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Kieran Mccorry – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, Deployment and Migration SP1 and SP2 – 6 – Deployment and Interoperability Guidelines for the Active Directory Connector
    Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Deployment and Migration SP1 and SP2, 2006
    Co-Authors: Kieran Mccorry

    Abstract:

    This chapter explores the functionality aspects of Active Directory Connector usage in a coexisting Exchange 5.5 and Active Directory environment. The objects contained in the Active Directory organizational units are mapped to a single container on the target Exchange 5.5 server; then the standard legacy Exchange Directory replication model allows this container to be seen across all legacy Exchange sites. When the Active Directory Connector synchronizes an Exchange 5.5 distribution list over to the Active Directory, it always creates a mail-enabled universal distribution group as the synchronized object. Distributing Active Directory Connectors implies the use of a set of connection agreements per Active Directory Connector that synchronizes Exchange 5.5 containers and Active Directory organizational units closer to one and in a timely fashion. An Active Directory Connector hosts a connection agreement that synchronizes data over a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) connection, typically between separate Exchange 5.5 and Active Directory servers.

  • Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, Deployment and Migration SP1 and SP2 – 5 – Public Folder Interoperability and Migration
    Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Deployment and Migration SP1 and SP2, 2006
    Co-Authors: Kieran Mccorry

    Abstract:

    This chapter explains some of the core aspects of public folders (PF) in a mixed Exchange 5.5 environment, public folder connection agreements, public folder hierarchy replication, and permissions interoperability with groups and distribution lists. The Exchange 2003 Active Directory Connector provides a special type of connection agreement for dealing with public folders, in addition to the configuration and recipient connection agreements. The public folder connection agreement replicates mail addresses for Exchange 5.5 public folders into the Active Directory so that Exchange 2003 users have the ability to directly send mails to legacy Exchange 5.5 public folders, just as they could as native Exchange 5.5 users. Although public folders have not evolved significantly with Exchange 2003, a number of subtle changes have crept in with Exchange 2003 administration, and even with some Exchange 2000 service packs.

  • 3 advanced Active Directory Connector configuration
    Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Deployment and Migration SP1 and SP2, 2006
    Co-Authors: Kieran Mccorry

    Abstract:

    This chapter discusses some lesser known configuration options that can be set on the Active Directory Connector to give a greater flexibility with Active Directory Connector synchronization. Two different mechanisms control the selection of objects for Active Directory Connector synchronization: using Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) search filters, and using Active Directory Connector custom object matching. While the Active Directory Connector has been in existence since Exchange 2000 first hit the streets, the Active Directory Connector has undergone quite a few refinements over the years, so the version of the Active Directory Connector that we use today with Exchange 2003 is much more powerful than earlier versions. Many bug fixes have been applied silently to the Active Directory Connector, and there has been significant behind-the-scenes functionality enhancement, most notably the increased functionality to support cross-site mailbox moves introduced with Exchange 2003 Service Pack 1 (SP1).

Tony Redmond – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Exchange and the Active Directory
    Tony Redmond's Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 with SP1, 2005
    Co-Authors: Tony Redmond

    Abstract:

    This chapter discusses the Exchange and the Active Directory. Messaging systems depend on directories for a variety of needs. Fetching email addresses for users and knowing what server their mailboxes are located on is perhaps the most obvious, but directories also hold large amounts of configuration data, such as how servers connect together and permissions. In the first generation of Exchange, the Directory Store (DS) held all of this data. The link between the DS and the other Exchange components, such as the Store and the MTA, that need to access Directory data is simple, because all of the components reside on the same physical server. Exchange accesses DCs and GCs for different purposes. DCs provide essential system configuration data such as details of the servers and Connectors installed within an organization. GCs provide information about user mailboxes and email addresses. The Routing Engine uses data taken from the GCs to route email, and MAPI clients, such as Outlook, use the same data as the Global Address List (GAL). Other clients use LDAP requests to search and retrieve information about recipients from the AD. Other examples of AD consumers include the Active Directory Connector, Recipient Update Service, and the Exchange System Manager (ESM) console.