the delivery of HGF in vivo. Bilateral wounds were created in the posterior vocal folds of 20 rats, with HGF-loaded Acellular Scaffolds implanted into the wounds unilaterally, and Scaffolds without HGF implanted into the contralateral vocal folds as control. The rats were humanely sacrificed after 3, 7, 30, and 90 days and their larynges were examined histologically and immunohistochemically. Expressions of key matrix proteins in the vocal fold coronal sections were quantified by digital image analysis. Results demonstrated a gradual, sustained release of HGF for at least 7 days in vitro, consistent with the detection of glycosaminoglycans inherent of the Scaffold. In rat vocal folds implanted with HGF-loaded Scaffolds, apparently fewer inflammatory cells were observed 3 days after surgery when compared to the control. The mean relative densities of collagen III and hyaluronic acid were significantly lower than those of the control 7 days after surgery. Scaffold implants were apparently degraded by 3 months in all animals, with no evidence of fibrosis or calcification. These data suggested that the bovine Acellular Scaffold could be promising for the exogenous delivery of select growth factors in vivo.

  • A bovine Acellular Scaffold for vocal fold reconstruction in a rat model
    Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, 2010
    Co-Authors: Roger W. Chan, Debra G. Weinberger, Guy Efune, Karen S. Pawlowski
    Abstract:

    With a rat model of vocal fold injury, this study examined the in vivo host response to an Acellular xenogeneic Scaffold derived from the bovine vocal fold lamina propria, and the potential of the Scaffold for constructive tissue remodeling. Bilateral wounds were created in the posterior vocal folds of 20 rats, and bovine Acellular Scaffolds were implanted into the wounds unilaterally, with the contralateral vocal folds as control. The rats were humanely sacrificed after 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months, and the coronal sections of their larynges were examined histologically. Expressions of key matrix proteins including collagen I, collagen III, elastin, fibronectin, hyaluronic acid, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified with digital image analysis. Significant infiltration of host inflammatory cells and host fibroblasts in the Scaffold implant was observed in the acute stage of wound repair (3 days and 7 days postsurgery). The mean relative densities of collagen I, collagen III, and GAGs in the implanted vocal folds were significantly higher than those in the control after 3 days, followed by gradual decreases over 3 months. Histological results showed that the Scaffolds were apparently degraded by 3 months, with no fibrotic tissue formation or calcification. These preliminary findings suggested that the bovine Acellular Scaffold could be a potential xenograft for vocal fold regeneration.

Gregory H. Borschel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • contractile skeletal muscle tissue engineered on an Acellular Scaffold
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Gregory H. Borschel, Robert G Dennis, William M. Kuzon
    Abstract:

    For the reconstructive surgeon, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle may offer reduced donor-site morbidity and an unlimited supply of tissue. Using an Acellularized mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle as a Scaffold, the authors produced engineered skeletal muscle capable of generating longitudinal force. Eight extensor digitorum longus muscles from adult mice were made Acellular using a protocol developed in the authors’ laboratory. The Acellular muscles were then placed in a bath of 20% fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium and 100 U/ml penicillin for 1 week at room temperature. C2C12 myoblasts were injected into the Acellular muscle matrix using a 26-gauge needle and a 100-μl syringe. The resulting constructs were placed in growth medium for 1 week at 37°C under 5% carbon dioxide, with media changes every 48 hours. The constructs were then placed in differentiation medium for 1 week, with media changes every 48 hours. Isometric contractile force testing of the constructs demonstrated production of longitudinal contractile force on electrical stimulation. A length-tension, or Starling, relationship was observed. Light and electron microscopy studies demonstrated recapitulation of some of the normal histologic features of developing skeletal muscle.

  • Contractile skeletal muscle tissue-engineered on an Acellular Scaffold.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2004
    Co-Authors: Gregory H. Borschel, Robert G Dennis, William M. Kuzon
    Abstract:

    For the reconstructive surgeon, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle may offer reduced donor-site morbidity and an unlimited supply of tissue. Using an Acellularized mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle as a Scaffold, the authors produced engineered skeletal muscle capable of generating longitudinal force. Eight extensor digitorum longus muscles from adult mice were made Acellular using a protocol developed in the authors’ laboratory. The Acellular muscles were then placed in a bath of 20% fetal bovine serum in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium and 100 U/ml penicillin for 1 week at room temperature. C2C12 myoblasts were injected into the Acellular muscle matrix using a 26-gauge needle and a 100-microl syringe. The resulting constructs were placed in growth medium for 1 week at 37 degrees C under 5% carbon dioxide, with media changes every 48 hours. The constructs were then placed in differentiation medium for 1 week, with media changes every 48 hours. Isometric contractile force testing of the constructs demonstrated production of longitudinal contractile force on electrical stimulation. A length-tension, or Starling, relationship was observed. Light and electron microscopy studies demonstrated recapitulation of some of the normal histologic features of developing skeletal muscle.

