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Deborah D.l. Chung – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Pore Structure and Permeability of an Alumina Fiber Filter Membrane for Hot Gas Filtration
    Journal of Porous Materials, 2002
    Co-Authors: J. A. Fernando, Deborah D.l. Chung

    Abstract:

    The pore structure and permeability of an alumina-fiber-based hot gas filter membrane containing an Acid Phosphate binder were characterized using capillary flow porometry. The smallest pore diameter was 1.24 ± 0.06 μm; the largest pore diameter (bubble point pore diameter) was 23 ± 1 μm. The pore size distribution was narrow, with almost all pores ranging from 2 to 4 μm, and the mean flow pore size 2.6 ± 0.1 μm. The Darcy permeability constant for air through the membrane was (114 ± 6) × 10^−9 cm^2.

  • Improving an alumina fiber filter membrane for hot gas filtration using an Acid Phosphate binder
    Journal of Materials Science, 2001
    Co-Authors: J. A. Fernando, Deborah D.l. Chung

    Abstract:

    Alumina fiber based filter membranes were prepared using Acid Phosphate (phosphoric Acid plus aluminum hydroxide), colloidal alumina, monoaluminum Phosphate and three types of colloidal silica binders at various binders contents. The filter membranes containing between 5% and 10% by weight of Acid Phosphate binder exhibited the highest flexural strength, compressive strength, work of fracture and elastic modulus in comparison to those containing the other binders at equivalent binder contents, and exhibited the lowest pressure drop in comparison to membranes with other binders and having equivalent flexural and compressive strengths. Microscopy showed that the Acid Phosphate caused the fibers to bond at their junctions only, whereas colloidal alumina or colloidal silica binders caused free binder particles within the fiber network.

  • improvement of the temperature resistance of aluminium matrix composites using an Acid Phosphate binder part iii aluminium matrix composites
    Journal of Materials Science, 1993
    Co-Authors: Jeng Maw Chiou, Deborah D.l. Chung

    Abstract:

    The use of Phosphate binders instead of the widely used silica binder resulted in improved temperature resistance, increased tensile strength and decreased coefficient of thermal expansion. The effects were largest for the Phosphate binder which contained the largest amount of phosphoric Acid (P/Al atom ratio=24 in the liquid binder). These effects were probably due to the protection of the SiC whiskers by the binder phases (aluminium metaPhosphate or aluminium orthoPhosphate), the binder-SiC reaction product (SiP 2 O 7 ) and the binder-aluminium reaction product (AlP) from further reaction between the SiC and aluminium

Laurent Nussaume – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • interplay between jasmonic Acid Phosphate signaling and the regulation of glycerolipid homeostasis in arabidopsis
    Plant and Cell Physiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Chevalier, Laura Cuyas, Juliette Jouhet, Vali Rie Gros, Serge Chiarenza, David Secco, James Whelan, Khawla Seddiki, Maryse A Block, Laurent Nussaume

    Abstract:

    : Jasmonic Acid (JA) biosynthesis and signaling are activated in Arabidopsis cultivated in Phosphate (Pi) deprived conditions. This activation occurs mainly in photosynthetic tissues and is less important in roots. In leaves, the enhanced biosynthesis of JA coincides with membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered by the lack of Pi. We addressed the possible role of JA on the dynamics and magnitude of glycerolipid remodeling in response to Pi deprivation and resupply. Based on combined analyses of gene expression, JA biosynthesis and glycerolipid remodeling in wild-type Arabidopsis and in the coi1-16 mutant, JA signaling seems important in the determination of the basal levels of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic Acid (PA), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol. JA impact on MGDG steady state level and fluctuations seem contradictory. In the coi1-16 mutant, the steady state level of MGDG is higher, possibly due to a higher level of PA in the mutant, activating MGD1, and to an increased expression of MGD3. These results support a possible impact of JA in limiting the overall content of this lipid. Concerning lipid variations, upon Pi deprivation, JA seems rather associated with a specific MGDG increase. Following Pi resupply, whereas the expression of glycerolipid remodeling genes returns to basal level, JA biosynthesis and signaling genes are still upregulated, likely due to a JA-induced positive feedback remaining active. Distinct impacts on enzymes synthesizing MGDG, that is, downregulating MGD3, possibly activating MGD1 expression and limiting the activation of MGD1 via PA, might allow JA playing a role in a sophisticated fine tuning of galactolipid variations.

  • Interplay between Jasmonic Acid, Phosphate Signaling and the Regulation of Glycerolipid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis
    Plant and Cell Physiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Florian Chevalier, Laura Cuyas, Juliette Jouhet, Serge Chiarenza, David Secco, James Whelan, Khawla Seddiki, Valérie Gros, Maryse Block, Laurent Nussaume

    Abstract:

    Jasmonic Acid (JA) biosynthesis and signaling are activated in Arabidopsis cultivated in Phosphate (Pi) deprived conditions. This activation occurs mainly in photosynthetic tissues and is less important in roots. In leaves, the enhanced biosynthesis of JA coincides with membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered by the lack of Pi. We addressed the possible role of JA on the dynamics and magnitude of glycerolipid remodeling in response to Pi-deprivation and resupply. Based on combined analyses of gene expression, JA biosynthesis and glycerolipid remodeling in wild type Arabidopsis and in the coi1-16 mutant, JA signaling seems important in the determination of the basal levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic Acid (PA), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). JA impact on MGDG steady state level and fluctuations seem contradictory. In the coi1-16 mutant, the steady state level of MGDG is higher, possibly due to a higher level of PA in the mutant, activating MGD1, and to an increased expression of MGD3. These results support a possible impact of JA in limiting the overall content of this lipid. Concerning lipid variations, upon Pi-deprivation, JA seems rather associated with a specific MGDG increase. Following Pi-resupply, whereas the expression of glycerolipid remodeling genes returns to basal level, JA biosynthesis and signaling genes are still upregulated, likely due to a JA-induced positive feedback remaining active. Distinct impacts on enzymes synthesizing MGDG, i.e. downregulating MGD3, possibly activating MGD1 expression and limiting the activation of MGD1 via PA, might allow JA playing a role in a sophisticated fine tuning of galactolipid variations.

P A Distin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • gallium solvent extraction from Acidic solutions with octyl phenyl Acid Phosphate opap reagents
    Hydrometallurgy, 1995
    Co-Authors: I Mihaylov, P A Distin

    Abstract:

    Abstract Solvent extraction of gallium from Acidic solutions using octyl phenyl Acid Phosphate (OPAP) with several different ratios of its components, mono- and di-octyl phenyl phosphoric Acids (HM and HD, respectively), has been studied. The extraction is described by four simultaneous reactions, leading to the formation of four metal-extractant complexes: GaM 3 , GaD 3 , GaM 2 D and GaMD 2 . The proposed reactions explain and allow prediction of distribution coefficients as a function of pH, extractant concentration and composition.