Acinetobacter Anitratus - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acinetobacter Anitratus

The Experts below are selected from a list of 180 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Acinetobacter Anitratus – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Maria Walczuk – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Susceptibility of isolates of Acinetobacter Anitratus and Acinetobacter lwoffii to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum
    FEMS Microbiology Letters, 1992
    Co-Authors: Jankowski S, Kryspina Grzybek-hryncewicz, Małgorzata Fleischer, Maria Walczuk
    Abstract:

    The bactericidal activity of normal human serum against the Gram-negative coccobacilli Acinetobacter Anitratus and Acinetobacter lwoffii was studied; 12% and 84%, respectively, of the tested strains appeared to be sensitive. Thus, serum resistance may be an important factor contributing to the pathogenic potential of A. Anitratus strains. Three types of bactericidal action were shown. In the first, the strains were killed when the alternative complement pathway was activated. In the second, some strains required both the classical and alternative pathways. In the third variant, the strains needed either the alternative or classical activation pathway.

Jankowski S – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Studies on the influence of ozone on complement-mediated killing of bacteria
    FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, 1994
    Co-Authors: Włodzimierz Doroszkiewicz, Irena Sikorska, Jankowski S
    Abstract:

    The role of ozone in the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter Anitratus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to serum was investigated. It was found that ozone-treated cells were more susceptible to complement-mediated killing serum. These results suggest that ozone damage or change of cell membrane leads to a more rapid penetration of the membrane attack complex of complement.

  • Susceptibility of isolates of Acinetobacter Anitratus and Acinetobacter lwoffii to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum
    FEMS Microbiology Letters, 1992
    Co-Authors: Jankowski S, Kryspina Grzybek-hryncewicz, Małgorzata Fleischer, Maria Walczuk
    Abstract:

    The bactericidal activity of normal human serum against the Gram-negative coccobacilli Acinetobacter Anitratus and Acinetobacter lwoffii was studied; 12% and 84%, respectively, of the tested strains appeared to be sensitive. Thus, serum resistance may be an important factor contributing to the pathogenic potential of A. Anitratus strains. Three types of bactericidal action were shown. In the first, the strains were killed when the alternative complement pathway was activated. In the second, some strains required both the classical and alternative pathways. In the third variant, the strains needed either the alternative or classical activation pathway.

Souha S. Kanj – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ventilator-associated pneumonia at a tertiary-care center in a developing country: incidence, microbiology, and susceptibility patterns of isolated microorganisms.
    Infection control and hospital epidemiology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Zeina A. Kanafani, Layla Kara, Shady N. Hayek, Souha S. Kanj
    Abstract:

    Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) complicates the course of up to 24% of intubated patients. Data from the Middle East are scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, microbiology, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolated microorganisms in VAP in a developing country. Design: Prospective observational cohort study. Setting: The American University of Beirut Medical Center, a tertiary-care center that serves as a major referral center for Lebanon and neighboring countries. Patients: All patients admitted to the intensive care and respiratory care units from March to September 2001, and who had been receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours, were included in the study. Results of samples submitted for culture were recorded and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolated pathogens was performed. Results: Seventy patients were entered into the study. The incidence of VAP was 47%. Gram-negative bacilli accounted for 83% of all isolates. The most commonly identified organism was Acinetobacter Anitratus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fifty percent of all gram-negative bacterial isolates were classified as antibiotic resistant. Compared with patients without VAP, patients with VAP remained intubated for a longer period and stayed in the intensive care unit longer. VAP was not associated with an increased mortality rate. Conclusion: Compared with other studies, the results from this referral center in Lebanon indicate a higher incidence of VAP and a high prevalence of resistant organisms. These data are relevant because they direct the choice of empiric antibiotic therapy for VAP.

A. F. Cheng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Investigation of the epidemiology of hospital isolates of Acinetobacter Anitratus by two molecular methods
    The Journal of hospital infection, 1996
    Co-Authors: J. M. Ling, R. Wise, T.h.s. Woo, A. F. Cheng
    Abstract:

    Abstract Two hundred and two isolates of Acinetobacter Anitratus from 126 patients in 36 wards belonging to 11 specialties of a university teaching hospital were compared by ribotyping and restriction enzyme digest analysis (REA) of total DNA. Forty-six groups were defined by both techniques and there was 96·5% agreement between the methods for the designation of isolates into groups. Only two groups were endemic and circulating in the whole hospital while others were less common. Burns and intensive therapy units had the highest number of isolates and these were mainly of the two endemic groups while renal dialdialysis and neonatal units had isolates belonging to the less common groups. Of the 32 patients with multiple isolates, 17 were infected or colonized at different sites by two and up to four groups of A. Anitratus . Both ribotyping and REA of total DNA are discriminatory methods for typing A. Anitratus , however, the latter is a simpler and more rapid method and it can be used in a routine clinical laboratory.

F.a. Tosolini – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Epidemiological surveillance of Acinetobacter species in a teaching hospital
    Pathology, 1992
    Co-Authors: K.a. Wise, F.a. Tosolini
    Abstract:

    A rapid increase in the isolation rate of gentamicin-resistant Acinetobacter Anitratus from clinical specimens from patients in a spinal cord injuries unit (SCIU) prompted a hospital-wide surveillance study of all isolates of Acinetobacter sp. 260 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp. were recovered from 237 patients over a 2-year period, 156 isolates from 135 SCIU patients and 104 isolates from 102 patients in all the other hospital units. In SCIU patients, 133 isolates were recovered from urine, 21 from wounds and aspirates, 1 from sputum and 1 from blood culture. In non-SCIU patients, 12 isolates were recovered from urine, 43 from wounds and aspirates, 48 from sputum and 1 from blood culture. 69% of isolates from SCIU patients were resistant to gentamicin, compared to 3% from non-SCIU patients. Gentamicin-resistant A. Anitratus was isolated from many environmental sites in the SCIU wards, from the hands of 7 of the 94 staff members tested and from rectal swabs of many SCIU patients. API 20NE profiles and antibiograms suggested that two distinct gentamicin-resistant strains of A. Anitratus had become endemic in the SCIU and that nosocomial transmission was a frequent occurrence. The intestinal tract of SCIU patients appeared to constitute a large reservoir for the potential transmission of these organisms. There was no evidence that significant nosocomial transmissions of any strain of A. Anitratus occurred in non-SCIU units