Achillea millefolium - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Achillea millefolium

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3519 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Maria Consuelo Andrade Marques – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • antiulcerogenic activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Achillea millefolium l involvement of the antioxidant system
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Francine Bittencourt Potrich, Cristiane Hatsuko Baggio, Cristina Setim Freitas, Alexandra Allemand, Luisa Mota Da Silva, Ana Cristina Dos Santos, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno Mendes, Eunice Andre, Maria Fernanda De Paula Werner, Maria Consuelo Andrade Marques

    Abstract:

    Abstract Achillea millefolium L. is a member of the Asteraceae family that is commonly referred to as “yarrow” and has been used in folk medicine against several disturbances including skin inflammations, spasmodic and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as hepato-biliary complaints. Aim of the study In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of a hydroalcoholic extract from the Achillea millefolium (HE) for gastroprotective properties and additional mechanism(s) involved in this activity. Material and methods Rats were treated with HE and subsequently exposed to both acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol P.A. and chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid. Following treatment, glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured. The activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and histological and immunohistochemical analysis were performed in animals with acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers. Results Oral administration of HE (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg) inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions by 35, 56 and 81%, respectively. Oral treatment with HE (1 and 10 mg/kg) reduced the chronic gastric ulcers induced by acetic acid by 43 and 65%, respectively, and promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa after ulcer induction denoting increased cell proliferation, which was confirmed by PCNA immunohistochemistry. HE treatment prevented the reduction of GSH levels and SOD activity after acetic acid-induced gastric lesions. In addition, HE (10 mg/kg) inhibited the MPO activity in acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the antioxidant properties of HE may contribute to the gastroprotective activity of this extract.

  • safety and antiulcer efficacy studies of Achillea millefolium l after chronic treatment in wistar rats
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Ana Maria Cavalcanti, Jose Eduardo Da Silvasantos, Cristiane Hatsuko Baggio, Cristina Setim Freitas, Lia Rieck, Renato Silva De Sousa, Sonia Mesiavela, Maria Consuelo Andrade Marques

    Abstract:

    Abstract Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae), popularly known as yarrow, has been used in folk medicine to treat complaints such as inflammation, pain, wounds, hemorrhages and gastrointestinal disturbances. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the aqueous extract (AE) of the plant after chronic exposure. Indeed, the AE was effective in protecting the gastric mucosa against acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin and in healing chronic gastric lesions induced by acetic acid with (ED50 = 32 mg/kg, p.o.). Safety studies were performed in female and male Wistar rats treated daily with AE (0.3–1.2 g/kg, p.o./day) or vehicle (water, 10 ml/kg/day) for 28 or 90 consecutive days. Satellite groups consisted of animals sacrificed 30 days after the end of these treatments. Clinical observations, body and organ weight measurements, gross autopsy, hematology, clinical biochemical and histopathological examinations were performed. Slight changes in liver weight, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and glucose were observed in male and female animals. These changes were not correlated with dose or time of exposure of the animals to the AE. Overall, the results show the antiulcer potential of the aerial parts of the Achillea millefolium which is accompanied by no signs of relevant toxicity even at very long chronic exposure.

G B Lockwood – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • volatile constituents of Achillea millefolium l ssp millefolium from iran
    Flavour and Fragrance Journal, 1996
    Co-Authors: Suleiman Afsharypuor, Sadigheh Asgary, G B Lockwood

    Abstract:

    The volatile constituents of Achillea millefolium L. ssp, millefolium growing wild north-east of Teheran, Iran, were studied by GC and GC-MS. Twenty-one constituents were identified. The main components were α-bisabolol, spathulenol, cis-nerolidol, cis-carveol and trans, trans-farnesol. The percentage of sesquiterpenic components was high, attaining 55.4% of the total oil.

Suleiman Afsharypuor – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • volatile constituents of Achillea millefolium l ssp millefolium from iran
    Flavour and Fragrance Journal, 1996
    Co-Authors: Suleiman Afsharypuor, Sadigheh Asgary, G B Lockwood

    Abstract:

    The volatile constituents of Achillea millefolium L. ssp, millefolium growing wild north-east of Teheran, Iran, were studied by GC and GC-MS. Twenty-one constituents were identified. The main components were α-bisabolol, spathulenol, cis-nerolidol, cis-carveol and trans, trans-farnesol. The percentage of sesquiterpenic components was high, attaining 55.4% of the total oil.