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Josep Guarro – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sarocladium and Acremonium infections: New faces of an old opportunistic fungus.
    Mycoses, 2020
    Co-Authors: Alba Pérez-cantero, Josep Guarro

    Abstract:

    The genera Acremonium and Sarocladium comprise a high diversity of morphologically and genetically related fungi generally found in the environment, although a few species, mainly Sarocladium kiliense and Acremonium egyptiacum, can also be involved in many human infections. Clinical management of opportunistic infections caused by these fungi is very complex, since their correct identification is unreliable, and they generally show poor antifungal response. More than 300 clinical cases involving a broad range of Acremonium/Sarocladium infections have so far been published, and with this review we aim to compile and provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on Acremonium/Sarocladium human infections in terms of presentation, diagnosis, treatments and prognoses. We also aim to summarise and discuss the data currently available on their antifungal susceptibility, emphasising the promising results obtained with voriconazole as well as their impact in terms of animal infections.

  • The Protean Acremonium. A. sclerotigenum/egyptiacum: Revision, Food Contaminant, and Human Disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, José F. Cano-lira, Arien Van Iperen, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

  • the protean Acremonium a sclerotigenum egyptiacum revision food contaminant and human disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, Arien Van Iperen, Jose F Canolira, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

Josepa Gené – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Protean Acremonium. A. sclerotigenum/egyptiacum: Revision, Food Contaminant, and Human Disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, José F. Cano-lira, Arien Van Iperen, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

  • the protean Acremonium a sclerotigenum egyptiacum revision food contaminant and human disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, Arien Van Iperen, Jose F Canolira, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

  • New Acremonium-like species in the Bionectriaceae and Plectosphaerellaceae
    Mycological Progress, 2017
    Co-Authors: Alejandra Giraldo, Josepa Gené, Deanna A. Sutton, Nathan Wiederhold, Josep Guarro

    Abstract:

    Several molecular studies have demonstrated that species traditionally assigned to the form genus Acremonium are polyphyletic, while Acremonium sensu stricto is a central element of the family Bionectriaceae (Hypocreales). Based on phenotypic characters and molecular phylogenetic analyses, two new Acremonium species, A. moniliforme and A. dimorphosporum , are described. The former is related to Emericellopsis and is characterised by cylindrical conidia, acicular phialides and abundantly formed moniliform hyphae. Acremonium dimorphosporum resembles A. borodinense . It produces dimorphic conidia that are either cylindrical and smooth-walled or ellipsoidal and rough-walled. The new genus Brunneomyces is proposed based on three species, including B. brunnescens (formerly A. brunnescens ), B. europaeus and B. hominis . They are characterised by brown hyphae, sympodial conidiophores and chains of ovoidal to ellipsoidal conidia. Chordomyces albus sp. nov. is characterized by its light-coloured colonies, simple or branched conidiophores, phialides with percurrent proliferations and cylindrical collarettes, and ellipsoidal to cylindrical conidia. The combined analysis of the LSU, ITS, RPB2 and TEF1-α loci supports the inclusion of B. brunnescens , B. europaeus , B. hominis and C. albus in Plectosphaerellaceae.

Richard C Summerbell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Protean Acremonium. A. sclerotigenum/egyptiacum: Revision, Food Contaminant, and Human Disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, José F. Cano-lira, Arien Van Iperen, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

  • the protean Acremonium a sclerotigenum egyptiacum revision food contaminant and human disease
    Microorganisms, 2018
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, Josepa Gené, Akif Eskalen, Pedro W. Crous, Aditya K. Gupta, Arien Van Iperen, Jose F Canolira, M Starink

    Abstract:

    Acremonium is known to be regularly isolated from food and also to be a cause of human disease. Herein, we resolve some sources of confusion that have strongly hampered the accurate interpretation of these and other isolations. The recently designated type species of the genus Acremonium, A. alternatum, is known only from a single isolate, but it is the closest known relative of what may be one of the planet’s most successful organisms, Acremonium sclerotigenum/egyptianum, shown herein to be best called by its earliest valid name, A. egyptiacum. The sequencing of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, actin genes, or both for 72 study isolates within this group allowed the full range of morphotypes and ITS barcode types to be elucidated, along with information on temperature tolerance and habitat. The results showed that nomenclatural confusion and frequent misidentifications facilitated by morphotaxonomy, along with misidentified early sequence deposits, have obscured the reality that this species is, in many ways, the definitive match of the historical concept of Acremonium: a pale orange or dull greenish-coloured monophialidic hyphomycete, forming cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or obovoid conidia in sticky heads or obovoid conidia in dry chains, and acting ecologically as a soil organism, marine organism, plant pathogen, plant endophyte, probable insect pathogen, human opportunistic pathogen, food contaminant, probable dermatological communicable disease agent, and heat-tolerant spoilage organism. Industrially, it is already in exploratory use as a producer of the antibiotic ascofuranone, active against trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, and microsporidia, and additional applications are in development. The genus-level clarification of the phylogeny of A. egyptiacum shows other historic acremonia belong to separate genera, and two are here described, Parasarocladium for the Acremonium radiatum complex and Kiflimonium for the Acremonium curvulum complex.

  • Acremonium phylogenetic overview and revision of gliomastix sarocladium and trichothecium
    Studies in Mycology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Richard C Summerbell, Josep Guarro, Cecile Gueidan, M Starink, Arocha Y Rosete, Hansjosef Schroers, G. Sybren De Hoog, Jonathan Scott

    Abstract:

    Over 200 new sequences are generated for members of the genus Acremonium and related taxa including ribosomal small subunit sequences (SSU) for phylogenetic analysis and large subunit (LSU) sequences for phylogeny and DNA-based identification. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that within the Hypocreales, there are two major clusters containing multiple Acremonium species. One clade contains Acremonium sclerotigenum, the genus Emericellopsis, and the genus Geosmithia as prominent elements. The second clade contains the genera Gliomastix sensu stricto and Bionectria. In addition, there are numerous smaller clades plus two multi-species clades, one containing Acremonium strictum and the type species of the genus Sarocladium, and, as seen in the combined SSU/LSU analysis, one associated subclade containing Acremonium breve and related species plus Acremonium curvulum and related species. This sequence information allows the revision of three genera. Gliomastix is revived for five species, G. murorum, G. polychroma, G. tumulicola, G. roseogrisea, and G. masseei. Sarocladium is extended to include all members of the phylogenetically distinct A. strictum clade including the medically important A. kiliense and the protective maize endophyte A. zeae. Also included in Sarocladium are members of the phylogenetically delimited Acremonium bacillisporum clade, closely linked to the A. strictum clade. The genus Trichothecium is revised following the principles of unitary nomenclature based on the oldest valid anamorph or teleomorph name, and new combinations are made in Trichothecium for the tightly interrelated Acremonium crotocinigenum, Spicellum roseum, and teleomorph Leucosphaerina indica. Outside the Hypocreales, numerous Acremonium-like species fall into the Plectosphaerellaceae, and A. atrogriseum falls into the Cephalothecaceae.