Karen S. Pawlowski – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Controlled release of hepatocyte growth factor from a bovine Acellular Scaffold for vocal fold reconstruction.
    Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, 2010
    Co-Authors: Roger W. Chan, Debra G. Weinberger, Guy Efune, Karen S. Pawlowski
    Abstract:

    A bovine Acellular Scaffold was found to facilitate tissue remodeling in a rat model of vocal fold injury, whereas hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been shown to have an antiscarring effect in the larynx. This study examined the loading and release kinetics of HGF in vitro, and the potential of the Acellular Scaffold as a timed-release system for the delivery of HGF in vivo. Bilateral wounds were created in the posterior vocal folds of 20 rats, with HGF-loaded Acellular Scaffolds implanted into the wounds unilaterally, and Scaffolds without HGF implanted into the contralateral vocal folds as control. The rats were humanely sacrificed after 3, 7, 30, and 90 days and their larynges were examined histologically and immunohistochemically. Expressions of key matrix proteins in the vocal fold coronal sections were quantified by digital image analysis. Results demonstrated a gradual, sustained release of HGF for at least 7 days in vitro, consistent with the detection of glycosaminoglycans inherent of the Scaffold. In rat vocal folds implanted with HGF-loaded Scaffolds, apparently fewer inflammatory cells were observed 3 days after surgery when compared to the control. The mean relative densities of collagen III and hyaluronic acid were significantly lower than those of the control 7 days after surgery. Scaffold implants were apparently degraded by 3 months in all animals, with no evidence of fibrosis or calcification. These data suggested that the bovine Acellular Scaffold could be promising for the exogenous delivery of select growth factors in vivo.

  • A bovine Acellular Scaffold for vocal fold reconstruction in a rat model
    Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, 2010
    Co-Authors: Roger W. Chan, Debra G. Weinberger, Guy Efune, Karen S. Pawlowski
    Abstract:

    With a rat model of vocal fold injury, this study examined the in vivo host response to an Acellular xenogeneic Scaffold derived from the bovine vocal fold lamina propria, and the potential of the Scaffold for constructive tissue remodeling. Bilateral wounds were created in the posterior vocal folds of 20 rats, and bovine Acellular Scaffolds were implanted into the wounds unilaterally, with the contralateral vocal folds as control. The rats were humanely sacrificed after 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months, and the coronal sections of their larynges were examined histologically. Expressions of key matrix proteins including collagen I, collagen III, elastin, fibronectin, hyaluronic acid, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified with digital image analysis. Significant infiltration of host inflammatory cells and host fibroblasts in the Scaffold implant was observed in the acute stage of wound repair (3 days and 7 days postsurgery). The mean relative densities of collagen I, collagen III, and GAGs in the implanted vocal folds were significantly higher than those in the control after 3 days, followed by gradual decreases over 3 months. Histological results showed that the Scaffolds were apparently degraded by 3 months, with no fibrotic tissue formation or calcification. These preliminary findings suggested that the bovine Acellular Scaffold could be a potential xenograft for vocal fold regeneration.

Samotus Aneta – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Biomechanical and morphological stability of Acellular Scaffolds for tissue-engineered heart valves depends on different storage conditions.
    Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, 2018
    Co-Authors: Piotr Wilczek, Gach Paulina, Jendryczko Karolina, Marcisz Martyna, Wilczek Grazyna, Major Roman, Mzyk Aldona, Sypien Anna, Samotus Aneta
    Abstract:

    Currently available bioprosthetic heart valves have been successfully used clinically; however, they have several limitations. Alternatively, tissue-engineering techniques can be used. However, there are limited data concerning the impact of storage conditions of Scaffolds on their biomechanics and morphology. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different storage conditions on the biomechanics and morphology of pulmonary valve dedicated for the Acellular Scaffold preparation to achieve optimal conditions to obtain stable heart valve prostheses. Scaffold can then be used for the construction of tissue-engineered heart valve, for this reason evaluation of these parameters can determine the success of the clinical application this type of bioprosthesis. Pulmonary heart valves were collected from adult porcines. Materials were divided into five groups depending on the storage conditions. Biomechanical tests were performed, both the static tensile test, and examination of viscoelastic properties. ExtrAcellular matrix morphology was evaluated using transmission elecelectron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Tissue stored at 4 °C exhibited a higher modulus of elasticity than the control (native) and fresh Acellular, which indicated the stiffening of the tissue and changes of the viscoelastic properties. Such changes were not observed in the radial direction. Percent strain was not significantly different in the study groups. The storage conditions affected the Acellularization efficiency and tissue morphology. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first that attributes the mechanical properties of pulmonary valve tissue to the biomechanical changes in the collagen network due to different storage conditions. Storage conditions of Scaffolds for tissue-engineered heart valves may have a significant impact on the haemodynamic and clinical effects of the used bioprostheses.