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Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

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Yasuhiro Ishiga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl Activates Stomatal-Based Defense Systemically in Japanese Radish
    Frontiers in plant science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nanami Sakata, Takako Ishiga, Shizuku Taniguchi, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM) is a well-known plant activator, which is a synthetic analog of salicylic acid (SA). Recently, copper fungicides and antibiotics are major strategies for controlling bacterial diseases. However, resistant strains have already been found. Therefore, there is an increasing demand for sustainable new disease control strategies. We investigated the ASM disease control effect against Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis (Pcal), which causes bacterial blight on Japanese radish. In this study, we demonstrated that ASM effectively suppressed Pcal disease symptom development associated with reduced bacterial populations on Japanese radish leaves. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that ASM activated systemic acquired resistance (SAR), including stomatal-based defense on ASM-untreated upper and lower leaves. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) are essential second messengers in stomatal-based defense. We found that ASM induced stomatal closure by inducing ROS production through peroxidase. These results indicate that stomatal closure induced by ASM treatment is effective for preventing Pcal pathogen invasion into plants, and in turn reduction of disease development.

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  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl and probenazole activate stomatal-based defense at different times to control bacterial blight of cabbage
    Journal of General Plant Pathology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Takako Ishiga, Nanami Sakata, Tsutomu Ugajin, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    In efforts to control bacterial blight caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis ( Pcal ) on cabbage using plant defense activators acibenzolar- S -methyl (ASM) and probenazole (PBZ), a soil drench with ASM and PBZ effectively suppressed Pcal lesion formation and reduced bacterial populations compared with a water drench. Although ASM and PBZ activated stomatal-based defense against Pcal resulting in lower bacterial populations and less-severe symptoms, ASM, but not PBZ, induced stomatal-based defense within 4 h after the soil drench. Thus, ASM and PBZ activate a stomatal-based defense in cabbage against Pcal but differ the timing of induction.

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  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl activates stomatal-based defense against Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in cabbage
    Journal of General Plant Pathology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Takako Ishiga, Nanami Sakata, Shizuku Taniguchi, Tsutomu Ugajin, Yumi Iida, Tetsuya Hirata, Keisuke Hayashi, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis ( Pcal ), which causes bacterial blight of brassicaceous plants, is an economically important pathogen worldwide. Copper fungicide and antibiotics are major strategies to manage the disease caused by Pcal ; however, a Pcal strain resistant to these chemicals has already been found, and severe outbreaks of bacterial blight have been reported on cabbage in Japan. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new Pcal management strategies. Plant defense activators could be useful not only to protect plants against invading pathogens, but also to reduce the amount of copper fungicides and antibiotics applied. However, the mechanisms by which plant defense activators contribute to controlling diseases remains unclear. In this work, we focused on cabbage and acibenzolar- S -methyl (ASM), a well-known plant defense activator. Expression profiles revealed that ASM induced expression of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) marker genes including PR1 , PR2 , and PR5 in cabbage plants. We also demonstrated that a soil drench with ASM 2 h before transplanting clearly reduced bacterial blight symptoms and reduced Pcal bacterial populations in cabbage. ASM application was also able to prime cabbage for Pcal resistance by activating stomatal-based defense. Our findings highlight that ASM protects plants from bacterial pathogens by activating stomatal-based defense.

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Claire Richard – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Heterogeneous Photochemistry of Agrochemicals at the Leaf Surface: A Case Study of Plant Activator Acibenzolar-S-Methyl.
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 2017
    Co-Authors: M. Sleiman, P. De Sainte-claire, Claire Richard

    Abstract:

    The photoreactivity of plant activator benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), commonly named Acibenzolar-S-Methyl, was studied on the surfaces of glass, paraffinic wax films, and apple leaves. Experiments were carried out in a solar simulator using pure and formulated BTH (BION). Surface photoproducts were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry, while volatile photoproducts were characterized using an online thermal desorption system coupled to a gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) system. Pure BTH degraded quickly on wax surfaces with a half-life of 5.0 ± 0.5 h, whereas photolysis of formulated BTH was 7 times slower (t1/2 = 36 ± 14 h). On the other hand, formulated BTH was found to photolyze quickly on detached apple leaves with a half-life of 2.8 h ± 0.4 h. This drastic difference in photoreactivity was attributed to the nature and spreading of the BTH deposit, as influenced by the sur…

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  • Effect of Acibenzolar-S-Methyl phototransformation on its elicitation activity in tobacco cells.
    Plant physiology and biochemistry : PPB, 2017
    Co-Authors: Florent Lavergne, Claire Richard, Marc Saudreau, Jean-stéphane Venisse, Boris Fumanal, Pascale Goupil

    Abstract:

    Abstract The plant activator Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (BTH) undergoes phototransformation when exposed to solar radiation. Here we investigated the changes in its elicitation properties on BY-2 tobacco cells at different stages of the photochemical reaction. Both pure BTH and formulated BTH were irradiated in controlled conditions to achieve different extents of conversion. Both pure BTH (900 μM) and Bion® (0.4 g.L−1) induced BY-2 cell death, but BTH photoconverted to an extent of 25 ± 3% lowered the cell death rate. A kinetic study of β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase activities was conducted on BY-2 extracellular medium. Exposure of tobacco cells to either pure BTH or Bion® resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both defense enzymes, which peaked 48 h after the treatment. The pathogenesis-related (PR) protein activities were quantified 48 h after elicitation for a range of phototransformed BTH solutions. The enzyme activities were reduced when BY-2 cells were treated with solutions in which BTH conversion was 22 ± 3%, 42 ± 3% and 100 ± 3%, but were not affected by the solution in which BTH was phototransformed at 60%, suggesting that some of the secondary photoproducts also exhibit eliciting properties. Solar irradiation of BTH thus impairs its elicitation properties, but this impairment depends strongly on the extent of phototransformation.

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  • Photochemical transformation of the plant activator Acibenzolar-S-Methyl in solution
    Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 2017
    Co-Authors: M. Sleiman, M. Stawinoga, S. Wang, P. De Sainte-claire, Pascale Goupil, Claire Richard

    Abstract:

    Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (BTH) is used to protect plants from pathogens by triggering Systemic Acquired Resistance. While this compound absorbs solar light strongly, little is known on its ability to undergo photodegradation and on the generated photoproducts. In the present work, we studied the photolysis of BTH dissolved in solvents of different polarities: n-heptane to mimic the hydrophobic surface of leaves and more polar solvents to simulate polar environmental compartments. We found that BTH is easily photodegraded in simulated solar light. The quantum yield of photolysis at 313 nm ranges from 0.048 to 0.092 depending on the solvent. LC-ESI-HRMS analyses in negative and positive modes revealed the presence of numerous photoproducts arising from two initial reaction pathways. As confirmed by DFT calculations, the main pathway involves the S-N bond cleavage followed by N-2 loss. The scission of the thioester bond with the generation of acyl and SCH3 radicals also takes place. Based on these findings, it can be predicted that BTH should undergo fast photodegradation once released in the environment and lead to numerous new compounds. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Nanami Sakata – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl Activates Stomatal-Based Defense Systemically in Japanese Radish
    Frontiers in plant science, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nanami Sakata, Takako Ishiga, Shizuku Taniguchi, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM) is a well-known plant activator, which is a synthetic analog of salicylic acid (SA). Recently, copper fungicides and antibiotics are major strategies for controlling bacterial diseases. However, resistant strains have already been found. Therefore, there is an increasing demand for sustainable new disease control strategies. We investigated the ASM disease control effect against Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis (Pcal), which causes bacterial blight on Japanese radish. In this study, we demonstrated that ASM effectively suppressed Pcal disease symptom development associated with reduced bacterial populations on Japanese radish leaves. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that ASM activated systemic acquired resistance (SAR), including stomatal-based defense on ASM-untreated upper and lower leaves. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) are essential second messengers in stomatal-based defense. We found that ASM induced stomatal closure by inducing ROS production through peroxidase. These results indicate that stomatal closure induced by ASM treatment is effective for preventing Pcal pathogen invasion into plants, and in turn reduction of disease development.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl and probenazole activate stomatal-based defense at different times to control bacterial blight of cabbage
    Journal of General Plant Pathology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Takako Ishiga, Nanami Sakata, Tsutomu Ugajin, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    In efforts to control bacterial blight caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis ( Pcal ) on cabbage using plant defense activators acibenzolar- S -methyl (ASM) and probenazole (PBZ), a soil drench with ASM and PBZ effectively suppressed Pcal lesion formation and reduced bacterial populations compared with a water drench. Although ASM and PBZ activated stomatal-based defense against Pcal resulting in lower bacterial populations and less-severe symptoms, ASM, but not PBZ, induced stomatal-based defense within 4 h after the soil drench. Thus, ASM and PBZ activate a stomatal-based defense in cabbage against Pcal but differ the timing of induction.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Acibenzolar-S-Methyl activates stomatal-based defense against Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in cabbage
    Journal of General Plant Pathology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Takako Ishiga, Nanami Sakata, Shizuku Taniguchi, Tsutomu Ugajin, Yumi Iida, Tetsuya Hirata, Keisuke Hayashi, Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis ( Pcal ), which causes bacterial blight of brassicaceous plants, is an economically important pathogen worldwide. Copper fungicide and antibiotics are major strategies to manage the disease caused by Pcal ; however, a Pcal strain resistant to these chemicals has already been found, and severe outbreaks of bacterial blight have been reported on cabbage in Japan. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new Pcal management strategies. Plant defense activators could be useful not only to protect plants against invading pathogens, but also to reduce the amount of copper fungicides and antibiotics applied. However, the mechanisms by which plant defense activators contribute to controlling diseases remains unclear. In this work, we focused on cabbage and acibenzolar- S -methyl (ASM), a well-known plant defense activator. Expression profiles revealed that ASM induced expression of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) marker genes including PR1 , PR2 , and PR5 in cabbage plants. We also demonstrated that a soil drench with ASM 2 h before transplanting clearly reduced bacterial blight symptoms and reduced Pcal bacterial populations in cabbage. ASM application was also able to prime cabbage for Pcal resistance by activating stomatal-based defense. Our findings highlight that ASM protects plants from bacterial pathogens by activating stomatal-based defense.

    Free Register to Access Article